PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP0802067 29.05.2002
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0802067
Titel TROCKENFLACHDRUCKPLATTE FÜR DIREKTBILDERZEUGUNG
Anmelder Toray Industries, Inc., Tokio/Tokyo, JP
Erfinder YANAGIDA, Shun-ichi, Otsu-shi, Shiga 520, JP;
IKEDA, Norimasa, Otsu-shi, Shiga 520-21, JP;
KAWAMURA, Ken, Echi-gun, Shiga 529-12, JP;
BABA, Yuzuru, Otsu-shi, Shiga 520, JP;
ICHIKAWA, Michihiko, Otsu-shi, Shiga 520, JP;
FUJIMARU, Kouichi, Otsu shi, JP
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 69620867
Vertragsstaaten BE, CH, DE, FR, GB, IT, LI, NL, SE
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 08.11.1996
EP-Aktenzeichen 969375484
WO-Anmeldetag 08.11.1996
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/JP96/03296
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0009717208
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 15.05.1997
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 22.10.1997
EP date of grant 24.04.2002
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 29.05.2002
IPC-Hauptklasse B41N 1/14
IPC-Nebenklasse B41C 1/10   B41N 1/00   

Beschreibung[en]

The present invention relates to a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate which can be used without using dampening water, and a waterless planographic printing plate obtained by selectively forming an image on the directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate and developing it. In more detail, it relates to a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate remarkably improved in printing durability and developability, and a waterless planographic printing plate obtained by selectively and directly forming an image on the directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate by a laser beam and developing it.

BACKGROUND ART

Making a planographic printing plate using silicone rubber or fluorine resin as the ink repellent layer without using dampening water, especially direct plate making which makes an offset printing plate without using any film for plate making has been used in the short run printing industry, and is beginning to be used also in the areas of offset printing and gravure printing because of such features as simplicity in not requiring any high skill, rapidity to allow a printing plate to be obtained in a short time, rationality to allow a system optimum in terms of desired quality and cost to be selected among diverse systems. Especially recently in the rapid progress of output systems such as prepress systems, image setters and laser printers, new types of various planographic printing plates have been developed. The methods for making these planographic printing plates can be classified into methods of irradiating with a laser beam, methods of writing by a thermal head, methods of selectively applying voltages by pin electrodes, methods of forming an ink repellent layer or inking layer by ink jet, etc.

Among them, the methods of using a laser beam are more excellent than other methods in terms of resolution and plate making speed.

For example, as directly imageable raw plate for waterless planographic printing plates, JP-B-42-21879, US-A-4499147 (US 451940), US-A-5339737 (US 62431), US-A-5353705 (US 125319), EP-A-0573091 (US 59283), etc. propose directly imageable raw plate for waterless planographic printing plates in which a heat sensitive layer containing an infrared absorbing material and a self oxidizing material and an ink repellent silicone rubber layer are laminated on a substrate. Furthermore, USP 247014 proposes a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate in which a heat sensitive layer and an ink repellent silicone rubber layer are laminated on a substrate. However, in these directly imageable raw plates for waterless planographic printing plates, since the heat sensitive layer is hard and fragile, the stress acting on the plate surface during offset printing acts intensively at the interface between the heat sensitive layer andthe silicone rubber layer, to cause adhesion rupture. Furthermore, the heat sensitive layer is likely to be damaged, and according to the increase of printed sheets, the heat sensitive layer below the ink repellent layer is damaged in the non-image area, and this phenomenon erodes the ink repellent layer, to lower image reproducibility disadvantageously. As a result, the printing durability of the printing plate becomes insufficient disadvantageously. Studies have been made for the purpose of improving the printing durability. US-A-5379698 (US 247016) proposes a plate in which a silicone rubber layer is anchored by an adhesion accelerator such as a silane coupling agent, and according to this proposal, though the adhesiveness to the heat sensitive layer is improved, practically sufficient printing durability cannot be obtained. Thickening the ink repellent layer has also been attempted, but the decline of sensitivity caused by thickening and the shortening of ink mileage occur disadvantageously. To overcome these problems, various studies have been made for photosensitive waterless planographic printing plates. JP-A-1-161242, JP-A-1-154159, etc. propose to thicken the ink repellent silicone rubber layer, while compensating for the shortening of ink mileage due to thickening by adjusting the cell depth, for example, by embedding an ink acceptable material. In this case, the problem of a decline in sensitivity remains unsolved, and an additional new step of embedding an ink acceptable material, etc. poses another problem of practical inconvenience. A plate with a filler added into the ink repellent silicone rubber layer has also been studied, but does not sufficiently improve printing durability, though the resistance against the flaws caused by the washing of plate surfaces, etc. can be improved. In addition, there arises a problem in that the ink repellency required in the silicone rubber layer declines greatly. EP-A-0678785 also proposes a printing plate comprising a photosensitive layer and a silicone rubber layer. USP 5379698 describes a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate using a thin metallic film as the heat sensitive layer. In this case, since the thin metallic film itself allows the transmittance of the laser beam to some extent, the sensitivity declines. To prevent this, a reflection layer must be formed below the thin metallic layer, to require an additional coating step disadvantageously in view of cost. JP-B-6-199064, USP 5353705 and EPO 580393 also describe directly imageable raw plates for waterless planographic printing plates using a laser beam as the light source. The original printing plates of the heat destruction type use carbon black as a laser beam absorbing compound and nitrocellulose as a thermally decomposing compound. These printing plates are better than the printing plate using a thin metallic film in laser beam absorption efficiency, but present a problem in that they are likely to be flawed during printing and low in printing durability since the adhesive strength between the silicone rubber layer on the surface and the heat sensitive layer is weak. Furthermore, though carbon black is used as a laser beam absorbing material, all the primary grains of the carbon black used in the above patent are 30 µm or more in diameter, and it cannot be said that the carbon block absorbs the light of a semiconductor laser (about 800 nm in wavelength) efficiently. The reason is that the optical density as a printing plate which is one of the indicators of laser beam absorption efficiency does not become maximum at the grain size. The optical density becomes maximum when the grain size is about 20 µm, and the blackness declines at a grain size of larger than 30 µm. If the grain size is smaller than 15 µm, dispersibility declines. Furthermore, since the carbon black stated in said patent is large in oil absorption, i.e., has a high structure, it presents a problem in that the solution destined to form the heat sensitive layer cannot be applied to form a uniform film since carbon black grains cohere to each other, to raise the viscosity of the solution. On the other hand, the directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate with a thin metallic film as the heat sensitive layer presents a problem in that a reflection layer must be formed below the thin metallic film since the thin metallic film allows some transmittance of the laser beam, though a very sharp image and high resolution can be obtained since the heat sensitive layer is very thin. Moreover, few apparatuses are introduced for efficiently and stably mass-producing these directly imageable raw plates for waterless planographic printing plates.

The present invention has been created to improve the respective disadvantages of the prior art, and provides a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate remarkably improved in printing durability without lowering the developability, image reproducibility, printability and solvent resistance of the plate by using specific compounds or materials for forming the heat sensitive layer and the heat insulating layer as flexible layers, and specifying the initial elastic modulus and 5% stress as tensile properties for the flexibility of the heat sensitive layer or the heat insulating layer or a laminate consisting of both the layers.

An aim of the present invention is to obtain a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate.

Accordingly, the present invention provides a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate, in which a heat insulating layer, a heat sensitive layer and an ink repellent layer are formed in this order on a substrate, the heat sensitive layer having a cross linked structure and being composed of a light-heat converting material, a self oxidising material, and a binder resin having a glass transition point Tg of 20°C or lower, and wherein the heat sensitive layer or a laminate of the heat sensitive layer and heat insulating layer has physical properties of 5 to 100 kgf/mm2 in initial elastic modulus and 0.05 to 5 kgf/mm2 in 5% stress as tensile properties, when measured according to JIS K6301.

THE MOST PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

At first, the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer are described below.

The tensile properties of the heat sensitive layer, or the laminate consisting of both the heat insulating layer and heat sensitive layer, are 5 to 100 kgf/mm2 in initial elastic modulus and 0.05 to 5 kgf/mm2 in 5% stress.

The initial elastic modulus must be 5 to 100 kgf/mm2, preferably 10 to 60 kgf/mm2. If the initial elastic modulus is less than 5 kgf/mm2, the heat insulating layer becomes sticky, to inconvenience the operation of production, and hickeys, etc. are caused during printing unpreferably. The 5% stress must be 0.05 to 5 kgf/mm2, preferably 0.1 to 3 kgf/mm2. If the 5% stress is less than 0.05 kgf/mm2, the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer become sticky to inconvenience the operation of production unpreferably. If the 5% stress is more than 5 kgf/mm2, the repeated stress during printing is likely to destroy the heat sensitive layer or the adhesion interface between the heat sensitive layer and the silicone rubber layer laminated on it, and so, the printing durability declines unpreferably.

The tensile properties can be measured according to JIS K 6301. For measurement, a glass sheet is coated with the solution destined to form a heat insulating layer and/or the solution destined to form a heat sensitive layer, and after the solvent has been evaporated, the remaining sheet is heated at 200°C, to be hardened. Then, an about 100 µm thick sheet as the heat insulating layer and/or the heat sensitive layer is removed from the glass sheet. From the sheet, strip samples of 5 mm x 4 mm are cut off, and the initial elastic modulus and 5% stress are measured at a tensile speed of 20 cm/min using Tensilon RTM-100 (produced by Orientech K.K.).

To let the heat sensitive layer, or the laminate of the heat insulating layer and heat sensitive layer, have the above tensile properties, it is preferable to let the compositions of the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer contain a binder resin. The binder resin in this case is not especially limited as far as it is soluble in an organic solvent and can form a film, but it is preferable to use a homopolymer or copolymer of 20°C or lower in glass transition temperature (Tg). A homopolymer or copolymer of 0°C or lower in Tg is more preferable. Furthermore, it is preferable that the heat sensitive layer as a whole has a crosslinked structure in view of UV ink resistance, etc.

The glass transition temperature (Tg) refers to the transition point (temperature) at which an amorphous high polymer physically changes from its vitreous state to its rubber state (or vice versa) in physical properties. In a relatively narrow temperature range with the transition point as the center, not only the elastic modulus but also such physical properties as expansion coefficient, heat content, refractive index, diffusion coefficient and dielectric constant change greatly. So, the measurement of the glass transition temperature can be classified into the measurement of any property of the entire material such as volume (specific volume) vs. temperature curve measurement, heat content measurement by thermal analysis (DSC, DTA, etc.), refractive index measurement or rigidity measurement, and measurement to identify molecular motion such as dynamic viscoelasticity, dielectric loss tangent and NMR spectrum. As a customary method, the volume of a sample is measured while the temperature is raised using a dilatometer, and the point at which the gradient of the volume (specific volume) vs. temperature curve suddenly changes is identified as the glass transition temperature.

As the binder resin with a function to hold the form in the present invention, any binder resin which can be diluted by an organic solvent and can form a film can be used. The binder resins which can be used in the present invention include the following, though not limited to them.

(1) Vinyl polymers

Homopolymers and copolymers obtained from the following monomers and their derivatives:

  • For example, ethylene, propylene, 1-butene, styrene, butadiene, isoprene, vinyl chloride, vinyl acetate, methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, isopropyl acrylate, n-butyl acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate, isopropyl methacrylate, n-butyl methacrylate, isobutyl methacrylate, n-hexyl methacrylate, lauryl methacrylate, acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, maleic acid, itaconic acid, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate, polyethylene glycol mono(meth)acrylate, polypropylene glycol mono(meth)acrylate, phenoxyethyl (meth)acrylate, 2-(meth)acryloxyethylhydrogen naphthalate, 2-(meth)acryloxyethylhydrogen succinate, acrylamide, N-methylolacrylamide, diacetoneacrylamide, glycidyl methacrylate, acrylonitrile, styrene, vinyltoluene, isobutene, 3-methyl-1-butene, butyl vinyl ether, N-vinyl carbazole, methyl vinyl ketone, nitroethylene, methyl α-cyanacrylate, vinylidene cyanide, polyethylene glycol di(meth)acrylate, trimethylolethane tri(meth)acrylate, neopentyl glycol di(meth)acrylate, pentaerythritol tri(meth)acrylate, pentaerythritol tetra(meth)acrylate, dipentaerythritol hexa(meth)acrylate, hexanediol di(meth)acrylate, trimethylolpropane tri(acryloyloxypropyl) ether, glycerol, compounds obtained by adding ethylene oxide or propylene oxide to a polyfunctional alcohol such as glycerol, trimethylolethane or trimethylolpropane, and (meth)acrylating the addition product. Homopolymers and copolymers obtained by polymerizing or copolymerizing these monomers and their derivatives can be used as binder resins.

