PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP0359395 18.12.1997
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0359395
Titel Dateneingabe in einem Expertensystem
Anmelder Hitachi, Ltd., Tokio/Tokyo, JP
Erfinder Nanba, Shigeaki, Hitachi-shi Ibaraki-ken, JP;
Nigawara, Seiitsu, Hitachi-shi Ibaraki-ken, JP
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 68928440
Vertragsstaaten DE, FR, GB
Sprache des Dokument En
EP-Anmeldetag 10.08.1989
EP-Aktenzeichen 893081554
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 21.03.1990
EP date of grant 12.11.1997
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 18.12.1997
IPC-Hauptklasse G06F 17/40

Beschreibung[en]

The present invention relates to a data input system for inputting data to a database.

It is now becoming increasingly common for an operating system, such as an industrial plant, to be operated on the basis of an "expert system" which operates on the basis of data stored in a database. It is generally accepted that a database used in an expert system is part of a "growing system", because the data is constantly being increased or changed, by actual operation of the system by the user, so that no final completion is ever achieved.

In such a system, the data represents relationships, and in this specification the term data (or information) refers to an operating relationship between operating parameters of the operating system. Those parameters may be operating conditions, process variables, or fixed values.

Some of that data may be initially input to the system (stored in the database) by the manufacturer of the system and therefore the validity of the data may be determined before the system is in operation. However, when the system is in operation, further data must be manually entered into the database by an operator and it is therefore necessary to ensure the integrety and validity of such data. Furthermore, differences may develop between the data initially stored in the database and the data that is actually used after, perahps, years of operation of the system. These factors can result in invalid data within the system, which is to be avoided.

When considering these two factors, various arrangements have been proposed to try to overcome them. In Japanese Patent Application No. 60-41128, the data input by several operators is first passed to a database administrator, who is trained to determine which can data can be stored in the database. This system, of course, requires that the database administrator be fully aware of the correct operating relationships, and the level of training needed for this is a limit to the practicality of this proposal.

The problem of the development of invalid data over a period of time was considered by Japanese Patent Application No. 58-192161, in which "age" information is associated with the data being input, and the data is automatically deleted after expiry of a predetermined age limit. This is also not a satisfactory solution, since valid data, which may subsequently be useful, will be deleted if it has reached its age limit.

Thus, neither of these two proposals adequately face the problem of input of invalid data, and this provides a limit to the practicality of the use of databases in such expert systems.

Another relevant prior art is FUTURE GENERATION SYSTEMS. vol. 3, no. 3, September 1987, AMSTERDAM, NL, pages 201-215; P.S. SHEU AND W.S. LEE 'Efficient Processing of Integrity Constraints in Deductive Databases'. In this document it is described how the process of validating integrity constraints can be made efficient when a database is changed.

The present invention proposes that the data input system stores therein "fundamental rules" which are compared with the data being input. The invention is defined by the appended claims. Each of those fundamental rules is a predetermined relationship between the operating parameters of the operating system, and thus it becomes possible to check, for any given datum, which of the fundamental rules corresponds to those operating parameters, and which of such fundamental rules are satisfied by the data being input. In this way, it becomes possible to determine if the data is valid and the datum can be transmitted to the database when every corresponding fundamental rule is satisfied, or transmission can be prevented if any corresponding fundamental rule is not satisfied.

Thus, many fundamental rules between the operating parameters and the operating system may be stored in a suitable memory, and when a new datum is input, the first step is to determine which operating parameters are used in the operating relationship of the datum, and to extract all the fundamental rules defining relationships between those operating parameters. Then, the datum can be compared with those fundamental rules to see if it is valid.

If those fundamental rules are satisfied, the datum is valid and similarly if any is not satisfied, the datum is invalid.

It can occur, however, that for given datum, there are no corresponding fundamental rules (because the relationship between the operating parameters required by the datum have not been predefined). In this case, the system cannot directly determine the validity or invalidity of the datum, and then it may be necessary for a skilled operator to determine whether that datum should be input or not (such a datum being hereinafter referred to as a "reserved" datum). To ensure that only a sufficiently trained operator can cause a reserved datum to be input to the database, the input of the system may associate a plurality of priorities to the users of the system, and permit transmission of a reserve datum only when the user has a predetermined priority (e.g. corresponding to a trained operator).

Furthermore, the system may have a management history table which records the history of input of the data, so that if subsequently a given datum or data is found to be invalid, it becomes possible for that data to be extracted by determining when the datum or data was input in terms of the management history of the data. Thus, any incorrect data can be easily updated or deleted on the basis of the history of the database.

The present invention is applicable to any database in which the data represents operating relationships. It is particularly concerned with a data input system for operating an industrial plant, but may also be applicable to other situations such as medical databases.

An embodiment of the invention will now be described in detail, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which :

  • Figure 1 shows a block diagram of a data input system being an embodiment of the present invention;
  • Figure 2 shows a detail of the hierarchy of the database;
  • Figure 3 shows various flow processes;
  • Figure 4 shows the relationship between two processed items;
  • Figure 5 shows the influence of process data;
  • Figure 6 shows a table illustrating operation states;
  • Figure 7 shows a block diagram of a thermal power plant which may be operated on the basis of a system according to the present invention;
  • Figure 8 shows examples of fundamental rules;
  • Figure 9 shows the organisation of fundamental rules;
  • Figure 10 shows a management history table;
  • Figure 11 shows the matching-enable conditions for main and sub data bases;
  • Figure 12 shows how history from the history management table is displayed on a screen;
  • Figure 13 shows schematically how access to the database is controlled; and
  • Figure 14 shows a form for registration of data.

Figure 1 shows the schematic configuration of a data input/control system of an informational database according to an embodiment of the present invention.

In Figure 1, a data input/output (I/O) device 21 is connected via a user interface 22 to a database 26. The connection between database I/O device 21 and the user interface is illustrated by buses 6, 8, and the connection between the user interface 22 and the database 26 is illustrated by buses 1, 7. The user interface 22 is conected via buses 9, 10 to a management history table 27 which records history of data input through the system by I/O device 21. Indeed, as will be described later, it is also possible to display history information on a display of the I/O device 21 from the management history table 27 when desired.

Figure 1 also illustrates that the user interface 22 is connected to a fundamental rule memory 24, which stores the relationships (fundamental rules) which are predetermined between the operating parameters of the operating system. When data is input from the I/O device 21, the fundamental rules relating to the corresponding operating parameters are extracted from the fundamental rule memory 24 via the data edit processing device 23, and transmitted via a conflict/error selecting device 25 and hence to the input/output device. The data edit processing device 23 compares the data with the corresponding fundamental rules to determine whether the data conforms to the relationship established within the fundamental rules, and conflicting or erronious data can be extracted by the selecting device 25. Then, the user only stores the data whose validity has been confirmed in the database 26 by suitable operation of the I/O device 21.

The operation of the system of Figure 1 will be described in more detail later. Before doing that, however, the detailed structure and effects of the fundamental rule memory 24, the database 26, and the management history table 27 will be discussed.

1. Fundamental Rule Memory 24

The structure and concept of the fundamental rule section 24 will be described using a thermal power plant as an example of an object system operated by an expert system utilizing data base 26.

Figure 7 shows the typical configuration of a thermal power plant. As shown in Fig. 7 steam generated in a boiler 201 is sent to a high-pressure turbine 202 through a main steam pipe 218. Some of the thermal energy of the steam is converted into mechanical energy to drive a generator 204. The steam that operates high-pressure turbine 202 passes through a low-temperature reheated steam pipe 219, is heated again in reheater 216 then is sent to reheated turbine 203 through a high-temperature reheated steam pipe 220 for subsequent operation. The steam that operates reheated turbine 203 is sent (in steam form) to a condenser 205, is cooled by cooling water (such as sea water), then condenses into water. The condensate is pumped up by condensate pump 206, which performs thermal recovery through heat exchangers such as condensate heat exchanger 207, air extracting device 208, and gland condenser 209. The temperature of the condensate is raised by a low-pressure feedwater-heating device 210 and deareating device 211. The temperature of the feedwater (whose pressure is increased in boiler feedwater pump 212) is further raised in a high pressure feedwater-heating device 213. This feedwater is then supplied to the boiler 201 through a main feedwater pipe 221. The feedwater in the high-pressure feedwater-heating device 213, deaerator 211, and low-pressure feedwater-heating device 210 is heated by the bled air of the turbine. In the boiler, the fuel is controlled by a fuel adjusting valve 217 as it passes through a fuel burner 214, then the necessary amount of air is added to the fuel for combustion in a furnace.

The feedwater receives the heat radiated by this combustion, converts it into steam, which is superheated in superheating device 215 and sent to the turbine. The fundamental rules previously prepared and stored in fundamental rule section 24 will be described in respect of the causal relations established between the various process data on the above-described thermal power plant (object system). Section 1-1 below discusses the extraction of the causal relations established in the object system; Section 1-2 describes the concept for extracting all causal relationships. Note that the process data used in extracting the causal relationships may be in analog or digital form.

1-1. Extracting causal relationships. A) Note the directions in which the liquid and heat flow in this process (see Fig. 3).

This directional flow is necessary in such processes. The flow of such liquids as water, condensed steam, oil, and gas and the flow of heat and electricity are considered normal in plant operation, especially when the relation accompanying the flow is specified. The rules relating to flow rate, pressure, temperature, and heat are described below. Figure 3 (a) shows a piping system of the object. The high-temperature, high-pressure fluid source is shown on the left of the figure and a branched fluid consumption part is shown on the right. When considering such a simplified piping system, the following relationship exists for the flow rate, pressure, and temperature at each point I - IX.

Flow Rate: The total inflow discharge and outflow discharge at a system branch point is always equal. As shown in Fig. 3 (b), the following relation always exists in each flow rate (Qa to Qe :Qa = Qb + Qc, Qc = Qd + Qe), and if the total outflow discharge is smaller than the inflow discharge, an abnormality that causes a leak exists on the upstream side of the discharge flow rate detecting point (behind the branched point) is detected. If the inflow flow rate is smaller, use of abnormal mixtures of other liquids from an external system can be detected.

Pressure: The pressure detection value on the upstream side due to the pressure loss attirbuted to the fluid flow speed (restricted to systems that do not use pumping action) is always larger than the pressure detection value on the downstream side. As shown in Fig. 3(c), the following relationships exist: P1 ≥ P2 ≥ P3 (P'3), P3 ≥ P4 ≥ P6. If these relationships did not exist, the direction in which liquids flow would be abnormal. Thus, the flow rate must be checked, and information on the anomaly must be prepared.

Temperature: Liquid is needed for heat exchange in the flow process with an external system. In case of low-temperature liquid, heat flows in from an external system. For high-temperature liquid, heat is discharged to the external system. Figure 3(d) shows the latter case. The following relationships exist: T1 ≥ T2 ≥ T3 (T'3), T3 ≥ T4 ≥ T6. Heat: Even if the liquid used as a thermal medium did not exist, any temperature difference causes heat to be transferred thereby increasing the entropy.

Monitoring the thermal stress caused by temperature difference between the interior and exterior walls is important in plant equipment that uses thick metal materials. As shown in Fig. 3(e), the transfer of heat can be estimated under individual operation conditions, and under certain conditions, the relationships Ta>Tb, Tc>Td, or Ta - Tb < set value, Tc - Td < set value exist. If this relationship did not exist, abnormal information would be generated.

B) Consider the correlation between process data (See Fig. 4).

Process data is essential for managing and controlling the final process quantity of plant production, and attention must be given to the important quantities in such correlations as the primary production process quantity for the amount of materials supplied, secondary production process quantity, specific parameters, and final process quantity. As shown in Fig. 4(a) - (c), because two process items have such correlations as linear, disproportional, and saturation characteristics, dependent variable side process data Y (corresponding to the measurement value of independent variable side process data X) is indicated in the table by (d) with the correlation equation (when possible).

C) Consider the influence exertion route of the process data (Fig. 5).

When considering the process data, we must assume that there is other data related to the first process data. The assumed data should consist of the data group that forms the source of effecting the process data, and the data group that forms the destination of the effects as shown in Fig. 5.

D) Consider the operation terminal state (Fig. 6).

A close relationship exists between the operation state of a plant and each operation terminal, particularly when the plant is in an anomaly state. Therefore, attention must be paid to the operation state of each operation terminal in each normal/anomaly state, Each operation state is specified in a specific fundamental rule or in group. Figure 6 shows the case wherein an individual operation terminal (valve A only) is checked, and the case where two operation terminals (valves A and B) are checked.

1-2 Concept for extracting all causal relationships.

Though several concepts for extracting the fundamental rule of an object systen are shown, it is difficult to extract all fundamental rules efficiently, particularly for a large system. The following describes the concept for efficiently extracting all fundamental rules by using the above-described thermal power plant as an example.

When the above-described thermal power plant is divided in the production process as an energy carrier, the overall operation can be expressed as four main processes. In other words, the main processes consist of a air-gas-fuel system 41, a water-steam system 42, a turbine-electricity system 44, and a cooling water system 443, When such divided processes are allowed to correspond to the equipment composition shown in Fig. 7, the range enclosed by the respective dotted lines in Fig. 7 can be obtained. From the standpoint of the equipment composition, the water-steam system 42 includes a heat-exchange function achieved by the boiler 201 and a heat-consumption function achieved by the turbine 202. The main process in which the flow of substances (as an energy carrier) can be classified into several subprocesses which determine the flow. For the water-steam system 42, the equipment is divided into a low-pressure heater group, high-pressure heater group, and a boiler turbine. Further, the subprocess includes a group of equipment used to perform a charged work. This group is considered a uni-process. In the high-pressure heater group, an individual high-pressure heater is also considered a uni-process. Therefore, the entire power generation plant can be understood from one side surface by dividing the process into equipment operation-terminal levels at the plant. Moreover, the equipment for the high-pressure heater includes a high-pressure heater, outlet valve, inlet valve, bypass valve, and bleed valve.

Therefore, all fundamental rules can be efficiently extracted by precisely classifying the entire thermal power plant into a main process, subprocesses, uni-processes, and equipment, and by successively extracting the causal relationships between a precisely classified level or levels in terms of major and subordinate relationships.

Figure 8 shows an example of a fundamental rule extracted in respecct of the high-pressure heater group of the water-steam system, the correspondence between the divided system processes, an example of the extracted fundamental rule, and the concepts (A-D) for extracting the rules described in Figs. 3 to 6.

Example 1: Fundamental rule of equipment level (intrinsic for equipment)

This is related to the state of operation terminal in fundamental rule extraction group D, and the specified condition that a heater bleed valve is always in the correctly opened state during normal plant operation.

Example 2: Fundamental rule (between equipment)

This is related to the state of operation terminal in fundamental rule extraction group D, and the specified condition that the opening/closing states of the heater's outlet valve and inlet valve are the same to establish the correlation between the equipment used in one high-pressure heater set. When a time difference (that can be ignored in the opening/closing states of both valves) exists, processing to eliminate such time difference is executed.

Example 3: Fundamental rule of a single process level (in a single process)

This is related to the state of operation terminal in fundamental rule extraction group D, further related to the flow direction of process A, with the condition that the inlet and outlet valves are correctly opened and a bypass valve is correctly closed during normal plant operation, or the inlet and outlet valves are correctly closed, and the bypass valve is correctly opened for the anticiapted abnormal plant operation, i.e. a heater bypass operation is specified. In the latter case, the specified condition is that the feedwater flow rate at the heater outlet is equal to the feedwater flow rate at the heater inlet (at a constant water level in the heater).