Vinyl based polymers of 20°C or lower in glass transition temperature include the following, but the present invention is not limited thereto or thereby.

(a) Polyolefins

Poly(1-butene), poly(5-cyclohexyl-1-pentene), poly(1-decene), poly(1,1-dichloroethylene), poly(1,1-dimethylbutane), poly(1,1-dimethylpropane), poly(1-dodecene), polyethylene, poly(1-heptene), poly(1-hexene), polymethylene, poly(6-methyl-1-heptene), poly(5-methyl-1-hexene), poly(2-methylpropane), poly(1-nonane), poly(1-octene), poly(1-pentene), poly(5-phenyl-1-pentene), polypropylene, polyisobutylene, poly(butene), poly(vinyl butyl ether), poly(vinyl ethyl ether), poly(vinyl isobutyl ether), poly(vinyl methyl ether), etc.

(b) Polystyrenes

Poly(4-[(2-butoxyethoxy)methyl]styrene), poly(4-decylstyrene), poly(4-dodecylstyrene), poly[4-(2-ethoxyethoxymethyl)styrene], poly[4-(hexoxymethyl)styrene], poly(4-hexylstyrene), poly(4-nonylstyrene), poly[4-(octoxymethyl)styrene], poly(4-octylstyrene), poly(4-tetradecylstyrene), etc.

(c) Acrylate polymers and methacrylate polymers

Poly(butyl acrylate), poly(sec-butyl acrylate), poly(tert-butyl acrylate), poly[2-(2-cyanoethylthio)ethyl acrylate], poly(3-(2-cyanoethylthio)propyl acrylate], poly[2-(cyanomethylthio)ethyl acrylate], poly[6-(cyanomethylthio)hexyl acrylate], poly[2-(3-cyanopropylthio)ethyl acrylate], poly(2-ethoxyethyl acrylate), poly(3-ethoxypropyl acrylate), poly(ethyl acrylate), poly(2-ethylbutyl acrylate), poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate), poly(5-ethyl-2-nonyl acrylate), poly(2-ethylthioethyl acrylate), poly(3-ethylthiopropyl acrylate), poly(heptyl acrylate), poly(2-heptyl acrylate), poly(hexyl acrylate), poly(isobutyl acrylate), poly(isopropyl acrylate), poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate), poly(3-methoxypropyl acrylate), poly(2-methylbutyl acrylate), poly(3-methylbutyl acrylate), poly(2-methyl-7-ethyl-4-undecyl acrylate), poly(2-methylpentyl acrylate), poly(4-methyl-2-pentyl acrylate), poly(4-methylthiobutyl acrylate), poly(2-methylthioethyl acrylate), poly(3-methylthiopropyl acrylate), poly(nonyl acrylate), poly(octyl acrylate), poly(2-octyl acrylate), poly(3-pentyl acrylate), poly(propyl acrylate), poly(hydroxyethyl acrylate), poly(hydroxypropyl acrylate), polyester acrylate, polybutyl acrylate, etc.

Polymethacrylates of 20°C or lower in glass transition temperature include homopolymers such as poly(decyl methacrylate), poly(dodecyl methacrylate), poly(2-ethylhexyl methacrylate), poly(octadecyl methacrylate), poly(octyl methacrylate), poly(tetradecyl methacrylate), poly(n-hexylmethacrylate) and poly(lauryl methacrylate), and copolymers with acrylates.

(2) Unvulcanized rubbers

Natural rubber (NR), and homopolymers and copolymers of butadiene, isoprene, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylates and methacrylates, such as polybutadiene (BR), styrene-butadiene copolymer (SBR), carboxy modified styrene-butadiene copolymer, polyisoprene (NR), polyisobutylene, polychloroprene (CR), polyneoprene, acrylatebutadiene copolymers, methacrylate-butadiene copolymers, acrylate-acrylonitrile copolymers (ANM), isobutyrene-isoprene copolymer (IIR), acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer (NBR), carboxy modified acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer, acrylonitrilechloroprene copolymer, acrylonitrile-isoprene copolymer, ethylene-propylene copolymer (EPM, EPDM), vinylpyridine-styrene-butadiene copolymer, styrene-isoprene copolymer, etc.

Furthermore, poly(1,3-butadiene, poly(2-chloro-1,3-butadiene), poly(2-decyl-1,3-butadiene), poly(2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene), poly(2-ethyl-1,3-butadiene), poly(2-heptyl-1,3-butadiene), poly(2-isopropyl-1,3-butadiene), poly(2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), chlorosulfonated polyethylene, etc.

In addition, modified products of these rubbers, for example, rubbers usually modified by epoxylation, chlorination, or carboxylation, etc., and blends with other polymers can also be used as binder resins.

(3) Polyoxides (polyethers)

Homopolymers, copolymers, etc. obtained by ring-opening polymerization of trioxan, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, 2,3-epoxybutane, 3,4-epoxybutene, 2,3-epoxypentane, 1,2-epoxyhexane, epoxycyclohexane, epoxycycloheptane, epoxycyclooctane, styrene oxide, 2-phenyl-1,2-epoxypropane, tetramethylethylene oxide, epichlorohydrin, epibromohydrin, allyl glycidyl ether, phenyl glycidyl ether, n-butyl glycidyl ether, 1,4-dichloro-2,3-epoxybutane, 2,3-epoxypropionaldehyde, 2,3-epoxy-2-methylpropionaldehyde, 2,3-epoxydiethylacetal, etc.

Polyoxides of 20°C or lower in glass transition temperature include, for example, polyacetaldehyde, poly(butadiene oxide), poly(1-butene oxide), poly(dodecene oxide), poly(ethylene oxide), poly(isobutene oxide), polyformaldehyde, poly(propylene oxide), poly(tetramethylene oxide), poly(trimethylene oxide), etc.

(4) Polyesters

Polyesters obtained by polycondensation of polyhydric alcohols and polycarboxylic acids enumerated below, polyesters obtained by polymerization of polyhydric alcohols and polycarboxylic anhydrides, polyesters obtained by ring-opening polymerization, etc. of lactones, polyesters obtained from the mixtures of these polyhydric alcohols, polycarboxylic acids, polycarboxylic anhydrides, and lactones, and so on.

Polyhydric alcohols include, for example, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,3-butylene glycol, 1,5-pentanediol, 1,6-hexanediol, diethylene glycol, dipropylene glycol, neopentyl glycol, triethylene glycol, p-xylene glycol, hydrogenated bisphenol A, bisphenol hydroxypropyl ether, glycerol, trimethylolethane, trimethylolpropane, trishydroxymethylaminomethane, pentaerythritol, dipentaerythritol, sorbitol, etc.

Polycarboxylic acids and polycarboxylic anhydrides include, for example, phthalic anhydride, isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid, succinic anhydride, adipic acid, azelaic acid, sebacic acid, tetrahydrophthalic anhydride, hexahydrophthalic anhydride, tetrabrmophthalic acid, tetrachlorophthalic anhydride, HET anhydride, himic anhydride, maleic anhydride, fumaric acid, itaconic acid, trimellitic anhydride, methylcyclohexenetricarboxylic anhydride, pyromellitic anhydride, etc.

Lactones include β-propiolactone, γ-butyrolactone, δ-valerolactone, ε-caprolactone, etc.

Polyesters of 20°C or lower in glass transition temperature include, for example, poly[1,4-(2-butene) sebacate], [1,4-(2-butyne) sebacate], poly(decamethylene adipate), poly(ethylene adipate), poly(oxydiethylene adipate), poly(oxydiethylene azelate), poly(oxydiethylene dodecanediate), poly(oxydiethylene glutarate), poly(oxydiethylene heptylmalonate), poly(oxydiethylene nonylmalonate), poly(oxydiethylene octadecanediate), poly(oxydiethylene oxalate), poly(oxydiethylene pentylmalonate), poly(oxydiethylene pimelate), poly(oxydiethylene propylmalonate), poly(oxydiethylene sebacate), poly(oxydiethylene suberate), poly(oxyethylene succinate), poly(pentamethylene adipate), poly(tetramethylene adipate), poly(tetramethylene sebacate), poly(trimethylene adipate), etc.

(5) Polyurethanes

The polyurethanes obtained from the following polyisocyanates and polyhydric alcohols can also be used as binder resins. The polyhydric alcohols include the polyhydric alcohols enumerated above for the polyesters, the following polyhydric alcohols, polyester polyols with hydroxyl groups at both the ends obtained by polycondensation of these polyhydric alcohols and the polycarboxylic acids enumerated above for the polyesters, polyester polyols obtained from lactones, polycarbonate diols, polyether polyols obtained by ring-opening polymerization of propylene oxide and tetrahydrofuran and obtained by modification by epoxy resin, acrylic polyols as copolymers of (meth)acrylic monomers with a hydroxyl group and (meth)acrylates, polybutadiene polyol, etc.

Isocyanates include paraphenylene diisocyanate, 2,4- or 2,6-toluylene diisocyanate (TDI), 4,4-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), tolidine diisocyanate (TODI), xylylene diisocyanate (XDI), hydrogenated xylylene diisocyanate, cyclohexane diisocyanate, metaxylylene diisocyanate (MXDI), hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI or HMDI), lysine diisocyanate (LDI) (also called 4,4'-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate)), hydrogenated TDI (HTDI) (also called methylcyclohexane 2,4(2,6)diisocyanate), hydrogenated XDI (H6XDI) (also called 1,3-(isocynanatomethyl)cyclohexane), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), diphenyl ether isocyanate, trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMDI), tetramethylxylylene diisocyanate, polymethylenepolyphenyl isocyanate, dimeric acid diisocyanate (DDI), triphenylmethane triisocyanate, tris(isocyanatophenyl) thiophosphate, tetramethylxylylene diisocyanate, lysine ester triisocyanate, 1,6,11-undecane triisocyanate, 1,8-diisocyanato-4-isocyanatomethyloctane, 1,3,6-hexamethylene triisocyanate, bicycloheptane triisocyanate, etc., polyhydric alcohol adducts of polyisocyanates, polymers of polyisocyanates, etc.

Typical polyhydric alcohols other than those enumerated above for the polyesters include polypropylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, polytetramethylene glycol, ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer, and tetrahydrofuran-propylene oxide copolymer. Polyester diols include polyethylene adipate, polypropylene adipate, polyhexamethylene adipate, polyneopentyl adipate, polyhexamethylene neopentyl adipate, polyethylene hexamethylene adipate, etc., and also poly-ε-caprolactone diol, polyhexamethylene carbonate diol, polytetramethylene adipate, sorbitol, methyglucocide, sucrose, etc.

Furthermore, various phosphorus-containing polyols, halogen-containing polyols, etc. can also be used as polyols.

The above isocyanates and polyols can be caused to react with each other by publicly known methods to obtain the intended polyurethanes, and these polyurethanes are generally 20°C or lower in glass transition temperature and can be used in the present invention.

(6) Polyamides

Copolymers of the following monomers are included. The monomers are ε-caprolactam, ω-laurolactam, ω-aminoundecanoic acid, hexamethylenediamine, 4,4-bis-aminocyclohexylmethane, 2,4,4-trimethylhexamethylenediamine, isophoronediamine, glycols, isophthalic acid, adipic acid, sebacic acid, dodecanoic diacid, etc.

To give a more detailed description, polyamides can be classified into two major categories; water soluble polyamides and alcohol soluble polyamides. The water soluble polyamides include polyamides containing sulfonic acid groups or sulfonate groups obtained by copolymerizing sodium 3,5-dicarboxybenzenesulfonate as stated in JP-A-48-72250, polyamides with ether bonds obtained by copolymerizing at least one of dicarboxylic acids, diamines and cyclic amides with an ether bond in the molecule as stated in JP-A-49-43465, polyamides containing basic nitrogen obtained by copolymerizing N,N'-di(γ-aminopropyl)piperazine, etc. and polyamides obtained by making those polyamides quaternary by acrylic acid, etc. as stated in Japanese Patent Laid-Open (Kokai) 50-7605, copolymerized polyamides containing a polyether segment of 150 to 1500 in molecular weight proposed in JP-A-55-74537, polyamides obtained by ring-opening polymerization of an α-(N,N'-dialkylamino)-ε-caprolactam or ring-opening copolymerization of an α-(N,N'-dialkylamino)-ε-caprolactam and ε-caprolactam, and so on.

The alcohol soluble polyamides are linear polyamides synthesized from a dibasic fatty acid and a diamine, ω-amino acid, lactam or any of their derivatives by any publicly known method, and homopolymers, copolymers, block polymers, etc. can be used. Typical ones are nylon 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11, 12, 13, 66, 610, 6/10, 13/13, polyamide obtained from metaxylylenediamine and adipic acid, polyamide obtained from trimethylhexamethylenediamine or isophoronediamine and adipic acid, ε-caprolactam/adipic acid/hexamethylenediamine/4,4'-diaminodicyclohexylmethane copolymerized polyamide, ε-caprolactam/adipic acid/hexamethylenediamine/2,4,4'-trimethylhexamethylenediamine copolymerized polyamide, ε-caprolactam/adipic acid/hexamethylenediamine/isophoronediamine copolymerized polyamide, polyamides containing these components. Their N-methylol or N-alkoxymethyl derivatives can also be used.