Example 4: Fundamental rule of single process level (between single processes)

This is related to the flow direction of the process in fundamental rule extraction group A, and the specified condition that the feed water temperature at the heater's outlet is lower than the feedwater tamperature at the heater's outlet in the next stage (slip stream side) and with the specified condition that the feedwater pressure at the heater's outlet is higher than the feedwater pressure at the heater's outlet in the next stage. These rules are based on the heat exchange and flow passage pressure loss in the feedwater line system near the high-pressure heater.

Example 5: Fundamental rule of subprocess level (in subprocess)

This is related to the flow directin of the process in fundamental rule extraction group A, and the specified condition that the sum of the bleed flow rate of a high-pressure heater group is equal to the drain flow rate of the final stage heater with a constant water level in the heater. This is also related to the correlation between the process data in fundamental rule extraction group B, and the specified condition that the total rising value of feedwater temperature in each high-pressure heater exceeds a certain set value, and the fact that total heat exchange in the high-pressure heater group is correct when considering the heat balance from one side surface.

Example 6: Fundamental rule of subprocess level (between subprocesses)

Nothing is specifically specified.

Example 7: Fundamental rule of main process level (in main process)

This is related to the correlation between the process data on fundamental rule extraction group B, and the specified condition that a linear relation exists between the feedwater flow rate at the outlet of the high-pressure heater and the main steam flow rate, and that the relation between water and steam in the water/steam process is monitored in terms of plant performance.

Example 8: Fundamental rule of main process level (between main processes)

This is related to the correlation between the process data on fundamental rule extraction group C, and the specified condition that power generator output in a plant that permits heater cut operation may increase by 5% during operation. This means that in a different process, the correlation between the main data on the plant is changed under certain operation conditions.

Though several kinds of examples related to high-pressure heaters are listed, it is not necessary to specify the rule in which the difference between different divided processes and that between similar processes is not distinct or superposed.

Each fundamental rule extracted in the above-described procedure is organized in a summary table shown in Fig. 9. These rules are stored in the fundamental rule section shown in Fig. 1. Figure 9 shows part of the fundamental rule extracted as shown in Fig. 8, and the correlation between the process data and related process data is recorded (in the form of a definition table) as a set of information. For example, rule R1 in the figure is the described in '1' in Fig. 8. This content describes high-pressure heater bleed flow rate I2A master trip delay set signal I4D alarm reset signal I5D, and generator output signal I3A (which are confirmed as process data related to heater bleed valve opening degree signal I, and are abnormal process data to be monitored when I2A or I3A is larger than each prescribed value. When I4D and I5D are in the reset state, normal operation is determined. Rules R2 and R3 are the contents of steps 7 and 3-3 in Fig. 8.

Both are two independent rules determined in relation to the high-pressure heater outlet feedwater flow rate I4'A. In rule R2, this rate is described as main steam flow rate I5A, while main steam pressure I6A and main steam temperature I7A are the related process data to be monitored. The following relationship exists in this case: |I4A - I5A x I6A x I7A| ≤ C4A x I3A. Here, C4A is a constant. In R3, it is described as high-pressure heater inlet feedwater flow rate I8A, while high-pressure heater water level I9A is the related process data to be monitored. In this case, the following relation exists:

|I4A - I8A| ≤ C9A x I9A (C9A is a constant). Though not described in Fig. 9, other fundamental rules in Fig. 8 are described in relation to the process data.

According to such fundamental rules, the table shown in Fig. 9 is searched according to the data name sent through signal line 11 shown in Fig. 1. The related process data (written in relation to the process data and correlation established between the process data) is then read and output to signal line 3.

II. Data Base 26

Figure 2 shows the structure of the data base 26. The data base is basically constructed to enable the effective use of the data. Thus, it is important to have a data arrangement from which data can be easily extracted. The structure of this device is determiend as being hierarchial, corresponding the the system configuration of the object system and control device configuration (in relation to the preparation procedures for fundamental rule section 24).

The data base may use a double structure of a main data base 26M and a sub data base 26S. This is based on the fact that data base 26 is used as the data source of an expert system, etc., and an inference engine based on the supplied data contents. The data base is also used online to control the object system during operation according to the results of inference processing. In other words, the data base used the double structure of the main data base 26M for the inference engine and sub data base 26S for checking the data content offline. The main and sub data bases 26M and 26S have the same contents when operation is started, if the operator determines that the data base contents require correction based on experience acquired through actual plant operation, the operator must access the contents of the sub-data base 26S to correct the data. Consequently, the contents of both data bases will gradually become different. When the number of different data items exceeds a certain number or the data containing important parameters is corrected, the contents of the main data base 26M are corrected to match the contents of the sub data base 26S, while the inference accuracy of the inference engine is improved during online operation.

Generalizing part 26I is positioned between both data bases 26M, 26S to count the number of different data items or to set the matching timing between the data bases.

Although Fig. 2 shows the hierarchial structure of the sub data base 26S as an example, the main data base 26M also has the same structure.

The object system shown in Fig. 7 is based on a hierarchial configuration consisting of a main process, subprcess, uniprocess, equipment, and (in fundamental rule section 24) in relation to the rule extraction to prepare the fundamental rules, the information data belonging to the main process is stored in main process data base which is divided into parts 26Sm1, 26Sm2.

The informational data belonging to the subprocess is stored in a subprocess data base divided into parts 26SS1, 26SS2, 26SS3. Further, a uniprocess data base and equipment data base divided into parts 26SK1, 26Sk2, 26SSK3 have similar configurations. The reason why a hierarchial configuration was adopted is that some fundamental rules used in data edit processing must consider the flow directions of liquids in the process and the influence exertion route. Consideration must also be given to a process quantity because liquids determine the boundary conditions in the continuous lateral direction for each division in the hierarchial configuration, as well as to the effects exerted in the longitudinal and lateral directions of the hierarchial configuration. Therefore, the information can easily be incorporated when stored as individual items of data due to the advantage in understanding the overall concept.

III. Management History Table

Various data input accesses of informational data bases are inevitable during long-term operation. Therefore, the informational data base is known as a "growing system" because final completion is never ahcieved. Therefore if the operator and time for addition and correction work are not known after the initial preparation, the information in the data base will become confising and disordered, which will inhibit data base use. For example, two or more items of informational data (for process data) may be stored in a data base, and conflicting conditions may occur in the informational data. Otherwise, numerical discordance will occur. In fundamental rule memory 24, data edit processing device 23 and selecting device 25 can only select input data that does not result in such confusion. Consequently, correct selection is impossible. Furthermore, conflicting or erroneous data may be created due to operator mistakes. When such erroenous data is registered in the data base, the erroneous data cannot be extracted and displaying these results outside cannot be achieved. If an error occurs in the results of inference engine processing based on data in the informational data base, the presence of erroneous data is clarified by assuming that an error is in the data that forms the basis of the inference. In such cases, a data input management history table (shown in Fig. 10) must be used to search for the time point when the error ocurred in the above-described data input. All information related to such access controls as renewal access and confirmation access of data in the adata base are recorded in this table so that the history of the informational data can be determined. The data input access history for the informational data base includes the name, qualification and other items of individual information about an operator who has accessed the system. It also includes the input knowledge-base information for each access operator, and the type of information (addition, deletion, change, etc.) used in the operation. Such important items of enviromental information as the date, day of week, load and atmospheric conditions may also be used. When the data base structure has a double data base structure of a main data base and a sub data base, access control of data input is provided with individual records in both data bases, and information related to the copying work between both data bases is also recorded in the history table.

IV. Data I/O Device

Data I/O device 21 is designed as a man-machine system that uses a screen (CRT), keyboard, etc., to read data from and write data to the data base 26. It also displays and writes information to the management history table 27, transfers data to the data edit processing device 23, displays the contents of set fundamental rules, and updates the fundamental rules. One example of the display function is the simultaneous display of the contents of data before and after correction on the same screen. When the operator corrects the data, the corrected part is easily confirmed by its changing its colour by underlining, or by flashing indication. The guidance display during the operation-inhibited period prohibits change, even if the management history data can be displayed and the alarm display when the contents conflict with the displayed confirmation results, but not with the fundamental rule when additional information can be placed on the right to access the data base by the operator.

V. Data Edit Processing Device

When informational data to be input into the informational data base 26 is input using data I/O device 21, the input data is sent to the data edit processing device 23 through the user interface section 22. The data is read into the device 23 according to the fundamental rule (including the ID number for identifying the process data that makes up the data from fundamental rule memory 24). Moreover, the contents are compared to determine whether they match. As a result, when the contents match, they are determined to be normal. If the contents do not match, but there is no conflicting data the contents are "reserved". If the contents are conflicting, however, they are judged to be abnormal. For contents that are judged to be abnormal, the process data that makes us the information is automatically rearranged. For a serial information composition (A - B - C) consisting of three process data items, the entire composition (BAC, BCA, CAB, CBA and ACB) is prepared and checked according to the fundamental rule. In other words, like the same process data, elements are rearranged, and only process data that does not conflict with the fundamental rule is sent to the next stage of processing. If there is no such conflicting data in the rearrangement, operation occurs and, the process data is sent to the next stages of processing in the form of the original information. In the next stage of transmission, the fundamental rule also serves as the basis for a check to be made at the same time, together with the information for which a normal determination has yet to be rendered.

VI. Selecting Device

The edit processing result of all data is input into conflict error selecting device 25. When the data is normal the data is sent as is to data base I/O device 21. Reserved data and abnormal data are appended with the fundamental rule as the basis of determining reservation or abnormality, while abnormal information is prepared as a whole. Furthermore, the selecting function for rewriting normal, reserved and abnormal data into a form in which the operator of this device can easily understand is provided. This is the basic function of conflict/error selecting device 25. The information after selection is transmitted to data I/O device 21.

The question of each component of the system shown in Fig. 1 will now be described, as will the effects that can be achieved when the operator executes operation from data I/O device 21.

The operator of this device confirms the manually or automatically prepared knowledge-base information on a display device (such as screen (CRT) in data I/O device 21, then sends the knowledge-base information to data edit processing device 23 through signal line 6, interface section 22, and signal line 2. The function of user interface section 22 to achieve a conversion function for information processing signals and external peripheral equipment between the memory in data base 26. Bus 1, bus 7, etc., illustrate the flow of information, while a single-line bus or multiple cable lines may be adopted in a practical embodiment. Data I/O device 21 is equipped with a display device (such as a screen (CRT), keyboard, and operating tools), and the information read by data I/O device 21 is displayed on the screen (CRT). The presence of the designated information input by an operator is also confirmed. After this confirmation, the operator transmits the information to data edit processing device 23 through bus 2. The flow of information described above is the same as the single data processing of each data processing of each data item or the batch processing of multiple data items.

After receiving the input information from data I/O device 21, data edit processing device 23 automatically reads the necessary fundamental rule through bus 3 from fundamental rule memory 24 or based on a start instruction issued from data I/O device 21. The required fundamental rule may be any of the fundamental rules that are transmitted through user interface section 22 and signal line 11, and prepared using an identification code attached to the process data that makes up the input information. For example, for input information a1 > b1 (a1, b1: process data), the necessary data is obtained according to the fundamental rule using al and all fundamental rules using b1. When the fundamental rules corresponding to the above are three fundamental rules (R1: a1 = K+b1 (K > O), R2: a1 < C1 + C3, R3: b1 - c1 < O), all three fundamental rules are extracted, then the data information a1 > b1 is applied to these fundamental rules. The rules that conform, do not conform, and those for which application is impossible are classified. The conforming rule is considered normal; the nonconforming rule is considered abnormal; and the rule for which application is impossible is considered to be reserved. In this example, fundamental rule R1: a1 = aO + b1 (aO > O) is satisfied and is determined to be normal. The other two fundamental rules (R2 and R3) are reserved. Further, in this example, if the first input data information is a1 < b1, the judgement is as follows: R1 (abnormal), R2 (reserved), and R3 (reserved). In this case, elements a1 and b1 are rearranged and compared with the fundamental rule again. Although the contents subsequently match the above-described conclusion, the rearranged part is attached to the index information.

The following describes the editing of specific information by using bearing vibrration as an example in the previously described thermal power plant. Based on the assumption input information Do (described below) exists, Ro is considered the corresponding fundamental rule.

Do:
Information not applicable to edit processing, and which is currently in data I/O device 21.
Do01:
Preparation date (19 April 1988, 23.00)
Do02:
Person responsible for preparation (A) (third-class qualified)
Do03:
TMS 550 °C, MV > LA

(1988-4-19-23:00)
MV:
Bearing vibration amplitude value
LA:
Bearing vibration alarm set value
TMS:
Main steam temperature
Fundamental rule Ro: Fundamental rule for MV of input information Do and rule considering the influence source related to "vibration generation (major abnormality) 1; high bearing lubricating oil temperature, exertion source 2; dangerous turbine speed, exertion source 3; excessive rate of generator coil temperature variation.

In this case, operator B (first-class qualified) checks whether information data Do (yet to be subjected to the above-described edit processing) is true or false by using this device. Also,

Do4:
Preparation date (20 April 1988, 23:00)
Do5:
Operator B (First-class qualified)
(Considered part of the input information)

(Edit processing)

Knowledge-base information items Do1, Do2, and Do3 are prepared by operator A, then are extracted from data I/O device 21 by operator B for display on a CRT not shown in the figure. This display form conforms to the settings of individual devices. For example, when using the IF - THEN form:

IF (TMS > 550°C), THEN (MV > LA), Input by (A -3) 1988-4-19-23.00.

Operator B confirms the contents displayed on the screen (CRT), then transmits the contents to data edit processing device 23. Then, a search is made for the corresponding fundamental rule (including process date) for each item of process data (TMS, MV included in information Do3).

A check is also made for conflicting data in the above-described information. Because Ro is the applicable fundamental rule in the example, the following expression is formed:

Ro:
IF (TBRG > LTBRG OR LSC1 < S < LSC2 OR RTGC > LRTGC)

THEN (MV > LA)
Here, TBRG:
Bearing lubricating oil temperature
LTBRG:
Bearing lubricating oil maximum temperaturs set value
LSC1:
Dangerous turbine speed minimum set value
LSC2:
Dangerous turbine speed maximum set value
S:
Turbine speed
RTGC:
Generator coil temperature variation rate
LRTGC:
Generator coil temeprature variation rate maximum set value

Because there is no fundamental rule associated with TMS, knowledge-base information Do3 (prepared by operator A) only refers to fundamental rule Ro. A check is then made on rule conformity. The matching results of fundamental rule Do and input information Do show that Do3 does not conflict with fundamental rule Ro, but does not conform to it.

Information on normal, abnormal, and reserved conditions after the above edit processing work is transmitted to conflict/error selecting device 25 through bus 4, with the fundamental rule that forms the basis of judgement. The function of the selecting part is not affected even if the operation is executed in edit processing device 23. The function relieves the function's workload to divide the equipment in each processing mask.