One or more as a mixture of the above polyamides can be used for the heating insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer of the present invention.

Polyamides of 20°C or lower in glass transition temperature include copolymerized polyamides containing a polyether segment of 150 to 1500 in molecular weight, more specifically, a copolymerized polyamide with amino groups at the ends, containing 30 to 70 wt% of polyoxyethylene and an aliphatic dicarboxylic acid or diamine as components, of 150 to 1500 in the molecular weight of the polyether segment portion.

One or more as a mixture of the above binder resins can be used.

Among the above polymers, those preferably used for the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer of the present invention are polyurethanes, polyesters, vinyl based polymers, and unvulcanized rubbers.

The amount of any binder resin used is preferably 20 to 70 wt%, more preferably 15 to 50 wt% based on the weight of the ingredients of the heat insulating layer or the heat sensitive layer.

The binder resin can be used as unvulcanized, but to obtain practical solvent resistance for the step of printing, it is preferably treated to form a crosslinked structure by a crosslinking agent

The crosslinking agents which can be used in the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer of the present invention include the following:

(1) Isocyanates

Isocyanates enumerated above for the polyurethanes.

(2) Polyfunctional epoxy compounds

Polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ethers, polypropylene glycol diglycidyl ethers, bisphenol A diglycidyl ethers, trimethylolpropane triglycidyl ether, pentaerythritol tetraglycidyl ether, etc.

(3) Polyfunctional acrylate compounds, etc.

The anchoring agent as a component of the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer can be, for example, any publicly known adhesive such as a silane coupling agent, and an organic titanate, etc. can also be used effectively.

For improving coatability, a surfactant can also be added as desired.

Since the imaged area of the printing plate becomes the image area after the heat insulating layer is exposed, it is preferable to let the heat insulating layer contain an additive such as a dye for improving plate inspectability.

The compositions for forming the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer are prepared as solutions, by dissolving them into any proper organic solvent such as DMF, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, dioxane, toluene, xylene or THF. The composition solutions are uniformly applied onto a substrate and heated at a necessary temperature for a necessary time, to form the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer.

The thickness of the heat insulating layer is preferably 0.5 to 50 g/m2, more preferably 2 to 7 g/m2. If the thickness is thinner than 0.5 g/m2, the effect in preventing shape defects and adverse influence of chemicals on the surface of the substrate is poor, and if thicker than 50 g/m2, an economical disadvantage is inevitable.

The thickness of the heat sensitive layer is preferably 0.2 to 3 g/m2, more preferably 0.5 to 2 g/m2. If the thickness is thinner than 0.2 g/m2, coating is technically difficult, and if thicker than 3 g/m2, decomposability becomes very low when an image is formed by irradiation with a laser beam.

The heat sensitive layer used in the present invention is described below in more detail. It is important that the heat sensitive layer efficiently absorbs the laser beam, and is instantaneously partially or wholly decomposed by the heat.

Thus, it is preferable that the heat sensitive layer contain a light-heat converting material and a self oxidizing material.

The light-heat converting material is not especially limited as far as it can absorb light for converting it into heat, and can be selected, for example, from black pigments such as carbon black, aniline black and cyanine black, green pigments based on phthalocyanine or naphthalocyanine, carbon graphite, iron powder, diamine based metal complexes, dithiol based metal complexes, phenolthiol based metal complexes, mercaptophenol based metal complexes, arylaluminum metal salts, crystal water-containing inorganic compounds, copper sulfate, chromium sulfide, silicate compounds, metal oxides such as titanium oxide, vanadium oxide, manganese oxide, iron oxide, cobalt oxide and tungsten oxide, hydroxides and sulfates of these metals, and metallic powders of bismuth, tin, tellurium, iron and aluminum.

Among them, having regard to light-heat conversion rate, economy and handling convenience, carbon black is especially preferable.

Carbon black can be classified, with reference to production methods, into furnace black, channel black, thermal black, acetylene black, lamp black, etc., and among them, furnace black can be preferably used since it is marketed as various types in view of grain size, etc., and is commercially inexpensive.

Marketed carbon black is available in various grain sizes, and the average grain size of primary grains is preferably 15 to 29 nm, more preferably 17 to 26 nm.

If the average grain size of primary grains is smaller than 15 nm, the heat sensitive layer itselftends to be transparent, and cannot efficiently absorb the laser beam, and if larger than 29 nm, the grains cannot be dispersed at a high density, not allowing the blackness of the heat sensitive layer to be intensified, hence not allowing efficient absorption of the laser beam. This finally brings about a problem in that the sensitivity of the printing plate declines.

The primary grain size of carbon black can be measured by the settlement method, microscope method, transmission method, adsorption method, X-ray method, etc. Among them, the use of an electron microscope or X-ray method is preferable. For the X-ray method, an X-ray generator produced by Rigaku Denki, etc. can be used.

For measurement in the state of a printing plate, the plate can be cut into a thin film, and the primary grain size of carbon black can be measured using a transmissive electron microscope.

The oil absorption of carbon black also affects the sensitivity of the printing plate and the viscosity of the solution destined to form the heat sensitive layer.

The oil absorption indicates the structure of carbon black, i.e., the degree of cohesion of grains. If the oil absorption is larger, the grains cohere more greatly, and if the oil absorption decreases, the grains cohere less.

In the heat sensitive layer of the present invention, the oil absorption is preferably 50 ml/100 g to 100 ml/100 g, more preferably 60 ml/100 g to 90 ml/100 g.

If the oil absorption is smaller than 50 ml/100 g, the dispersibility of carbon black declines and the sensitivity of the printing plate is likely to decline. If the oil absorption is larger than 100 ml/100 g, the composition solution becomes high in viscosity and becomes thixotropic and difficult to handle.

The oil absorption refers to the oil absorption in DBP (dibutyl phthalate) specified in ASTMD 2414-70. For measuring the oil absorption, while dibutyl phthalate is added dropwise to 100 g of powdery carbon black, they are kneaded by a spatula, etc., and the amount (ml) of dibutyl phthalate added when the mixture of carbon black and dibutyl phthalate has become pasty is used as an indicator of the oil absorption of carbon black.

The use of electrically conductive carbon black is also effective for enhancing the sensitivity of the plate.

The electric conductivity is preferably in a range of 0.01 to 100 Ω-1 cm-1, more preferably 0.1 to 10 Ω-1 cm-1.

Specifically "CONDUCTEX" 40-220, "CONDUCTEX" 975 BEADS, "CONDUCTEX" 900 BEADS, "CONDUCTEX" SC, "BATTERY BLACK" (produced by Columbian Carbon Nippon), #3000 (produced by Mitsubishi Kasei Corp.), etc. can be preferably used.

It is important that the heat sensitive layer is instantaneously partially or wholly decomposed by the heat generated by the light-heat converting material. To satisfy the thermal decomposability, it is important to include a self oxidizing material. Preferable self oxidizing materials include nitro compounds such as ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, sodium nitrate and nitrocellulose, organic peroxides, azo compounds, diazo compounds and hydrazine derivatives.

Among them, nitrocellulose has a moderate viscosity as a solution since it is a high polymer, and furthermore since it has hydroxyl groups in the molecule, it is especially preferably likely to form a crosslinked structure in the heat sensitive layer.

One of the features of nitrocellulose is that various molecular weights can be selected to suit respective purposes. The nitrocellulose in this case is not that for explosives, but is preferably that for industrial use.

The viscosity of nitrocellulose can be measured according to the method specified in ASTM D 301-72. It is important that the nitrocellulose used in the present invention is 1/16 seconds to 3 seconds, preferably 1/8 second to 1 second, more preferably 1/8 second to 1/2 second in the specified viscosity. If the viscosity is less than 1/16, the printing durability of the printing plate is likely to decline since the nitrocellulose is too low in polymerization degree. If more than 1 second, the viscosity is so high as to inconvenience handling, and the coatability in producing the printing plate declines unpreferably.

The nitrogen content of nitrocellulose also greatly affects the performance of the printing plate.

Nitrocellulose is a straight chain high polymer, and has a structure in which D-glucose as a component of it has 3 hydroxyl groups at the maximum. The nitrogen content is specified by the substitution degree of the hydroxyl groups by nitro groups.

The "nitrogen content" refers to a ratio of the atomic weight of nitrogen to the molecular weight of nitrocellulose and indicates the degree of nitration. A higher nitrogen content means a higher nitration degree.

The nitrogen content can be obtained from the following formula. It can also be obtained by elemental analysis.

   If weight of product (nitrocellulose)/weight of raw material (cellulose) is x, then

   Nitrogen content (%) = 31.1 x (1 - 1/x)

If all the three hydroxyl groups of D-glucose are substituted by nitro groups, the nitrogen content is 14.1%, and if only one is substituted by a nitro group, the nitrogen content is 6.8%.

That is, when the nitrogen content is larger, the number of hydroxyl groups in the molecule is smaller, and it tends to be difficult to form a crosslinked structure in the heat sensitive layer.

So, the nitrocellulose used in the present invention is preferably 11.5% or less, more preferably 6.8% to 11.5%.

If the nitrogen content is smaller than 6.8%, the sensitivity of the printing plate declines, and the solubility in the solvent is also likely to decline. If larger than 11.5%, the number of hydroxyl groups is so small as to make it difficult to form a crosslinked structure in the heat sensitive layer, and as a result, printing durability declines unpreferably.

Since this nitrocellulose is used in combination with carbon black, the ratio is very important.

If the amount of carbon black added is too large or too small against nitrocellulose, no proper printing plate can be obtained.

It is important that the ratio by weight is 1.1 or more of carbon black to 1 of nitrocellulose. If the ratio by weight of carbon black is less than 1.1, the laser beam cannot be efficiently absorbed, to lower the sensitivity of the printing plate. The sum of the weights of carbon black and nitrocellulose is preferably 30 to 90 wt%, more preferably 40 to 70 wt% based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer. If the amount is smaller than 30 wt%, the sensitivity of the printing plate declines, and if larger than 90 wt%, the solvent resistance of the printing plate is likely to decline.

It is also very effective to add a thermal decomposition aid such as urea, urea derivative, zinc dust, lead carbonate, lead stearate or glycollic acid. The amount of the thermal decomposition aid added is preferably 0.02 to 10 wt%, more preferably 0.1 to 5 wt% based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer.

In addition to the above materials, a dye to absorb infrared rays or near infrared rays can also be preferably used as a light-heat converting material.

As the dye, all the dyes with the maximum absorption wavelength in a range of 400 nm to 1200 nm can be used. Preferable dyes include acid dyes, basic dyes, pigments and oil soluble dyes for electronics and recording, based on cyanine, phthalocyanine, phthalocyanine metal complex, naphthalocyanine, naphthalocyanine metal complex, dithiol metal complex, naphthoquinone, anthraquinone, indophenol, indoaniline, pyrylium, thiopyrylium, squalilium, croconium, diphenylmethane, triphenylmethane, triphenylmethane phthalide, triallylmethane, phenothiazine, phenoxazine, fluoran, thiofluoran, xanthene, indolylphthalide, spiropyran, azaphthalide, chromenopyrazole, leucoauramine, rhodaminelactam, quinazoline, diazaxanthene, bislactone, fluorenone, monoazo, ketoneimine, disazo, methine, oxazine, nigrosine, bisazo, bisazostilbene, bisazooxaziazole, bisazofluorenone, bisazohydroxyperinone, azochromium complex salt, trisazotriphenylamine, thioindigo, perylene, nitroso, 1 : 2 type metal complex salt, intermolecular CT, quinoline, quinophthalone and flugide, and also triphenylmethane based leuco pigments, cationic dyes, azo based disperse dyes, benzothiopyran based spiropyran, 3,9-dibromoanthoanthrone, indanthrone, phenolphthalein, sulfophthalein, ethyl violet, methyl orange, fluorescein, methylviologen, methylene blue, dibromobetaine, etc.

Among them, preferably used are dyes for electronics and recording of 700 nm to 900 nm in maximum absorption wavelength such as cyanine dyes, azlenium dyes, squalilium dyes, croconium dyes, azo disperse dyes, bisazostilbene dyes, naphthoquinone dyes, anthraquinone dyes, perylene dyes, phthalocyanine dyes, naphthalocyanine metal complex dyes, dithiolnickel complex dyes, indoaniline metal complex dyes, intermolecular CT dyes, benzothiopyran based spyropyran, and black dyes such as nigrosine dyes.

Among these dyes, those large in molar absorption coefficient can be preferably used. Specifically, ε = 1 x 104 or more is preferable, and 1 x 105 or more is more preferable. If ε is smaller than 1 x 104, the effect of improving sensitivity is hard to obtain.

The heat sensitive layer must have a crosslinked structure to achieve high solvent resistance against printing ink. The crosslinking method can be either thermal crosslinking or photo crosslinking. In the present invention, since the heat sensitive layer is low in light transmittance, photo crosslinking does not allow sufficient reaction to occur. So, thermal crosslinking is preferable.

The polyfunctional crosslinking agents which can be used here to introduce the crosslinked structure include combinations between a polyfunctional isocyanate based compound or polyfunctional epoxy compound and a urea based compound, amine based compound, hydroxyl group-containing compound, carboxylic acid compound or thiol based compound. However, if a polyfunctional isocyanate based compound is used, curing at a high temperature is necessary since the reaction is not completed in a short time, but since the decomposition temperature of nitrocellulose is 180°C, curing at a temperature higher than it cannot be executed. So, the reaction may gradually occur also after production of printing plate, to adversely affect the developability of the printing plate. Therefore, for crosslinking, a combination between a polyfunctional epoxy compound and an amine based compound, amide based compound, hydroxyl group-containing compound, carboxylic acid compound or thiol based compound is preferable.

The polyfunctional epoxy compounds which canbe used here include bisphenol A type epoxy resin, bisphenol F type epoxy resin, and glycidyl ether type epoxy resin.

The amine based compounds which can be used here include butylated urea resin, butylated melamine resin, butylated benzoguanamine resin, butylated urea melamine co-condensation resin, aminoalkyd resin, iso-butylated melamine resin, methylated melamine resin, hexamethoxymethlolmelamine, methylated benzoguanamine resin, butylated benzoguanamine resin, diethylenetriamine, triethylenetriamine, tetraethylenepentamine, diethylaminopropylamine, N-aminoethylpiperazine, metaxylylenediamine, metaphenylenediamine, diaminodiphenylmethane, diaminodiphenylsulfone, isophoronediamine, etc.

The amide based compounds which can be used here include polyamide based hardening agents, dicyandiamide, etc. used as hardening agents of epoxy resin, and the hydroxyl group-containing compounds which can be used here include phenol resin, polyhydric alcohols, etc. The thio based compounds which can be used here include polythiols, etc.

The carboxylic acid compounds which can be preferably used here include phthalic acid, hexahydrophthalic acid, tetrahydrophthalic acid, dodecylsuccinic acid, pyromellitic acid, crotonic acid, maleic acid, fumaric acid, and their anhydrides.

In these cases, it is preferable to use a publicly known catalyst such as a quaternary ammonium salt, KOH, SnCl4, Zn(BF4)2, or imidazole compound, etc. as a catalyst for promoting the reaction.

Among the above crosslinking agents, a combination between a polyfunctional epoxy compound and an amine based compound is more preferable having regard to hardening rate and handling convenience.

Furthermore, a polyfunctional crosslinking agent with an organic silyl group, or amino group-containing monomer can also be preferably used.

The amount of the polyfunctional crosslinking agent used is preferably 1 to 50 wt%, more preferably 3 to 40 wt% based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer. If the amount is smaller than 1 wt%, the solvent resistance of the printing plate is likely to decline, and if larger than 50 wt%, the printing plate becomes hard and is likely to decline in printing durability.

The heat sensitive layer can preferably contain a binder resin for the purpose of improving the storage stability, and the resins which can be used in this case include the resins used for the heat insulating layer, such as polyurethane resin, phenol resin, acrylic resin, alkyd resin, polyester resin, vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate copolymer, vinyl chloride resin, polyvinyl butyral resin, ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, polycarbonate resin, polyacrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer, polyether resin, polyether sulfone resin, milk casein, gelatin, cellulose derivatives such as carboxymethyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, cellulose propyl acetate, cellulose butyl acetate, cellulose triacetate, hydroxypropyl cellulose ether, ethyl cellulose ether and cellulose phosphate, polyvinyl acetate, polystyrene, polystyrene-acrylonitrile copolymer, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide, polyethylene oxide, polyvinyl alcohol-acetal copolymer, polyvinyl acetal, polyvinyl alcohol-polyacetal copolymer, polyvinyl alcohol-polybutyral copolymer, polyvinyl benzal, polyvinyl alcohol, ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer, chlorinated polyolefins such as chlorinated polyethylene and chlorinated polypropylene, etc. Among them, cellulose derivatives such as cellulose acetate, chlorine-containing copolymers such as polyvinyl chloride-vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, polyurethane resin and acrylic resin can be preferably used.

In addition to the above thermally decomposable compounds, polyacetylene, polyaniline, etc. known as electrically conductive polymers can also be preferably used.

Furthermore, the heat sensitive layer can also contain such additives as antiseptic, antihalation dye, defoaming agent, antistatic agent, dispersing agent, emulsifier and surfactant.

It is especially preferable to add a fluorine based surfactant to improve coatability. The amounts of these additives are usually 10 wt% or less based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer.

If an addition type silicone rubber is used for the silicone rubber layer, a compound with ethylenic unsaturated double bonds can be added for improving the adhesiveness between the heat sensitive layer and the silicone rubber layer. The compounds with ethylenic unsaturated double bonds which can be used here include the following compounds, and especially epoxy acrylates are especially preferable. The amount of the compound with ethylenic unsaturated double bonds is preferably 0.5 to 30 wt% based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer.

(1) Esterification products between a polyfunctional hydroxyl group-containing compound and acrylic acid or methacrylic acid.

The polyfunctional hydroxyl group-containing compounds which can be used here include ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dipropylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,6-hexanediol, 1,8-octanediol, 1,9-nonanediol, hydroquinone, dihydroxyanthraquinone, bisphenol A, bisphenol S, resol resin, pyrogallolacetone resin, hydroxystyrene copolymers, glycerol, pentaerythritol, dipentaerythritol, trimethylolpropane, polyvinyl alcohol, cellulose, cellulose derivatives, and homopolymers and copolymers of hydroxyacrylates and hydroxymethacrylates. Any of these polyfunctional hydroxyl group-containing compounds and acrylic acid or methacrylic acid can be esterified by any publicly known reaction method, to obtain the intended compound. In this case, it is necessary to execute the reaction at a ratio to let one molecule contain two or more ethylenic unsaturated groups.

(2) Epoxy acrylates obtained by letting an epoxy compound and acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, glycidyl acrylate or glycidyl methacrylate react with each other.

The epoxy compounds which can be used here include the compounds obtained by letting an epihalohydrin react with any of the hydroxyl group-containing compounds enumerated in the above (1).

Those with ethylene oxide or propylene oxide added to the hydroxyl group of any of the above hydroxy group-containing compounds can also be similarly used.

Any of these epoxy compounds can be caused to react with acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, glycidyl acrylate or glycidyl methacrylate by any publicly known method, to obtain the intended epoxy acrylate.

(3) Compounds obtained by letting an amine compound and glycidyl acrylate, glycidyl methacrylate, acrylic acid chloride or methacrylic acid chloride react with each other.

The amine compounds which can be used here include monovalent amine compounds such as octylamine and laurylamine, aliphatic polyamine compounds such as dioxyethylenediamine, trioxyethylenediamine, tetraoxyethylenediamine, pentaoxyethylenediamine, hexaoxyethylenediamine, heptaoxyethylenediamine, octaoxyethylenediamine, nonaoxyethylenediamine, monoxypropylenediamine, dioxypropylenediamine, trioxypropylenediamine, tetraoxypropylenediamine, pentaoxypropylenediamine, hexaoxypropylenediamine, heptaoxypropylenediamine, octaoxypropylenediamine, nonaoxypropylenediamine, polymethylenediamine, polyetherdiamine, diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine and tetraethylpentamine, and polyamine compounds such as m-xylylenediamine, p-xylylenediamine, m-phenylenediamine, diaminodiphenyl ether, benzidine, 4,4'-bis(o-toluidine), 4,4'-thiodianiline, o-phenylenediamine, dianisidine, 4-chloro-o-phenylenediamine, and 4-methoxy-6-methyl-m-phenylenediamine. Any ofthese amine compounds can be caused to react with glycidyl acrylate, glycidyl methacrylate, acrylic acid chloride or methacrylic acid chloride by any publicly known method, to obtain the intended compound.

(4) Compounds obtained by letting a compound with a carboxyl group and glycidyl acrylate or glycidyl methacrylate react with each other.

The carboxyl group-containing compounds which can be used here include malonic acid, succinic acid, malic acid, thiomalic acid, racemic acid, citric acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, suberic acid, azelaic acid, sebacic acid, maleic acid, fumaric acid, itaconic acid, dimeric acid, trimellitic acid, carboxy modified unvulcanized rubber, etc.

Any of these compounds with a carboxyl group can be caused to react with glycidyl acrylate or glycidyl methacrylate by any publicly known method, to obtain the intended compound.

(5) Urethane acrylates

Glycerol diacrylate isophorone diisocyanate urethane prepolymer, pentaerythritol triacrylate hexamethylene diisocyanate urethane prepolymer, etc.

One or more as a mixture of the above compounds with two or more ethylenic unsaturated double bonds in one molecule can be used.

As the case may be, to improve the adhesiveness with the addition type silicone rubber layer laminated above, silica powder or hydrophobic silica powder with its grain surfaces treated by a silane coupling agent containing a (meth)acryloyl group or allyl group can be added by 20 wt% or less based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer.

The composition to form the above heat sensitive layer is dissolved into a proper organic solvent such as DMF, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, dioxane, toluene, xylene, ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol diethyl ether, acetone, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol, diacetone alcohol, benzyl alcohol, butyl butyrate or ethyl lactate, to prepare a composition solution. The composition solution is uniformly applied onto a substrate, and heated at a necessary temperature for a necessary time, to form the heat sensitive layer.

Its thermosetting must be executed in a temperature range not to decompose the thermally decomposable nitrocellulose, usually at 180°C or lower, and because of this, it is preferable to use any of the above enumerated catalysts together.

The directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate is finally developed, to remove the heat sensitive layer and the silicone rubber layer simultaneously at the laser exposed area, for forming an inking area. Development can be executed using water or a liquid with water as the main component. In this case, the heat sensitive layer must be perfectly removed. Since the heat sensitive layer also has ink deposited on it, the remaining heat sensitive layer does not affect the performance of the plate itself, but it makes it difficult to visually confirm the pattern, i.e., lowers the plate inspectability disadvantageously. So, in the present invention, if the heat sensitive layer contains a material which can be dissolved in or swollen by water, the directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate obtained can be improved in developability and excellent in plate inspectability. The material to be added into the heat sensitive layer to achieve this purpose is not especially limited as far as it is well dispersed in the composition of the heat sensitive layer, but a salt, monomer, oligomer or resin, etc. can be preferably used. The materials which can be dissolved in or swollen by water are enumerated below, but the present invention is not limited thereto or thereby.

(1) Natural proteins

At least one protein selected from casein, gelatin, soybean protein, albumin, etc. More specifically, they include milk casein, acid casein, rennet casein, ammonia casein, potassium casein, borax casein, glue, gelatin, gluten, soybean lecithin, soybean protein, collagen, etc.

(2) Alginates

Ammonium alginate, potassium alginate, sodium alginate, etc.

(3) Starch, etc.

Starch alone and graft polymers of starch and a synthetic monomer such as acrylic acid.

(4) Cellulose, etc.

Cellulose alone and graft polymers of cellulose and a synthetic monomer such as acrylic acid. More specifically, they include carboxylated methyl cellulose, methyl cellulose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose, cellulose xanthogenate, etc.

(5) Hyaluronic acid, etc.

Polymers such as natural polysaccharides as disclosed in JP-B-61-8083, Japanese Patent Laid-Open (Kokai) Nos. 58-56692, 60-49797, etc.

(6) Polyvinyl alcohol, etc.

Polyvinyl alcohol alone, ketonation product of methyl acrylate-vinyl acetate copolymer, vinyl pyrrolidone based copolymers, etc.

(7) Acrylates, etc.

Monomers, polymers and crosslinked products of α,β-unsaturated compounds with one or more groups such as carboxyl groups, carboxylic acid groups, carboxylates, carboxylic acid amides, carboxylic acid imides and carboxylic anhydrides in the molecule.

Said α,β-unsaturated compounds include acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, acrylic acid amide, methacrylic acid amide, maleic anhydride, maleic acid, maleic acid amide, maleic acid imide, itaconic acid, crotonic acid, fumaric acid, mesaconic acid, etc. Any of these monomers can be radical-polymerized by any publicly known method, to obtain the intended homopolymer or copolymer. The homopolymer or copolymer can be caused to react with a compound such as the hydroxide, oxide or carbonate, etc. of an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal, ammonia or amine, etc., to be enhanced in hydrophilicity.