Although the information transmitted as normal data to selecting device 25 may be received in singular form and transmitted to the next stage of processing, the information applied to the rearrangement is further applied to the comment addition processing to help the operator understand the index information. For this work, preparations are made in advance in th user interface section then operation is started by the index information signal. The information that conflicts with the contents of the fundamental rule is attached to the fundamental rule that forms the basis. The information to which information is attached is then prepared and transmitted to the data I/O device. Although the reserved information may be deleted (ignored) by the selecting function here, the information is attached to the fundamental rules as reference data for the operator before being transmitted to the next stage and displayed on a screen (CRT), where it is finally judged by the operator. For this reserved information, Do3 (which is transmitted to conflict/error selecting device 25 through bus 4) and fundamental rule Do with the fundamental rule are set into pairs to form one unit of reserved information. The form of the reserved information is expressed as follows:

Do3 - PENDING

By rule (IF TBRG > LTBRG OR

LSC1 < S < LSC2 OR

RTGC > LRTGC)

Note that when the results (abnormal or normal) are determined, the data attached with the reason (applicable fundamental rule) is transmitted to data I/O devide 21 with a form of expression form that is considered the same in these cases.

As previously described, the information arranged in the conflict/error selecting device is transmitted to the data base I/O device through bus 5. The I/O device is set into the wait state so that the necessary information can be immediately displayed on the screen (CRT) immediately when requested by the operator (according to operator instructions). Therefore, sufficient memory capacity is important when considering the overall information of processing capacity.

Although the evaluated data is collected in data I/O device 21, some data stored in data base 26 cannot be used as valid data. Thus, measures must be taken to prevent valid data from being deleted during this deletion operation. For this purpose, a deletion instruction signal for all the information is sent according to a method that gives consideration to preventing erroneous operation by the operator. For example, the information to be deleted must be confirmed through conversational processing using the screen (CRT) to prevent the operator for accidently deleting any edited information. Another measure taken to ensure correct deletion is that the data read into the I/O device 21 is stored in a temporary memory area of the interface section for subsequent deletion after a series of operations. The information waiting in the data base I/O device 21 (as instructed by the operator) is displayed on the display device (i.e. the screen (CRT) and matched with the information read and temporarily stored at device initialization. For normal data, the same data is displayed in the display area is different from the original data, this part and the fundamental rule are simultaneously displayed in the display area before and after correction. If part of the data is different from the original data, this part and the fundamental rule are simultaneously displayed to help the operator determined the actual differnces. The operator checking the displayed contents executes an operation on the device side to confirm that confirmation has been completed in principle, determines the correctness of storing the data in the data base, the stores the data in the data base. To reduce the operator's workload, the data can be automatically stored in the data base when the operator determines that the data is information related to a simple subject.

To enable the operator to complete the above opearations, such basic and required operation tools as those for addition, deletion, change, storage, and reading must be provided in the I/O device of the data base.

The information after data editing and selecting is storedf in data I/O device 21, and is displayed for confirmation as being "stored" or "deleted" by the operator. For reserved information, operator B determines the correctness of storing data in the data base when the check results obtained through this I/O device 21 does not conflict with the fundamental rule, but which were not determined as being normal. When operator B is qualified to determined whether the information is to be stored in the data base, he/she can also make this determination for reserved information. Note that there are many cases where the check results are reserved among the set of fundamental rules, while the degree for operator qualification is based on the operator's ability to make the proper decision in such cases.

For example, if operator B is informed that no causal relationship exists betwween the rise in main steam temperature and the bearing vibration amplitude value, the reserved information can be deleted.

When operator B determines that information Do is to be stored in the data base and this storage operation is executed, data Do3 is stored in the data base, while items of information Do3- Do5 related to the operation are recorded in the management history table 27 (Fig. 10) through bus 9.. The operator's name, qualification (Do5), content of information before and after correction (information, date Do4), load of preparing information, and any important items of enviromental data (if prepared) are recorded in the management history table 27. This table can also be used to prepare a summary table by using the data base access order and operator sorting function so that the history information can be read later as required. In this example, after operator B stores the reserved information Do in the data base, then is informed a week later that a judgement error was made, the management history table 27 can be opened to delete the contents of processing stored in the data base. Note that one term is added to the history term in the management history table when the data for actual information stored in the data base is deleted.

Therefore, only the history of the changed part (from the original data base) is batch-controlled so that when information in the data base is corrected, the management history table 27 is opened to compare each item of information before and after data correction. At this time, the operator confirms the information to be deleted, then the specified deletion is executed. In this way, the operator can access the data base. Although the management history table 27 enables the contents to be displayed for confirmation, the contents cannot be changed. This is because management history is necessary for data correction. If the history could be changed, for example, it would become difficult to determine the established guidelines for correcting data in the informational data base. As a result, all edited data in the data base would have to be rechecked. Thus, when the data base contains a large volume of data, such management is essential for maintaining the reliability and integrity of the data contents.

The following method is used to display information in the career management table onto the screen (CRT) of the data I/O device 21. According to theis method, whether the plant operation state matches the related knowledge-base information on the data base can be easily and visually determined. In other words, the processing system diagram designated by the operator is displayed on the screen (CRT) as shown in Fig. 12. After the type of process quantity to be observed is designated and the position in the designated system is specified, the process quantity can be specified. Searching for recorded information in parameter oriented form can be done by real-time display on the screen (CRT) of the knowledge-base information that contains the specified process quantity (as compositio elements) and which is stored in the management history table 27. This method can also be commonly used with a selection system that uses a mouse to enter characters. Moreover, the operator can easily understand the information through the color-display of the high or low usage frequency of data in a specific process level system diagram, based on the number of times that a process quantity (of knowledge-basic information) has been used. In this case, such usage can be better understood by the operator when a graphics display is set according to an arbitrarily specified number of times of use).

The following desribes the portable performance of information in the management history table 27. Although the need for information recorded in the management history table 27 is considered essential, this requirement is basically satisfied by displays enabled through the man-machine section of the data input control system. This recorded information is very important in terms of helping the operator use and operate the informational data base over long-term plant operation, and to evaluate successful plant hardware operation. Management is provided so that when the principles of plant operation or technical level of the operator are examined, this information can be easily extracted so that the contents can be checked.

Therefore, such equipment as a floppy disc drive mechanism, memory read and write mechanism, a screen hard copy mechanism, and a mechanism for copying onto IC cards or ID cards must be provided.

To extract the knowledge-base information in real time and to read out the above recorded information to an external device, each item of information has an external device, each item of information has an individual identification code. Information is extracted according to the index of information recorded according to the corresponding assortment of periods, operator qualifications, types of operations, and operating terminals. In this operation, an input sequence of entering the required date, name qualification, terminal used, and type of operation for each operation is provided. Thus, operation can be executed by simply monitoring the establishment conditions of each type of assortment.