(8) Hydrophilic epoxy compounds

Sorbitol polyglycidyl ether, sorbitan polyglycidyl ether, polyglycerol polyglycidyl ether, pentaerythritol polyglycidyl ether, diglycerol polyglycidyl ether, triglycidyl tris(2-hydroxyethyl) isocyanurate, glycerol polyglycidyl ether, trimethylolpropane polyglycidyl ether, neopentyl glycol diglycidyl ether, ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether, propylene glycol diglycidyl ether, polypropylene glycol diglycidyl ether, phenol ethylene oxide added glycidyl ether, lauryl alcohol ethylene oxide added glycidyl ether, adipic acid diglycidyl ester, etc.

(9) Water soluble acrylates, etc.

Ethylene glycol diacrylate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, diethylene glycol diacrylate, diethylene glycol dimethacrylate, polyethylene glycol diacrylate, polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate, propylene glycol diacrylate, propylene glycol dimethacrylate, dipropylene glycol diacrylate, dipropylene glycol dimethacrylate, polypropylene glycol diacrylate, polypropylene glycol dimethacrylate, reaction product of p-xylylenediamine and glycidyl methacrylate, etc.

Among the above materials which can be dissolved in or swollen by water, salts include reaction products between a material of (2), (6) or (7) and an alkaline earth metal. Monomers and oligomers include materials of (2), (7), (8) and (9). Resins include the materials of (1), (3), (4), (5), (6) and (7).

Among these hydrophilic compounds, especially resins, and crosslinkable monomers, oligomers and resins can also be used as binders, and are economically preferable since it is not necessary to let the heat sensitive layer contain another binder.

The amount of the hydrophilic compound added to the heat sensitive layer is preferably 10 to 40 wt%. If the amount is smaller than 10 wt%, the intended effect of improving developability cannot be obtained, and if larger than 40 wt%, the heat sensitive layer is unpreferably likely to be swollen and removed at the non-exposed area which should remain after completion of development.

The apparatuses used to form the heat insulating layer, heat sensitive layer and silicone rubber layer include a slit die coater, direct gravure coater, offset gravure coater, reverse roll coater, natural roll coater, air knife coater, roll blade coater, vari-bar roll blade coater, two-stream coater, rod coater, dip coater, curtain coater, etc. In view of film accuracy, productivity and cost, a slit die coater, gravure coater and roll coater are especially preferable.

The directly imageable waterless planographic printing plate can be prepared by coating with the above mentioned respective layers.

The "optical density" in this specification refers to the value measured by Macbeth densitometer RD-514 using Wratten filter No. 106.

It is important that the heat sensitive layer used in the present invention efficiently absorbs the laser beam and is instantaneously partially or wholly evaporated or fused by its heat.

For efficient absorption of a laser beam, the absorption rate at the wavelength (about 800 nm) of the semiconductor laser used as a light source is important.

As an indicator of the absorption rate for the light of about 800 nm, the optical density of the heat sensitive layer is measured. If the optical density is higher, the laser beam can be more efficiently absorbed. The optical density is preferably 0.6 to 2.3, more preferably 0.8 to 2.0 If the optical density is lower than 0.6, the laser beam cannot be efficiently absorbed, and as a result, the sensitivity of the printing plate is likely to decline. If higher than 2.3, the film thickness becomes so thick as to require extra energy for forming the image, and the sensitivity declines.

The silicone rubber layer is described below. For the silicone rubber layer, all the silicone compositions used in the conventional waterless planographic printing plates can be used.

The silicone rubber layer can be obtained by sparsely crosslinking a linear organopolysiloxane (preferably dimethylpolysiloxane), and a typical silicone rubber layer has a component represented by the following formula (I):

(where n stands for an integer of 2 or more; R stands for an alkyl group with 1 to 10 carbon atoms, aryl group or cyanoalkyl group; it is preferable that 40% or less of all the groups represented by R are vinyl groups, phenyl groups, halogenated vinyl groups, halogenated phenyl groups, and that 60% or more of all the groups represented by R are methyl groups; and the molecular chain has at least one or more hydroxyl groups at the ends of the chain or as side chains.)

The silicone rubber layer used in the printing plate of the present invention uses a silicone rubber to be condensation-crosslinked as described below (RTV or LTV type silicone rubber). As such a silicone rubber, a silicone rubber in which some of R groups of the organopolysiloxane chain are substituted by H can also be used, but the silicone rubber used is usually crosslinked by condensation between the end groups represented by any of the formulae (II), (III) and (IV). There is also a case where an excessive amount of a crosslinking agent is added for presence.

(where R is as defined before, and R1 and R2 stand for, respectively independently, a monovalent lower alkyl group; and Ac stands for an acetyl group.)

To the silicone rubber to be crosslinked by condensation, a metal carboxylate of tin, zinc, lead, calcium or manganese, etc., for example, dibutyltin laurate, tin (II) octoate or naphtenate or chloroplatinic acid is added as a catalyst.

To the composition, any publicly known tackifier such as an alkenyltrialkoxysilane can be added as desired, and a hydroxyl group-containing organopolysiloxane or hydrolyzable functional group-containing silane (or siloxane) can be added as desired, as a component of the condensation type silicone rubber layer. Furthermore, to enhance the rubber strength, a publicly known filler such as silica can also be added as desired.

To the composition, for enhancing the adhesiveness to the heat sensitive layer, any of the publicly known silane coupling agents described before can also be added effectively.

If a silane coupling agent is added into the silicone rubber layer, it is not necessary to form a silane coupling agent layer additionally.

Furthermore, in the present invention, in addition to said condensation type silicone rubber, an addition type silicone rubber can also be used.

The addition type silicone rubber which can be preferably used is obtained by crosslinking and hardening a hydrogenpolysiloxane with Si-H bonds and a vinylpolysiloxane with CH=CH bonds by a platinum based catalyst as shown below. (1) Organopolysiloxane with at least two alkenyl groups (desirably vinyl groups) directly connected to silicon atoms in one molecule 100 parts by weight (2) Organohydrogenpolysiloxane with at least two groups represented by formula (V) in one molecule 0.1 to 1000 parts by weight (3) Addition catalyst 0.00001 to 10 parts by weight (4) Silane coupling agent 0.001 to 10 parts by weight

The alkenyl groups of the ingredient (1) can be located at the ends or intermediate positions of the molecular chain, and organic groups other than alkenyl groups are substituted or non-substituted alkyl groups and aryl groups. The ingredient (1) may have a slight amount of hydroxyl groups. The ingredient (2) reacts with the ingredient (1) to form a silicone rubber layer, and acts to give adhesiveness to the heat sensitive layer. The hydroxyl groups of the ingredient (2) can be located at the ends or intermediate positions of the molecular chain, and organic groups other than hydrogen can be selected from those stated for the ingredient (1). It is preferable that 60% or more of the organic groups of the ingredients (1) and (2) are methyl groups in view of higher ink repellency. The molecular structures of the ingredients (1) and (2) can be of straight chain, cyclic or of branched chain, and it is preferable in view of the physical properties of the rubber that the molecular weight of at least either of the ingredients (1) and (2) is more than 1000. It is more preferable that the molecular weight of the ingredient (2) exceeds 1000. The ingredient (1) can be selected, for example, from α,ω-divinylpolydimethylsiloxane, (methylvinylsiloxane) (dimethylsiloxane) copolymer with methyl groups at both the ends, etc. The ingredient (2) can be selected, for example, from polydimethylsiloxane with hydroxyl groups at both the ends, α,ω-dimethylpolymethylhydrogensiloxane, (methylhydrogensiloxane) (dimethylsiloxane) copolymer with methyl groups at both the ends, cyclic polymethylhydrogensiloxane, etc. The addition catalyst as the ingredient (3) can be selected from publicly known catalysts as desired, and especially a platinum compound such as platinum, platinum chloride, chloroplatinic acid or olefin coordinated platinum is desirable. The silane coupling agent as the ingredient (4) is preferably a compound with an unsaturated bond to react with the hydrogensiloxane in the addition type silicone rubber composition and with a functional group (e.g., alkoxy group, oxime group, acetoxy group, chloro group, epoxy group, etc.) to react with the hydrogel groups and amino groups in the heat sensitive layer, or a composition containing the compound.

As the above compound, usually any of all the compositions marketed as primers for addition type silicone rubber can be used.

Examples of the primers for addition type silicone rubber are "ME151" produced by Toshiba Silicone K.K., and "SH2260", "DY39-012", "DY39-067", "DY39-080", "Primer X", "Primer-Y", etc. produced by Toray Dow Corning Silicone K.K.

Most of them contain an unsaturated bond-containing silane coupling agent as the main component and a small amount of a catalyst as an additive, and diluted by a solvent.

An unsaturated bond-containing silane coupling agent can also be used as it is.

In this case, the unsaturated bond-containing silane coupling agent can be selected from vinylsilanes, allylsilanes, (meth)acrylsilanes, etc.

The vinylsilanes include, for example, vinyltrimethoxysilane, vinyltriethoxysilane, vinyltris(2-methoxyethoxy)silane, divinyldimethoxysilane, divinyldiethoxysilane, divinyldi(2-methoxyethoxy)silane, trivinylmethoxysilane, trivinylethoxysilane, trivinyl(2-methoxyethoxy)silane, etc.

The allylsilanes include, for example, allyltrimethoxysilane, allyltriethoxysilane, allyltris(2-methoxyethoxy)silane, diallyldimethoxysilane, diallyldiethoxysilane, diallyldi(2-methoxyethoxy)silane, triallylmethoxysilane, triallylethoxysilane, triallyl(2-methoxyethoxy)silane, etc.

The (meth)acrylsilanes include, for example, 3-(meth)acryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-(meth)acryloxypropyltriethoxysilane, di(3-(meth)acryloxypropyl)-dimethoxysilane, di(3-(meth)acryloxypropyl)diethoxysilane, tri(3-(meth)acryloxypropyl)methoxysilane, tri(3-(meth)acryloxypropyl)ethoxysilane, etc.

Among them, vinyltrimethoxysilane, vinyltriethoxysilane, allyltrimethoxy-silane and allyltriethoxysilane can be preferably used.

The amount of any of the primers for addition type silicone rubber and silane coupling agents is preferably 0.01 to 5 wt%, more preferably 0.05 to 2 wt% as a solute component based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer.

If the amount is smaller than 0.01 wt%, the adhesiveness to the silicone rubber layer is likely to decline, and if larger than 5 wt%, the stability of the solution is likely to decline.

As the catalyst, a reaction catalyst for addition type silicone is used.

For the catalyst, almost all the transition metal complexes of group VIII can be used, but in general, platinum compounds can be preferably used since they are highest in reaction efficiency and good in solubility.

Among platinum compounds, preferably used are platinum, platinum chloride, chloroplatinic acid, olefin coordinated platinum, alcohol modified platinum complex, and methylvinylpolysiloxane platinum complex.

Adding a catalyst for promoting the dealcoholation reaction of the silane coupling agent (reaction with the hydroxyl groups in the heat sensitive layer) is also effective.

As the catalyst, a tin based compound or a titanium based compound can be preferably used.

The tin based compounds which can be used here include dibutyltin diacetate, dibutyltin dilaurate, dibutyltin dioctoate, tin octylate, dioctyltin dioctoate, dioctyltin oxide, dioctyltin dilaurate and tin stearate. The titanium based compounds which can be used here include tetramethyl titanate, tetraethyl titanate, tetrapropyl titanate, tetraisopropyl titanate, tetrabutyl titanate, etc.

Among them, dibutyltin diacetate, dibutyltin dilaurate, dibutyltin dioctoate, tetraisopropyl titanate, tetrabutyl titanate, etc. can be preferably used.

The amount of the catalyst added is preferably 0.001 to 5 wt%, more preferably 0.01 to 1 wt% as solid content based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer.

If the amount is smaller than 0.001 wt%, the adhesiveness to the heat sensitive layer is likely to decline, and if larger than 5 wt%, the stability of the solution is likely to decline.

To control the hardening rate of the composition, a crosslinking inhibitor can also be added, which can be selected from organopolysiloxanes containing vinyl groups such as tetracyclo(methylvinyl)siloxane, alcohols containing a carbon-carbon triple bond, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methanol, ethanol and propylene glycol monomethyl ether. In the case of the above composition, when three ingredients are mixed, addition reaction occurs, and hardening begins. It is characteristic that the hardening speed becomes sharply high according to the rise of reaction temperature. So, in order to elongate the pot life until the rubberization of the composition and to shorten the hardening time on the heat sensitive layer, it is preferable in view of the stability of the adhesiveness to the heat sensitive layer that the composition is hardened in a temperature range not to change the properties of the substrate or the heat sensitive layer, and that a high temperature is kept until perfect hardening is achieved. The thickness of the silicone rubber layer is preferably 0.5 to 50 g/m2, more preferably 0.5 to 10 g/m2. If the thickness is smaller than 0.5 g/m2, the ink repellency of the printing plate is likely to decline, and if larger than 50 g/m2, an economical disadvantage is inevitable.

As the substrate of the directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate as described above, a dimensionally stable sheet is used. The dimensionally stable sheets which can be suitably used here include those used for conventional printing sheets. These substrates include paper, paper laminated with a plastic (e.g., polyethylene, polypropylene or polystyrene, etc.), metallic sheets of aluminum (including an aluminum alloy), zinc, copper, etc., plastic films of cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene, polyester, polyamide, polyimide, polystyrene, polypropylene, polycarbonate, polyvinyl acetal, etc., and paper and plastic films laminated or vapor-deposited with any of the above metals, and so on. Of these substrates, an aluminum sheet is especially preferable since it is dimensionally very stable and inexpensive. A polyethylene terephthalate film used as a substrate for short run printing can also be preferably used.

For protecting the silicone rubber layer formed on the surface of the directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate composed as above, a plane or roughened thin protective film can be laminated on the surface of the silicone rubber layer, or a coating film of a polymer soluble in the development solvent as described in Japanese Patent Laid-Open (Kokai) No. 5-323588 can also be formed. Especially when a protective film is laminated, a printing plate can also be prepared by forming an image by a laser from above the protective film, and removing the protective film, to form a pattern on the printing plate by the so-called removal development.

The method for producing a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate of the present invention is described below. A substrate is coated with a composition destined to form a heat insulating layer as required, by using any of the apparatuses described before, and the composition is hardened at 100 to 300°C for several minutes. Then, the heat insulating layer is further coated with a composition destined to form a heat sensitive layer, and the composition is dried at 50 to 180°C for several minutes, and thermally cured as required. The heat sensitive layer is further coated with a silicone rubber composition, and the composition is heat-treated at 50 to 150°C for several minutes, to be hardened as rubber.

Subsequently as required, a protective film is laminated or a protective layer is formed.

The directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate obtained in this manner is exposed to an image using a laser beam after removing the protective film or from above the remaining protective film.

For exposure, usually a laser beam is used. As the light source in this case, various lasers of 300 nm to 1500 nm in wavelength can be used, which include Ar ion laser, Kr ion laser, He-Ne laser, He-Cd laser, ruby laser, glass laser, semiconductor laser, YAG laser, titanium sapphire laser, dye laser, nitrogen laser, metal vapor laser, etc. Among them, a semiconductor laser is preferable, since it is downsized due to the technical progress in recent years, and is economically more advantageous than other lasers.

The directly imageable waterless planographic printing plate exposed as described above is subjected, as required, to removal development or ordinary solvent development.

The developers which can be used in the present invention include water, water containing any of the following polar solvents, and any one or more as a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons (hexane, heptane, "Isopar E, G and H" (trade names of isoparaffin based hydrocarbons produced by ESSO), gasoline, kerosene, etc.), aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene, xylene, etc.), halogenated hydrocarbons (trichlene, etc.) respectively with at least one of the following polar solvents added.

Alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dipropylene glycol, tripropylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, 1,3-butylene glycol, 2,3-butylene glycol, hexylene glycol, 2-ethyl-1,3-hexanediol, etc.)

Ethers (ethylene glycol monoethyl ether, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, diethylene glycol monobutyl ether, diethylene glycol monohexyl ether, diethylene glycol mono-2-ethylhexyl ether, triethylene glycol monoethyl ether, tetraethylene glycol monoethyl ether, propylene glycol monomethyl ether, dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, tripropylene glycol monomethyl ether, dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, etc.)

Ketones (acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, diacetone alcohol, etc.)

Esters (ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, methyl lactate, ethyl lactate, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate, diethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, diethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, etc.)

Carboxylic acids (2-ethylbutyric acid, caproic acid, caprylic acid, 2-ethylhexanoic acid, capric acid, oleic acid, lauric acid, etc.)

The above developer composition can contain a publicly known surfactant as desired. Furthermore, an alkaline material such as sodium carbonate, monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, diglycolamine, monoglycolamine, triethanolamine, sodium silicate, potassium silicate, potassium hydroxide or sodium borate can also be added.

To the developer, any publicly known basic dye, acid dye or oil soluble dye such as Crystal Violet or Victoria Pure Blue, Astrazon Red, etc. can also be added, for dyeing the image area concurrently with development.

For development, a nonwoven fabric, absorbent cotton, cloth or sponge, etc. impregnated with such a developer can be used to wipe the plate surface, to execute development.

Furthermore, for favorable development, an automatic processing machine as described in JP-A-63-163357 can be used to pretreat the plate surface by the developer and subsequently to rub the plate surface by a rotary brush while showering with tap water, etc.

Even if hot water or water vapor is used instead of the developer, to be jetted onto the plate surface, development can be executed.

The present invention is described below in more detail in reference to examples, but is not limited thereto or thereby.

The following testing methods were used for measuring tensile properties according to JIS K 6301.

(Method for measuring the tensile properties of a heat insulating layer)

A glass sheet was coated with a heat insulating solution, and the solvent was volatilized The remaining composition was hardened by heating at 180°C. Then, the formed sheet was removed from the glass sheet, as an about 100 µ thick sheet. From the sheet, strip samples of 5 mm x 40 mm were cut off and Tensilon RTM-100 (produced by Orientech K.K.) was used to measure the initial elastic modulus, 10% stress and breaking elongation at a tensile speed of 20 cm/min.

(Method for measuring the tensile properties of a heat sensitive layer)

A glass sheet was coated with a solution destined to form a heat sensitive layer, and the solvent was volatilized. The remaining composition was hardened by heating at 150°C, to form a heat sensitive layer. Subsequently as described for the heat insulating layer, the initial elastic modulus, 5% stress and breaking elongation were measured.

(Method for measuring the tensile properties of a laminate consisting of a heat insulating layer and a heat sensitive layer)

A glass sheet was coated with a heat insulating layer under the conditions as described above, and further coated with a heat sensitive layer on the heat insulating layer under the conditions as described above. Subsequently as described for the heat insulating layer, the initial elastic modulus, 5% stress and breaking elongation were measured.

Furthermore, a composition consisting of a binder resin and a crosslinking agent only in a heat sensitive layer was heated at 150°C, and Tg was measured using a dilatometer.

Example 1

A 0.24 mm thick degreased aluminum sheet was coated with a heat insulating solution with the following composition, and dried at 230°C for 2 minutes, to form a 5 g/m2 thick heat insulating layer. (a) Polyurethane resin "Miractran" P22S (produced by Nippon Miractran K.K.) 100 parts by weight (b) Blocked isocyanate "Takenate B830" (produced by Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 20 parts by weight (c) Epoxy&peseta;phenol&peseta;urea resin "SJ9372" (produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 8 parts by weight (d) Dibutyltin diacetate 0.5 part by weight (e) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (f) Dimethylformamide 720 parts by weight

The heat insulating layer was further coated with the following composition destined to be a heat sensitive layer, and dried at 130°C for 1 minute, to form a 2 g/m2 thick heat sensitive layer. (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC" produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) 24 parts by weight (b) Carbon black 30 parts by weight (c) Polyurethane ("Sanprene" LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 30 parts by weight (d) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (e) Epoxy acrylate ("Denacol Acrylate" DA-314, produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 15 parts by weight (g) Diethylenetriamine 5 parts by weight (g) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

In succession, the heat sensitive layer was coated with a silicone rubber solution with the following composition, and dried at 120°C for 2 minutes, to form a 3 g/m2 thick silicone rubber layer. (a) Vinylpolydimethylsiloxane 100 parts by weight (b) Hydrogensiloxane 12 parts by weight (c) Platinum catalyst 0.2 part by weight (d) Hardening retarder 2 parts by weight (e) Allyltrimethoxysilane 0.5 part by weight (f) "Isopar E" (produced by Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1200 parts by weight

Onto the laminate obtained as above, an 8 µm thick polyester film "Lumirror" (produced by Toray Industries, Inc.) was laminated using a calender roller, to obtain a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate.

Subsequently, the "Lumirror" film was removed from the original printing plate, and the plate was pulse-exposed to a laser beam of 20 µm in diameter for 10 µs using a semiconductor laser (SLD-304XT, 1 W in output, 809 nm in wavelength, produced by Sony Corp.) mounted on an X-Y table. The laser output was changed as desired by an LD pulse modulation drive, the laser power on the plate surface was measured.

In succession, the plate surface was rubbed by a cotton pad impregnated with a developer with the following composition, for development, and the image reproducibility was visually evaluated using an optical microscope. (a) Water 80 parts by weight (b) Diethylene glycol mono-2-ethylhexyl ether 20 parts by weight

The obtained printing plate was installed on a four-color printing machine, Komori Sprint 425BP (produced by Komori Corporation), and coat paper was printed using inks for a waterless planographic printing plate. The number of sheets printed until the silicone rubber layer was peeled to form pinholes in the non-image area, soiling the paper surface, was identified as an indicator of printing durability.

Example 2

A waterless planographic printing plate was produced as described in Example 1, except that the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer were formed using the following compositions, and the image reproducibility and printing durability were evaluated as described in Example 1. Composition of heat insulating layer (a) Epoxy&peseta;phenol resin "Kancoat" 90T-25-3094 (produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Polyurethane ("Sanprene" LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 20 parts by weight (d) Dimethylformaide 85 parts by weight
Composition of heat sensitive layer (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC", produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) 24 parts by weight (b) Carbon black 30 parts by weight (c) Polyurethane ("Sanprene" LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 45 parts by weight (d) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (e) Epoxy acrylate ("Denacol Acrylate" DA-314, produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 15 parts by weight (f) Diethylenetriamine 5 parts by weight (g) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

Example 3

A waterless planographic printing plate was produced as described in Example 1, except that the heat sensitive layer was formed using the following composition, and the image reproducibility and printing durability were evaluated as described in Example 1. (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC", produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) 24 parts by weight (b) Carbon black 30 parts by weight (c) Polyurethane ("Sanprene" LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (d) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (e) Diethylenetriamine 5 parts by weight (f) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

Comparative example 1

A waterless planographic printing plate was produced as described in Example 1, except that the heat insulating layer, heat sensitive layer and ink repellent layer were formed using the following compositions, and the image reproducibility and printing durability were evaluated as described in Example 1. Composition of heat insulating layer (a) Epoxy&peseta;phenol resin "Kancoat" 90T-25-3094 (produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Dimethylformamide 85 parts by weight
Composition of heat sensitive layer (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC" produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) 24 parts by weight (b) Carbon black 30 parts by weight (c) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (d) Epoxy acrylate ("Denacol Acrylate" DA-314, produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 15 parts by weight (e) Diethyltriamine 5 parts by weight (f) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight
Composition of ink repellent layer (a) Polydimethylsiloxane (about 35,000 in molecular weight, with hydroxyl groups at the ends) 100 parts by weight (b) Ethyltriacetoxysilane 3 parts by weight (c) Dibutyltin diacetate 0.1 part by weight (d) "Isopar G" (produced by Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1200 parts by weight

Comparative example 2

A waterless planographic printing plate was produced as described in Comparative Example 1, except that the heat sensitive layer was formed using the following composition, and the image reproducibility and printing durability were evaluated as described in Example 1. (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC", produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) 24 parts by weight (b) Carbon black 30 parts by weight (c) Polyester ("Nichigo Polyester" TP-220, producedby The Nippon Synthetic Chemical Industry Co., Ltd.) 5 parts by weight (d) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemical Industries, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (e) Epoxy acrylate ("Denacol Acrylate" DA-314, produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 15 parts by weight (f) Diethyltriamine 5 parts by weight (g) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

Measured tensile properties of the heat insulating layers, heat sensitive layers and laminates consisting of a heat insulating layer and a heat sensitive layer, of Examples 1 to 3 and Comparative Examples 1 and 2 are shown in Table 1, and the results of evaluation of the image reproducibility and printing durability and measured Tg values of the binder resins and crosslinking agents in the respective heat insulating layers are shown in Table 2.

As shown in Table 2, it can be seen that if the tensile properties of the heat insulating layer, heat sensitive layer or the laminate consisting of a heat insulating layer and a heat sensitive layer conform to the specified ranges, the printing durability of the directly imageable waterless planographic printing plate can be enhanced.

Examples 4 to 9

In the following examples, the blackness was visually evaluated with reference to five stages with the blackness of the printing plate produced by Vulcan XC-72 as the 3rd stage, and with the highest blackness as the 5th stage.