In data I/O device 21, data Do3 (to be stored in data base 26) is stored in data base 26 and management history table 27. The old data is deleted. In this case, the operator adds and deletes the information in data base 26 (in Fig. 2) in an off-line mode for sub-data base 26S because the data is not necessarily to be used in inference processing, etc., immediately after being stored in the data base. Data Do3 (in the sub-data base) is stored in the bearing system uniprocess data base section of the data base. This is because the data base structure is that of the bearing system uniprocess as one process in the hierarchial division at each plant process level. The usage frequency of the knowledge-base information is also considered when bearing vibration is generated. In other words, when bearing vibration is generated, a similar vibration tends to occur in the contiguous bearing system in many cases. When considering the maintenance of the entire bearing system, the acquisition of information related to multiple bearings is desired. Thus, when the bearing system uniprocess batch-extracts information from the data base of the subprocess (including higher-level bearing systems), the mutual correlation and casual relationship can be easily understood. Furthermore, when the main data base has the same structure as that of the above sub-data base, the main data base is used to provide internally used information, while the sub-data base is used to complete stored information. In this case, the main data base is used online during plant operation, while the sub-data base is used offline during plant operation. Thus, the storage and utilization of information can be clearly and rationally divided. In this type of arrangement, even if erroneous information is input into the sub-data base, the erroneous information can be corrected. For example, previously input contents can be deleted up to when the sub-data base contents are copied into the main data base. More specifically, a qualified operator should check the management history table after completing the preceding copying work, immediately before copying the contents of the sub-data base to the main data base. More effective data base processing is also afforded by the following:

  • a) Before accessing the informational dta base, qualification is checked by using a magnetic card or an IC card, then data is entered by using a portable and simplified input device. The manufacturer who prepared the informational data base device as the supply source of the knowledge-base information transmits the data over a transmission line.
  • b) Even if a matching-enabled condition for both the main data base and sub-data base is not satisfied, the operator must match the contents of both data bases based on this accidental occurance, and decide not to execure inference calculation using the knowledge-base information of the main data base. A function for interrupt processing that ignores matching-enabled conditions may be provided. As shown in Fig. 11, a contents-matching instruction is issued from each interrupted data base, and the task of registering other knowledge-base information in the data base is temporarily stopped. Only where the stop operation completion condition and AND condition of the interruption instruction are satisfied, and both data contents allowed to be matched. At the same time, if a delayed-start instruction is issued to prevent other tasks from being started during the matching work, and to obtain the necessary time for matching. The contents-matching instruction that was transmitted once is held until the matching coincidence completion is satisfied.

When the degree of difference between the registered contents and main data base contents used for operation increases due to addition, correction, or other operations involving the knowledge-base information in the sub-data base, the operator must confirm this degree of difference. Therefore,the contents of both data bases are compared, and the different parts are displayed on the screen (CRT) or output to an external output device, etc. The method of outputting the order, range, and form of data may be in real-time sequence, at a specific process level, or in a form divided into right and left parts on the screen (CRT). By assuming the above-described difference between both data bases, plant operations ranging from the inference engine to the operation terminal can be simulated using the knowledge-base information in the sub-data base. Therefore, the response of a plant processing can be confirmed in advance by using only the sub-data base contents related to control system operations involving the operation terminal according to the knowledge-base information in the main data base.

d) Qualified operators having the right to access the informational data base are classified as A and B. "A" refers to a qualified operator on the manufacturer side of this devide; "B" refers to a qualified operator on the user side. As shown in Fig. 13, operator "A" can use any of the terminals 60 (1,2,3,4,) installed on the manufacturer side during preparation or testing or to enter the basic required knowledge-base information into the device. Operator "A" can also use any of the terminals 60 (5,6,7,8,) on the user side (after delivery) for instruction-assisted technical servicing. Conversely, a qualified operator B on the user side can only use one of the terminals 60 (5,6,7,8,) on the user side. Restrictions are also placed on the applicable ranges of data base access changed by "A". Because various restrictions are placed on the terminals used and the range of data base access, operators A and B must work on the respective manufacturer and user sides, and must generally work with the divided sections inside. Since the operator's role in management in each section is limited, and because a mutual relation is established, the installation site of each terminal 60 must be the same in each section.

Figure 14 shows an example of the registration form for entry into the informational data base by an ooperator using the data base input control system.

When a qualified operator having the righ to accesss the data base observes vibration V due to a drop in plant equipment bearing oil pressure (P) at time T=To, and the related contents are registered as knowledge-base information in IF-THEN form, subject A(P) and subject C(V) are registered as A(P) → C(V) in the data base (in hierarchial form at the subprocess level) with the sufficient and required conditions. After item T1 elapses, a qualified operator having the right to access the datq base observes vibration V due to a rise in the plant equipment bearing discharged oil temperature (T). If the related contents are registered as knowledge-base information in IF-THEN form, this information is then registered in the data base by adding contents B(T) → C(V) to the above-described knowledge-base information A(P) → C(V). In other words, registration is done using A(P) or B(T) as the sufficient condition and C(V) as the required condition. To register data in the data base, it must be recorded in a form that considers the coordination between individual elements that make up the information. Otherwise, the data remains in the operation form used in the management history table. In the above-described example, at time T = To, the input knowledge-base information (displayed on a (CRT) screen 0001) is converted into the data base registration form (displayed on a screen (CRT) 0101), then is stored. At this time, the form corresponding to screen (CRT) 0001 is recorded in the career management table as is to prevent accidental deletion. Moreover, after time T1 elapses and the operator is to input screen (CRT) 0002 into the data base, the same condition at that applying to the required condition part C(V) is searched for in the data base. Only the supposition condition B(T) is stored in the data base as an element of knowledge-base information displayed on the screen (CRT) 002. In addition, the necessary programs are run to process this element in parallel to the other element A(P) stored with the registered-base knowledge information. Then, the form displayed on a screen (CRT) 0102 is converted in the data base, and the element is registered. At this time, the data base memory location corresponding to screen 0101 is reset and replaced by screen 0102.

By adopting this invention, even unskilled operators can easily obtain the correct informational data. Moreover, if incorrect informational data is registered, the data can be easily corrected.


Anspruch[de]
  1. Dateneingabesystem zur Eingabe von Daten in eine Datenbank (26), wobei alle Daten jeweils eine physikalische Ursachen-Wirkungs-Beziehung zwischen Anlagedaten eines Betriebs einer Anlage mit prozeßvariablen Parametern eines Zielsystems darstellen, wobei das System eine Einrichtung (21), die einem Benutzer die Eingabe neuer solcher Daten erlaubt, und eine Übertragungseinrichtung (22) zur Übertragung der neuen Daten an die Datenbank (26) umfaßt,

       dadurch gekennzeichnet, daß

       das System außerdem einen Speicher (24) zur Speicherung mehrerer fundamentaler Regeln eines Expertensystems, die jeweils eine vorbestimmte Beziehung zwischen den Betriebsparametern des Zielsystems darstellen, und eine Verarbeitungseinrichtung (23, 25) zur Untersuchung, ob jede den neuen Daten entsprechende fundamentale Regel von den neuen Daten erfüllt wird, aufweist und die Übertragungseinrichtung (22) eingerichtet ist, die neuen Daten an die Datenbank (26) zu übertragen, wenn jede den Parametern der neuen Daten entsprechende fundamentale Regel erfüllt ist.
  2. Dateneingabesystem zur Eingabe von Daten in eine Datenbank (26), wobei alle Daten jeweils eine physikalische Ursachen-Wirkungs-Beziehung zwischen Anlagedaten eines Anlagebetriebs mit prozeßvariablen Parametern eines Zielsystems darstellen, wobei das System eine Einrichtung (21), die einem Benutzer die Eingabe neuer solcher Daten erlaubt, und eine Übertragungseinrichtung (22) zur Übertragung der neuen Daten an die Datenbank (26) aufweist,