A 0.24 mm thick degreased aluminum plate was coated with a heat insulating solution with the following composition, dried at 230°C for 1 minute, to form a 3 g/m2 thick heat insulating layer. (a) Kancoat 90T-25-3094 (epoxyphenol resin, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Polyurethane ("Sanprene" LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 20 parts by weight (d) Dimethylformamide 85 parts by weight

The photosensitive layer was coated with the following composition destined to be a heat sensitive layer, and dried at 130°C for 1 minute, to form a 2 g/m2 thick heat sensitive layer. (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC", produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) 24 parts by weight (b) Carbon black(Table 3) (c) Polyester resin ("Vylon 300", produced by Toyobo Co., Ltd.) 30 parts by weight (d) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (e) Epoxy acrylate ("Denacol Acrylate" DA-314, produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 15 parts by weight (f) Diethylenetriamine 5 parts by weight (g) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

In succession, the photosensitive layer was coated with a silicone rubber solution with the following composition, and dried at 120°C for 2 minutes, to form a 3 g/m2 thick silicone rubber. (a) Vinylpolydimethylsiloxane 100 parts by weight (b) Hydrogensiloxane 12 parts by weight (c) Platinum catalyst 0.2 part by weight (d) Hardening retarder 2 parts by weight (e) Silicone primer "DY39-067" (produced by Toray Dow Corning Silicone K.K.) 0.1 part by weight (f) "Isopar E" (produced by Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1200 parts by weight

Onto the laminate obtained as described above, an 8 µm thick polyester film "Lumirror" (produced by Toray Industries, Inc.) was laminated using a calender roller, to obtain a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate.

Comparative examples 3 to 5

Printing plates were produced as described in Example 4, except that the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer were formed using the following compositions. Composition of heat insulating layer (a) Kancoat 90T-25-3094 (Epoxyphenol resin, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Dimethylformamide 85 parts by weight
Composition of heat sensitive layer (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC", produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) 24 parts by weight (b) Carbon black (Table 3) (d) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (e) Epoxy acrylate ("Denacol Acrylate" DA-314, produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 15 parts by weight (f) Diethylenetriamine 5 parts by weight (g) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

The "Lumirror" film was removed from the original printing plate, and the plate was pulse-exposed to a laser beam of 20 µm in diameter for 10 µs using a semiconductor laser (SLD-304XT, 1 W in output, 809 nm in wavelength, produced by Sony Corp.) mounted on an X-Y table. The laser output was changed as desired by an LD pulse modulation drive, and the laser power on the plate surface was measured.

In succession, the plate surface was rubbed by a cotton pad impregnated with a developer with the following composition, for development. (a) Water 80 parts by weight (b) Diethylene glycol mono-2-ethylhexyl ether 20 parts by weight

The image reproducibility of the printing plate was evaluated by a 50-fold magnifying lens, to decide the minimum laser power for forming dots, and from the result, the sensitivity of the printing plate was measured. The results are shown in Table 3.

From Table 3, it can be seen that if the grain size of carbon black or the oil absorption of carbon black does not conform to the specified ranges, the sensitivity declines.

Synthesizing examples 1 to 6

Fifty milliliters of concentrated sulfuric acid was put into a 200 ml Erlenmeyer flask, and 50 ml of fuming nitric acid was added gradually along a glass rod. After completion of addition, the mixture was cooled by water, to prepare a mixed acid. One gram of an absolute dry cellulose sample (fibrous, produced by Nakarai Tesque K.K.) was accurately weighed, and the acid was added little by little. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for a predetermined time.

After completion of stirring, the reaction product was filtered by a glass filter, and the residue was washed by icy water three times, finally washed by methanol, and dried by a 50°C dryer. The obtained nitrocellulose was accurately weighed.

(Compounds 1 to 6)

If the weight of the obtained nitrocellulose is x (g), the nitrogen content (%) can be calculated from the following formula:(Table 4) 31.1 x (1 - 1/x)

Examples 10 to 13

A 0.15 mm aluminum sheet (produced by Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd.) was coated with the following heat insulating composition using a bar coater, and heat-treated at 220°C for 2 minutes, to form a 5 g/m2 heat insulating layer. (a) Polyurethane resin (Sanprene LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 90 parts by weight (b) Block isocyanate (Takenate B830, produced by Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (c) Epoxy phenol urea resin (SJ9372, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 8 parts by weight (d) Tetraglycerol dimethacrylate 0.2 part by weight (e) Dimethylformamide 725 parts by weight

In succession, the heat insulating layer was coated with the following composition destined to form a heat sensitive layer using a bar coater, and dried in 140°C air for 1 minute, to form a 3 g/m2 thick heat sensitive layer. (a) Nitrocellulose (any of compounds 1 to 4, Table 4) 20 parts by weight (b) Copper phthalocyanine (produced by Nakarai Tesque K.K.) 2 parts by weight (c) Carbon black "RAVEN1255" (produced by Columbian Carbon Nippon K.K.) 23 parts by weight (d) Epoxy resin "Denacol" EX512 (produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 50 parts by weight (e) Urea resin "Beccamin" P-138 10 parts by weight (f) Polyester resin ("Vylon 300" produced by Toyobo Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (g) Methyl ethyl ketone 700 parts by weight

In succession, the heat sensitive layer was coated with a silicone rubber solution with the following composition, and dried at 120°C for 2 minutes, to form a 3 g/m2 thick silicone rubber layer. (a) Vinylpolydimethylsiloxane 100 parts by weight (b) Hydrogensiloxane 12 parts by weight (c) Platinum catalyst 0.2 part by weight (d) Hardening retarder 2 parts by weight (e) Allyltriethoxysilane 0.2 part by weight (f) "Isopar E" (Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1200 parts by weight

Comparative examples 6 and 7

Printing plates were produced as described in Example 10, except that the heat insulating layer, heat sensitive layer and ink repellent layer were formed using the following compositions. Composition of heat insulating layer (a) Kancoat 90T-25-3094 (epoxyphenol resin, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Dimethylformamide 85 parts by weight
Composition of heat sensitive layer (a) Nitrocellulose (either of compounds 5 and 6, Table 4) 20 parts by weight (b) Copper phthalocyanine (Nakarai Tesque K.K.) 2 parts by weight (c) Carbon black "RAVEN1255" (produced by Columbian Carbon Nippon K.K.) 23 parts by weight (d) Epoxy resin "Denacol" EX512 (produced by Nagase Kasei Kogyo K.K.) 50 parts by weight (e) Urea resin "Beccamin" P-138 10 parts by weight (f) Methyl ethyl ketone 700 parts by weight
Composition of ink repellent layer (a) Polydimethylsiloxane (about 35,000 in molecular weight, with hydroxyl groups at the ends) 100 parts by weight (b) Vinyltrioximesilane 5 parts by weight (c) Dibutyltin diacetate 0.2 part by weight (d) "Isopar G" (produced by Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1200 parts by weight

This original printing plate was pulse-exposed to a laser beam of 20 µm in diameter for 10 µm using a semiconductor laser (OPC-A001-mmm-FC, 0.75 W in output, 780 nm in wavelength, produced by Opto Power Corporation) mounted on an X-Y table.

The exposed plate was developed at room temperature (25 °C) at a humidity of 80% using TWL 1160 (waterless planographic printing plate developing machine produced by Toray Industries, Inc., 100 cm/min in processing speed). As the developer, water was used. As a dyeing solution, a solution with the following composition was used. (a) Ethyl carbitol 18 parts by weight (b) Water 79.9 parts by weight (c) Crystal Violet 0.1 part by weight (d) 2-ethylhexanoic acid 2 parts by weight

The image reproducibility of the printing plate was evaluated using a 50-fold magnifying lens, to decide the minimum laser power for forming dots, and from the result, the sensitivity of the printing plate was measured.

Furthermore, the printing plate was installed on an offset press, and printing was executed using "Dry-O-Color" black, cyan, red and yellow inks produced by Dainippon Ink & Chemicals, Inc. The number of printed sheets at which the plate surface was observed to be damaged was identified as printing durability. The result is shown in Table 4.

From Table 4, it can be seen that the printing durability of the printing plate declines extremely if the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose is 11.5% or more, or if the viscosity of nitrocellulose does not conform to the specified range.

Examples 14 to 19

A 0.25 mm thick degreased aluminum sheet was coated with a heat insulating solution with the following composition, and dried at 230°C for 1 minutes, to form a 3 g/m2 thick heat insulating layer. (a) Kancoat 90T-25-3094 (epoxyphenol resin, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Polyurethane ("Sanprene" LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 20 parts by weight (d) Dimethylformamide 85 parts by weight

The photosensitive layer was coated with the following composition destined to form a heat sensitive layer, and dried at 130°C for 1 minute, to form a 2 g/m2 thick heat sensitive layer. (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC", produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) (Table 5) (b) Carbon black (Table 5) (c) Polyester resin ("VYLON 300", produced by Toyobo Co., Ltd.) 30 parts by weight (d) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (e) Diethyltriamine 5 parts by weight (f) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

In succession, the heat sensitive layer was coated with a silicone rubber solution with the following composition, and dried at 120°C for 2 minutes, to form a 3 g/m2 thick silicone rubber layer. (a) Vinylpolydimethylsiloxane 100 parts by weight (b) Hydrogensiloxane 12 parts by weight (c) Platinum catalyst 0.2 part by weight (d) Hardening retarder 2 parts by weight (e) Silicone Primer "ME-151" (produced by Toshiba Silicone K.K.) 0.08 part by weight (f) "Isopar E" (produced by Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1200 parts by weight

Onto the laminate obtained as described above, an 8 µm thick polyester film "Lumirror" (produced by Toray Industries, Inc.) was laminated using a calender roller, to obtain a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate.

Comparative examples 8 and 9

Printing plates were produced as described in Example 14, except that the heat insulating layer and the heat sensitive layer were formed using the following compositions. Composition of heat insulating layer (a) Kancoat 90T-25-3094 (epoxyphenol resin, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Dimethylformamide 85 parts by weight
Composition of heat sensitive layer (a) Nitrocellulose (1/2 second in viscosity, 11.0% in nitrogen content, "Bergerac NC", produced by SNPE Japan K.K.) (Table 5) (b) Carbon black (Table 5) (c) Modified epoxy resin ("Epokey" 803, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 15 parts by weight (d) Diethylenetriamine 5 parts by weight (e) Methyl isobutyl ketone 600 parts by weight

Subsequently, the "Lumirror" film was removed from the original printing plate, and the plate was pulse-exposed to a laser beam of 20 µm in diameter for 10 µs using a semiconductor laser (SLD-304XT, 1 W in output, 809 nm in wavelength, produced by Sony Corp.) mounted on an X-Y table. The laser output was changed as desired by an LD pulse modulation drive, and the laser power on the plate surface was measured, to calculate the sensitivity.

In succession, the plate surface was rubbed by a cotton pad impregnated with a developer with the following composition, for development. (a) Water 80 parts by weight (b) Diethylene glycol mono-2-ethylhexyl ether 20 parts by weight

The image reproducibility of the printing plate was evaluated by a 50-fold magnifying lens, to decide the minimum laser power for forming dots, and from the result, the sensitivity of the printing plate was measured. The results are shown in Table 5.

From Table 5, it can be seen that if the amounts of carbon black and nitrocellulose do not conform to the specified ranges, the sensitivity declines.

Example 20

A 0.15 mm thick degreased aluminum sheet was coated with a heat insulating solution with the following composition using a bar coater, and dried at 200°C for 2 minutes, to form a 4 g/m2 thick heat insulating layer. (a) Polyurethane resin (Sanprene LQ-T1331, produced by Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 90 parts by weight (b) Block isocyanate (Takenate B830, produced by Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd.) 35 parts by weight (c) Epoxy&peseta;phenol&peseta;urea resin (SJ9372, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 8 parts by weight (d) Dimethylformamide 725 parts by weight

In succession, the heat insulating layer was coated with the following composition destined to form a heat sensitive layer using a bar coater, and dried at 150°C for 1 minute, to form a 1 g/m2 thick heat sensitive layer. (a) Carbon black 27 parts by weight (b) Nitrocellulose 24 parts by weight (c) Water soluble epoxy resin (Denacol EX145, produced by Nagase Kasei K.K.) 15 parts by weight (d) Amino resin (Yuban 2061, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 14 parts by weight (e) Polyester resin ("Vylon 300", produced by Toyobo Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (f) Dimethylformamide 80 parts by weight (g) Methyl isobutyl ketone 720 parts by weight

In succession, the heat sensitive layer was coated with the following composition destined to form a silicone rubber layer, and dried at 170°C for 2 minutes, to form a 2 g/m2 thick silicone rubber layer. (a) Vinyl group-containing polysiloxane 90 parts by weight (b) Hydrogenpolysiloxane 8 parts by weight (c) Hardening retarder 2 parts by weight (d) Catalyst 0.2 part by weight (e) Silicone Primer "DY39-067" (produced by Toray Dow Corning Silicone K.K.) 0.8 part by weight (f) "Isopar E" (produced by Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1400 parts by weight

Onto the laminate obtained as described above, an 8 µm thick polyester film "Lumirror" (produced by Toray Industries, Inc.) was laminated using a calender roller, to obtain a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate.

Subsequently the "Lumirror" film was removed from the original printing plate, and the plate was pulse-exposed to a laser beam of 20 µm in diameter for 10 µs using a semiconductor laser (OPC-A001-mmm-FC, 0.75 W in output, 780 nm in wavelength, produced by Opto Power Corporation) mounted on an X-Y table.

In succession, the exposed plate was rubbed on the surface by a cotton pad impregnated with water 30 times, for development. The optical densities of the non-exposed area (ink repellent area) and the exposed area (inking area) were measured using a Macbeth optical densitometer, and the peeling degree of the heat sensitive layer on the exposed area was examined. The result is shown in Table 7.

Comparative example 10

A printing plate was produced as described in Example 20, except that the heat insulating layer, heat sensitive layer and ink repellent layer were formed by the following compositions. Composition of heat insulating layer (a) Kancoat 90T-25-3094 (epoxyphenol resin, produced by Kansai Paint Co., Ltd.) 15 parts by weight (b) Victoria Pure Blue BOH naphthalenesulfonic acid 0.1 part by weight (c) Dimethylformamide 85 parts by weight
Composition of heat sensitive layer (a) Carbon black 27 parts by weight (b) Nitrocellulose 24 parts by weight (c) Epoxy resin (Epikote 828, Yuka Shell Epoxy K.K.) 15 parts by weight (d) Amino resin (Yuban 2061, produced by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc.) 14 parts by weight (e) Dimethylformamide 80 parts by weight (f) Methyl isobutyl ketone 720 parts by weight
Composition of ink repellent layer (a) Polydimethylsiloxane (about 35,000 in molecular weight, with hydroxyl groups a the ends) 100 parts by weight (b) Vinyltrioximesilane 4 parts by weight (c) Dibutyltin diacetate 0.3 part by weight (d) "Isopar G" (produced by Exxon Kagaku K.K.) 1200 parts by weight

Examples 21 to 24

Plates were produced as described in Example 20, except that the water soluble epoxy resin in the heat sensitive layer was substituted by any one of the hydrophilic compounds shown in Table 6, and evaluated. The results are shown in Table 7.

All the plates were good in image reproducibility. From Table 7, it can be seen that the plates containing any water soluble resin had their heat sensitive layers almost perfectly peeled in the inking areas, being improved in plate inspectability, but that the plates not containing any water soluble resin had their heat sensitive layers not removed perfectly, being poor in plate inspectability.

Examples 25 to 27, and comparative examples 11 and 12

Waterless planographic printing plates were produced as described in Example 20, except that the heat insulating solution, heat sensitive layer solution and silicone rubber solution used in Example 20 were applied by any of the coating methods shown in Table 8.

From Table 8, it can be seen that a dip coater and air knife coater did not allow well-controlled uniformly thick coating, resulting in poor adhesion between the respective layers, but that a slit die coater, gravure coater and roller coater allowed uniform coating.

INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY

The directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate of the present invention can be suitably used also for large printing presses and web offset printing presses requiring high printing durability, since it can provide a waterless planographic printing plate high in sensitivity and developability and excellent in printing durability.


Anspruch[de]
  1. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte für eine Trocken-Flachdruckplatte, bei der eine wärmeisolierende Schicht, eine wärmeempfindliche Schicht und eine druckfarbenabweisende Schicht in dieser Reihenfolge auf einem Substrat ausgebildet sind, wobei die wärmeempfindliche Schicht eine vernetzte Struktur aufweist und aus einem schwache Wärme umwandelnden Material und einem Harzbindemittel besteht, das eine Glastemperatur Tg von 20 °C oder darunter aufweist, und worin die wärmeempfindliche Schicht oder ein Laminat aus der wärmeempfindlichen Schicht und der wärmeisolierenden Schicht folgende physikalische Eigenschaften aufweist: einen anfänglichen Elastizitätsmodul von 5 bis 100 kp/mm2 und Zugeigenschaften von 0,05 bis 5 kp/mm2 bei 5 % Belastung, gemessen gemäß der JIS K6301.
  2. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach Anspruch 1, worin das schwache Wärme umwandelnde Material Ofenruß mit einer mittleren Korngröße der Primärkörner von 15 bis 29 nm und einer Ölabsorption von 50 bis 100 ml/100 g ist.
  3. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach Anspruch 1 oder 2, die weiters aus einem selbst-oxidierenden Material besteht.
  4. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach Anspruch 3, worin das selbstoxidierende Material Nitrocellulose mit einer Viskosität von 1/16 bis 3 s gemäß ASTM D301-72 und einem Stickstoffgehalt von 11,5 % oder weniger ist.
  5. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach Anspruch 3, worin die selbstoxidierende Schicht aus Ruß, Nitrocellulose und Harz besteht und das Gewichtsverhältnis Ruß : Nitrocellulose = 1,1 oder mehr: 1 ist.
  6. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach Anspruch 5, worin die Summe aus dem Gewicht von Ruß und jenem von Nitrocellulose in der wärmeempfindlichen Schicht 30 bis 90 Gew.-%, bezogen auf das Gewicht der gesamten Zusammensetzung der wärmeempfindlichen Schicht, beträgt und die Dicke der wärmeempfindlichen Schicht 0,2 bis 4 g/m2 beträgt.
  7. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 6, worin die druckfarbenabweisende Schicht aus einem Silikonkautschuk vom Additionstyp besteht und einen Silan-Haftvermittler enthält.
  8. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach Anspruch 7, worin der Silan-Haftvermittler ein ungesättigte Gruppen enthaltender Silan-Haftvermittler ist.
  9. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 8, worin die wärmeempfindliche Schicht 10 bis 40 Gew.-% von zumindest einem oder mehreren Materialien enthält, die aus Salzen, Monomeren, Oligomeren und Harzen ausgewählt sind und in Wasser löslich oder damit quellbar sind.
  10. Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 9, worin die optische Dichte der wärmeempfindlichen Schicht 0,6 bis 2,3 beträgt.
  11. Verfahren zur Herstellung einer Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte für eine Trocken-Flachdruckplatte nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 10, wobei das Verfahren die Verwendung eines Schmelzbeschichters, eines Tiefdruckbeschichters oder eines Walzenbeschichters zum Beschichten eines Substrats mit einer wärmeisolierenden Schicht, einer wärmeempfindlichen Schicht und einer Druckfarbe-abweisenden Schicht in dieser Reihenfolge umfasst.
  12. Trocken-Flachdruckplatte, hergestellt durch selektive Bilderzeugung auf der Direktbilderzeugungs-Rohplatte für eine Trocken-Flachdruck-Druckplatte nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 10 und Entwicklung derselben.
Anspruch[en]
  1. A directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate, in which a heat insulating layer, heat sensitive layer and ink repellent layer are formed in that order on a substrate, the heat sensitive layer having a cross linked structure and being composed of a light-heat converting material and a binder resin having a glass transition point Tg of 20°C or lower, and wherein the heat sensitive layer or a laminate of the heat sensitive layer and heat insulating layer has physical properties of 5 to 100 kgf/mm2 in initial elastic modulus and 0.05 to 5 kgf/mm2 in 5% stress as tensile properties, when measured according to JIS K6301.
  2. A directly imageable raw plate according to claim 1, wherein the light-heat converting material is furnace type carbon black of 15 to 29 nm in the average grain size of primary grains and 50 to 100 ml/100 g in oil absorption.
  3. A directly imageable raw plate according to claim 1 or 2, in which the heat sensitive layer is further composed of a self oxidizing material.
  4. A directly imageable raw plate according to claim 3, wherein the self oxidizing material is nitrocellulose of 1/16 to 3 seconds in the viscosity according to ASTM D301-72 and 11.5% or less in nitrogen content.
  5. A directly imageable raw plate according to claim 3, wherein the heat sensitive layer is composed of carbon black, nitrocellulose and resin, and the ratio by weight of carbon black and nitrocellulose is carbon black : nitrocellulose = 1.1 or more : 1.
  6. A directly imageable raw plate according to claim 5, wherein the sum of weights of carbon black and nitrocellulose in the heat sensitive layer is 30 to 90 wt% based on the weight of the entire composition of the heat sensitive layer, and the thickness of the heat sensitive layer is 0.2 to 3 g/m2.
  7. A directly imageable raw plate according to any one of claims 1 to 6, in which said ink repellent layer is composed of an addition type silicone rubber and contains a silane coupling agent.
  8. A directly imageable raw plate according to claim 7, wherein the silane coupling agent is an unsaturated group-containing silane coupling agent.
  9. A directly imageable raw plate according to any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein the heat sensitive layer contains 10 to 40 wt% of at least one or more materials selected from salts, monomers, oligomers and resins capable of being dissolved in or swollen by water.
  10. A directly imageable raw plate according to any one of claims 1 to 9, wherein the optical density of the heat sensitive layer is 0.6 to 2.3.
  11. A method for producing a directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 10, the method comprising the use of a die coater, gravure coater or roll coater for coating a substrate with a heat insulating layer, heat sensitive layer and ink repellent layer in this order.
  12. A waterless planographic printing plate, prepared by selectively imaging on the directly imageable raw plate for a waterless planographic printing plate as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 10, and developing it.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Plaque brute directement imageable pour une plaque d'impression planographique sèche dans laquelle une couche thermo-isolante, une couche thermosensible et une couche repoussant l'encre sont formées dans cet ordre sur un substrat, la couche thermosensible ayant une structure réticulée et se composant d'un matériau de conversion lumière-chaleur et d'une résine liant ayant un point de transition vitreux Tg de 20°C ou moins et où la couche thermosensible ou un stratifié de la couche thermosensible et de la couche thermo-isolante a des propriétés physiques de 5 à 100 kgf/mm2 de module élastique initial et de 0,05 à 5 kgf/mm2 d'effort à 5% en tant que propriétés de traction, en mesurant selon JIS K6301.
  2. Plaque brute directement imageable selon la revendication 1, où le matériau de conversion lumière-chaleur est du noir de carbone du type au four de 15 à 29 nm de dimension moyenne du grain des grains primaires et de 50 à 100 ml/100 g d'absorption d'huile.
  3. Plaque brute directement imageable selon la revendication 1 ou 2, qui se compose de plus d'un matériau s'auto-oxydant.
  4. Plaque brute directement imageable selon la revendication 3, où le matériau s'auto-oxydant est de la nitrocellulose de 1/16 à 3 secondes de viscosité selon ASTM D301-72 et 11,5% ou moins de teneur en azote.
  5. Plaque brute directement imageable selon la revendication 3, où la couche thermosensible se compose de noir de carbone, de nitrocellulose et de résine, et le rapport en poids du noir de carbone et de la nitrocellulose est noir de carbone: nitrocellulose=1,1 ou plus : 1.
  6. Plaque brute directement imageable selon la revendication 5, où la somme des poids du noir de carbone et de la nitrocellulose dans la couche thermosensible est de 30 à 90% en poids en se basant sur le poids de toute la composition de la couche thermosensible et l'épaisseur de la couche thermosensible est de 0,2 à 3 g/m2.
  7. Plaque brute directement imageable selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 6, où ladite couche repoussant l'encre se compose d'un caoutchouc de silicone du type addition et contient un agent de couplage de silane.
  8. Plaque brute directement imageable selon la revendication 7, où l'agent de couplage de silane est un agent de couplage de silane contenant un groupe insaturé.
  9. Plaque brute directement imageable selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 8 où la couche thermosensible contient 10 à 40% en poids d'au moins un ou plusieurs matériaux sélectionnés parmi des sels, des monomères, des oligomères et des résines capables d'être dissous dans ou gonflés par l'eau.
  10. Plaque brute directement imageable selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 9, où la densité optique de la couche thermosensible est de 0,6 à 2,3.
  11. Méthode de production d'une plaque brute directement imageable pour une plaque d'impression planographique sèche selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 10, la méthode comprenant l'utilisation d'un moyen d'enduction à matrice, d'un moyen d'enduction pour gravure ou d'un moyen d'enduction à rouleau pour enduire un substrat d'une couche thermo-isolante, d'une couche thermosensible et d'une couche repoussant l'encre dans cet ordre.
  12. Plaque d'impression planographique sèche préparée en imageant sélectivement sur la plaque brute directement imageable pour une plaque d'impression planographique sèche selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 10, et en la développant.






IPC
A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
B Arbeitsverfahren; Transportieren
C Chemie; Hüttenwesen
D Textilien; Papier
E Bauwesen; Erdbohren; Bergbau
F Maschinenbau; Beleuchtung; Heizung; Waffen; Sprengen
G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

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