       dadurch gekennzeichnet, daß

       das System einen Speicher (24) zur Speicherung mehrerer fundamentaler Regeln eines Expertensystems, wobei jede fundamentale Regel eine vorbestimmte Beziehung zwischen den Betriebsparametern des Zielsystems darstellt, und eine Verarbeitungseinrichtung (23, 25) zur Untersuchung, ob jede den neuen Daten entsprechende fundamentale Regel von den neuen Daten erfüllt ist, aufweist und die Übertragungseinrichtung (22) eingerichtet ist, die Übertragung der neuen Daten an die Datenbank zu verhindern, wenn bei einer den Parametern der neuen Daten entsprechenden fundamentalen Regel ein Widerspruch auftritt.
  3. System nach Anspruch 1 oder 2, wobei die Verarbeitungseinrichtung (23, 25) eingerichtet ist zu bestimmen, ob es keine fundamentale Regel gibt, die den Parametern der neuen Daten entspricht, die Eingabeeinrichtung (21) zur Zuweisung mehrerer Prioritäten zu den Benutzern eingerichtet ist und die Übertragungseinrichtung (22) eingerichtet ist, neue Daten ohne entsprechende fundamentale Regel nur dann zu übertragen, wenn der Benutzer eine vorbestimmte Priorität hat.
  4. System nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei die an die Datenbank (26) übertragenen neuen Daten zum Ersatz alter Daten bestimmt sind und die Eingabeeinrichtung (21) einen Speicher zur Speicherung der alten und der neuen Daten aufweist.
  5. System nach Anspruch 4, wobei der Speicher der Eingabeeinrichtung (21) zur Speicherung von Informationen über die Identität von Benutzern, die die alten und die neuen Daten eingeben, eingerichtet ist.
  6. Datenbanksystem mit einer Datenbank (26) und einem Dateneingabesystem nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche zur Eingabe von Daten in die Datenbank (26).
  7. System nach Anspruch 6, wobei die Datenbank (26) Daten hierarchisch speichert.
  8. Betriebssystem für eine Industrieanlage, aufweisend:
    • eine Datenbank zur Speicherung von Daten über die Betriebsbedingungen der Anlage, wobei die Daten jeweils eine physikalische Ursachen-Wirkungs-Beziehung zwischen Anlagedaten eines Anlagebetriebs mit prozeßvariablen Parametern der Anlage darstellen,
    • ein Führungssystem zur Erzeugung von Steuerinformationen entsprechend den Parametern, und
    • ein Dateneingabesystem nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche zur Eingabe von Daten in die Datenbank.
  9. Verfahren zur Eingabe von Daten in eine Datenbank über ein Dateneingabesystem, wobei die genannten Daten jeweils eine physikalische Ursachen-Wirkungs-Beziehung zwischen Anlagedaten eines Anlagebetriebs mit prozeßvariablen Parametern eines Zielsystems darstellen, aufweisend:
    • Einspeichern mehrerer fundamentaler Regeln eines Expertensystems in das Eingabesystem, wobei jede fundamentale Regel eine vorbestimmte Beziehung zwischen den genannten Parametern des Zielsystems darstellt,
    • Eingeben neuer der genannten Daten in das Dateneingabesystem,
    • Untersuchen der neuen Daten, um festzustellen, ob jede fundamentale Regel, die den Parametern der neuen Daten entspricht, erfüllt ist, und
    • Übertragen der neuen Daten der Datenbank lediglich dann, wenn jede fundamentale Regel entsprechend der Parameter der neuen Daten erfüllt ist.
  10. Verfahren nach Anspruch 9, mit folgenden Schritten:
    • Zuordnen mehrerer Prioritäten zu Benutzern,
    • Feststellen, ob es keine fundamentalen Regeln gibt, die den Parametern der neuen Daten entsprechen, und
    • sofern die neuen Daten keine entsprechende fundamentale Regel aufweisen, Übertragen der neuen Daten an die Datenbank lediglich dann, wenn der Benutzer eine vorbestimmte Priorität hat.
  11. Verfahren zur Eingabe von Daten in eine Datenbank über ein Dateneingabesystem, wobei die Daten jeweils eine physikalische Ursachen-Wirkungs-Beziehung zwischen Anlagedaten eines Anlagebetriebes mit prozeßvariablen Parametern eines Zielsystems darstellen, aufweisend:
    • Speichern mehrerer fundamentaler Regeln eines Expertensystems in das Dateneingabesystem, wobei jede fundamentale Regel eine vorbestimmte Beziehung zwischen den Parametern des Zielsystems darstellt,
    • Eingeben neuer der genannten Daten in das Dateneingabesystem,
    • Untersuchen der neuen Daten, um festzustellen, ob jede den Parametern der neuen Daten entsprechende fundamentale Regel erfüllt ist, und
    • Verhindern einer Übertragung der neuen Daten an die Datenbank, wenn bei einer der fundamentalen Regeln entsprechend der Parameter der neuen Daten ein Widerspruch auftritt.
  12. Verfahren nach Anspruch 11, mit folgenden weiteren Schritten:
    • Zuordnen mehrerer Prioritäten zu Benutzern,
    • Bestimmen, ob es keine fundamentalen Regeln gibt, die den Parametern der neuen Daten entsprechen, und
    • sofern die neuen Daten keine entsprechende fundamentale Regel aufweisen, Übertragen der neuen Daten an die Datenbank lediglich dann, wenn der Benutzer eine vorbestimmte Priorität hat.
Anspruch[en]
  1. A data input system for inputting data to a database (26), each datum of the data being a physical relationship of cause and effect which exists between plant data of plant operation between process variable parameters of an objective system, the system having means (21) for permitting a user to input a new datum of the data, and transmitting means (22) for transmitting the new datum to the database (26);

       characterized in that:

       the system includes a memory (24) for storing a plurality of fundamental rules of an expert system, each fundamental rule being a predetermined relationship between the operating parameters of the objective system, and processing means (23,25) for investigating if each fundamental rule corresponding to the new datum is satisfied by the new datum, the transmitting means (22) being arranged to transmit the new datum to the database (26) when every fundamental rule corresponding to the parameters of the new datum is satisfied.
  2. A data input system for inputting data to a database (26) each datum of the data being a physical relationship of cause and effect which exists between plant data of plant operation between process variable parameters of an objective system, the system having means (21) for permitting a user to input a new datum of the data, and transmitting means (22) for transmitting the new datum to the database (26);

       characterized in that:

       the system includes a memory (24) for storing a plurality of fundamental rules of an expert system, each fundamental rule being a predetermined relationship between the operating parameters of the objective system, and processing means (23,25) for investigating if each fundamental rule corresponding to the new datum is satisfied by the new datum, the transmitting means (22) being arranged to prevent transmission of the new data to the database if any fundamental rule corresponding to the parameters of the new datum is contradicted.
  3. A data input system according to claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the processing means (23,25) is arranged to determine if there are no fundamental rule corresponding to the parameters of the new datum, the input means (21) is arranged to associate a plurality of priorities to users, and the transmitting means (22) is arranged to transmit new data having no corresponding fundamental rule only when the user has a predetermined priority.
  4. A data input system according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the new datum transmitted to the database (26) is arranged to replace an old datum of the data, and the input means (21) has a memory for storing the old datum and the new datum.
  5. A data input system according to claim 4, wherein the memory of the input means (21) is arranged to store information relating to the identity of users who input the old datum and the new datum.
  6. A database system comprising a database (26) and a data input system according to any one of the preceding claims for inputting data to the database (26).
  7. A database system according to claim 6, wherein the database (26) stores data on a hierarchical basis.
  8. An operating system for an industrial plant, comprising:
    • a database for storing data relating to operating conditions of the plant, each datum of the data being a physical relationship of cause and effect which exists between plant data of plant operation between process variable parameters of the plant;
    • a guidance system for generating control information relating to the parameters; and
    • a data input system according to any one of the preceding claims for inputting data to the database.
  9. A method of inputting data to a database via a data input system, each datum of said data being a physical relationship of cause and effect which exists between plant data of plant operation between process variable parameters of an objective system, said method comprising:
    • storing in said data input system a plurality of fundamental rules of an expert system, each said fundamental rule being a predetermined relationship between said parameters of said objective system;
    • inputting a new datum of said data to said data input system;
    • investigating said new datum to determine if each said fundamental rule corresponding to the parameters of said datum is satisfied; and
    • transmitting said new datum of said database only when every said fundamental rule corresponding to the parameters of said new datum is satisfied.
  10. A method according to claim 9, further including the steps of:
    • associating a plurality of priorities to users;
    • determining if there are not fundamental rules corresponding to the parameters of said new datum; and
    • if said new datum has no corresponding fundamental rule, transmitting said new datum to said database only when said user has a predetermined priority.
  11. A method of inputting data to a database via a data input system, each datum of said data being a physical relationship of cause and effect which exists between plant data of plant operation between process variable parameters of an objective system, said method comprising:
    • storing in said data input system a plurality of fundamental rules of an expert system, each said fundamental rule being a predetermined relationship between said parameters of said objective system;
    • inputting a new datum of said data to said data input system;
    • investigating said new datum to determine if each said fundamental rule corresponding to the parameters of said datum is satisfied; and
    • preventing transmission of said new datum to said database if any one of said fundamental rules corresponding to the parameters of said new datum is contradicted.
  12. A method according to claim 11, further including the steps of associating a plurality of priorities to users;
    • determining if there are no fundamental rules corresponding to the parameters of said new data; and
    • if said new datum has no corresponding fundamental rule, transmitting said new data to said database only when said user has a predetermined priority.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Système d'entrée de données pour entrer des données dans une base de données (26), chaque donnée des données étant une relation physique de cause à effet qui existe entre données d'exploitation d'une installation et entre paramètres constituant des variables de traitement d'un système considéré, le système comportant des moyens (21) pour permettre à un utilisateur d'entrer une nouvelle donnée des données, et des moyens de transmission (22) pour transmettre la nouvelle donnée à la base de données (26),

       caractérisé en ce que :

       le système comporte une mémoire (24) pour mémoriser une pluralité de règles fondamentales d'un système expert, chaque règle fondamentale étant une relation prédéterminée entre les paramètres d'exploitation du système considéré, et des moyens de traitement (23, 25) pour déterminer si chaque règle fondamentale correspondant à la nouvelle donnée est satisfaite par la nouvelle donnée, les moyens de transmission (22) étant conçus pour transmettre la nouvelle donnée à la base de données (26) lorsque chaque règle fondamentale correspondant aux paramètres de la nouvelle donnée est satisfaite.
  2. Système d'entrée de données pour entrer des données dans une base de données (26), chaque donnée des données étant une relation physique de cause à effet qui existe entre données d'exploitation d'une installation et entre paramètres constituant des variables de traitement d'un système considéré, le système comportant des moyens (21) pour permettre à un utilisateur d'entrer une nouvelle donnée des données, et des moyens de transmission (22) pour transmettre la nouvelle donnée à la base de données (26),

       caractérisé en ce que :

       le système comporte une mémoire (24) pour mémoriser une pluralité de règles fondamentales d'un système expert, chaque règle fondamentale étant une relation prédéterminée entre les paramètres d'exploitation du système considéré, et des moyens de traitement (23, 25) pour déterminer si chaque règle fondamentale correspondant à la nouvelle donnée est satisfaite par la nouvelle donnée, les moyens de transmission (22) étant conçus pour empêcher la transmission de la nouvelle donnée à la base de données si une règle fondamentale quelconque correspondant aux paramètres de la nouvelle donnée est contredite.
  3. Système d'entrée de données selon la revendication 1 ou 2, dans lequel les moyens de traitement (23, 25) sont conçus pour déterminer si aucune règle fondamentale ne correspond aux paramètres de la nouvelle donnée, les moyens d'entrée (21) sont conçus pour associer une pluralité de priorités à des utilisateurs, et les moyens de transmission (22) sont conçus pour transmettre de nouvelles données ne possédant pas de règle fondamentale correspondante uniquement lorsque l'utilisateur a une priorité prédéterminée.
  4. Système d'entrée de données selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel la nouvelle donnée transmise à la base de données (26) est conçue pour remplacer une ancienne donnée des données, et les moyens d'entrée (21) comportent une mémoire pour mémoriser l'ancienne donnée et la nouvelle donnée.
  5. Système d'entrée de données selon la revendication 4, dans lequel la mémoire des moyens d'entrée (21) est conçue pour mémoriser des informations relatives à l'identité d'utilisateurs qui entrent l'ancienne donnée et la nouvelle donnée.
  6. Système de base de données comportant une base de données (26) et un système d'entrée de données selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, pour entrer des données dans la base de données (26).
  7. Système de base de données selon la revendication 6, dans lequel la base de données (26) mémorise des données sur une base hiérarchique.
  8. Système d'exploitation pour installation industrielle, comportant :
    • une base de données pour mémoriser des données relatives aux conditions d'exploitation de l'installation, chaque donnée des données étant une relation physique de cause à effet qui existe entre données d'exploitation d'une installation et entre paramètres constituant des variables de traitement de l'installation,
    • un système de guidage pour produire des informations de commande relatives aux paramètres, et
    • un système d'entrée de données selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, pour entrer des données dans la base de données.
  9. Procédé pour entrer des données dans une base de données via un système d'entrée de données, chaque donnée desdites données étant une relation physique de cause à effet qui existe entre données d'exploitation d'une installation et entre paramètres constituant des variables de traitement d'un système considéré, ledit procédé comportant les étapes consistant à :
    • mémoriser dans ledit système d'entrée de données une pluralité de règles fondamentales d'un système expert, chacune desdites règles fondamentales étant une relation prédéterminée entre lesdits paramètres dudit système considéré,
    • entrer une nouvelle donnée desdites données dans ledit système d'entrée de données,
    • analyser ladite nouvelle donnée pour déterminer si chacune desdites règles fondamentales correspondant aux paramètres de ladite donnée est satisfaite, et
    • transmettre ladite nouvelle donnée dans ladite base de données uniquement lorsque chacune desdites règles fondamentales correspondant aux paramètres de ladite nouvelle donnée est satisfaite.
  10. Procédé selon la revendication 9, comportant en outre les étapes consistant à :
    • associer une pluralité de priorités à des utilisateurs,
    • déterminer si aucune règle fondamentale ne correspond aux paramètres de ladite nouvelle donnée, et
    • si ladite nouvelle donnée ne possède pas de règle fondamentale correspondante, transmettre ladite nouvelle donnée à ladite base de données uniquement lorsque ledit utilisateur a une priorité prédéterminée.
  11. Procédé pour entrer des données dans une base de données via un système d'entrée de données, chaque donnée desdites données étant une relation physique de cause à effet qui existe entre données d'exploitation d'une installation et entre paramètres constituant des variables de traitement d'un système considéré, ledit procédé comportant les étapes consistant à :
    • mémoriser dans ledit système d'entrée de données une pluralité de règles fondamentales d'un système expert, chacune desdites règles fondamentales étant une relation prédéterminée entre lesdits paramètres dudit système considéré,
    • entrer une nouvelle donnée desdites données dans ledit système d'entrée de données,
    • analyser ladite nouvelle donnée pour déterminer si chacune desdites règles fondamentales correspondant aux paramètres de ladite donnée est satisfaite, et
    • empêcher la transmission de ladite nouvelle donnée vers ladite base de données si l'une quelconque desdites règles fondamentales correspondant aux paramètres de ladite nouvelle donnée est contredite.
  12. Procédé selon la revendication 11, comportant en outre les étapes consistant à associer une pluralité de priorités à des utilisateurs,
    • déterminer si aucune règle fondamentale ne correspond aux paramètres de ladite nouvelle donnée, et
    • si ladite nouvelle donnée ne possède pas de règle fondamentale correspondante, transmettre ladite nouvelle donnée à ladite base de données uniquement lorsque ledit utilisateur a une priorité prédéterminée.






IPC
A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
B Arbeitsverfahren; Transportieren
C Chemie; Hüttenwesen
D Textilien; Papier
E Bauwesen; Erdbohren; Bergbau
F Maschinenbau; Beleuchtung; Heizung; Waffen; Sprengen
G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

Anmelder
Datum

Patentrecherche

Patent Zeichnungen (PDF)

Copyright © 2008 Patent-De Alle Rechte vorbehalten. eMail: info@patent-de.com