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Dokumentenidentifikation EP1260144 09.01.2003
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 1260144
Titel VERFAHREN ZUR HERSTELLUNG EINES SOJAPROTEINHYDROLYSATES
Anmelder Fuji Oil Co., Ltd., Osaka, JP
Erfinder NAKAMORI, Toshihiro, Izumisano-shi, Osaka 598-0061, JP;
AKASAKA, Yoshimi, Izumisano-shi, Osaka 598-0061, JP;
MAEDA, Hirokazu, Izumisano-shi, Osaka 598-0061, JP
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, CH, CY, DE, DK, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, IE, IT, LI, LU, MC, NL, PT, SE
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 27.04.2000
EP-Aktenzeichen 009210659
WO-Anmeldetag 27.04.2000
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/JP00/02780
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0001064047
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 07.09.2001
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 27.11.2002
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 09.01.2003
IPC-Hauptklasse A23J 3/16
IPC-Nebenklasse A23J 3/34   

Beschreibung[en]
Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a process for producing a soybean protein hydrolysate. More specifically, it relates to a process for producing a soybean protein hydrolyzed with an enzyme in high yield with minimal formation of dregs upon dissolution.

Background Art

Products obtained by hydrolyzing proteins with a proteolytic enzyme have better absorbability upon digestion than those of proteins without proteolysis, and are utilized in various fields such as health food. In particular, their use is postulated in sports drinks and drinks for nutrition.

Up to now, JP 61-254153 A, JP 1-269499 A, JP 2-23885 A, 4-190797 A, JP 8-322471 A, JP 10-271958 A, etc., disclose processes for producing enzymatic decomposition products obtained by hydrolyzing animal and vegetable proteins with enzymes. In general, after hydrolysis of proteins with an enzyme, heat treatment is carried out in these known processes so as to inactivate the enzyme, sterilizing the products, and so on. In particular, anaerobic thermophilic bacteria often cause problems in these kinds of products and, normally, thorough heat sterilization is required.

EP-A-408,063 discloses a process for producing hydrolyzed vegetable proteins such as soy protein. In this process, soy protein is enzymatically hydrolyzed and the hydrolysate is heated under acidic conditions to deamidate the hydrolysate, followed by neutralising the deamidate hydrolysate.

US-A-5,716,801, discloses a method for producing a vegetable protein such as soy protein by enzymatic hydrolysis. In this process, the enzyme is inactivated by heating just after hydrolysis and the sterilisation is carried out by ultrafiltration.

EP-A-797,928 discloses a method for producing a soy protein hydrolysate with a low content glycinin by allowing a proteolytic enzyme to act on soy protein at a pH of 1.0 to 2.8 to selectively decompose glycinin in the soybean protein.

EP-A-797,927 discloses a method for producing a soy protein hydrolysate with a low content of &bgr;-conglycinin by allowing a proteolytic enzyme to act on soybean protein at a temperature of higher than 50°C to less than 90°C to selectively decompose &bgr;-conglycinin in the soybean protein.

EP-A-963,704 relates to the treatment of proteinaceous material with a transglutaminase and an oxido-reductase.

US-A-3,830,942 discloses a method for producing protein products which comprises the steps of forming an aqueous slurry containing defatted oleaginous seed materials, adjusting the pH of the aqueous slurry to approximately the isoelectric point of the oleaginous seed materials, heating said aqueous slurry to elevated temperatures, adding a predetermined amount of enzyme to the aqueous slurry, agitating the mixture during digestion of the protein material and thereafter separating the undigested protein from the digested protein.

In addition, although a water-soluble fraction and a water-insoluble fraction are separated after hydrolysis, conventional drinks containing protein hydrolysates are liable to form a small amount of a precipitate (dregs) during storage and this is a problem. In general, improvement of quality causes a decrease in yield, whereas increase in yield is liable to form more dregs during storage. This is also a problem.

Objects of the Invention

One object of the present invention is to provide a process for producing a soybean protein hydrolyzed with an enzyme in a high yield with minimal formation of dregs upon dissolution.

Summary of the Invention

The present inventors have studied intensively to solve the above problems. As a result, it has been found that the above problems can be solved by a two-step heat treatment, wherein, after hydrolysis of a protein with an enzyme, the hydrolyzation mixture is subjected to a step of heating lightly, followed by cooling to separate insolubles before subjecting the mixture to heat sterilization. Thus, the present invention has been completed.

That is, the present invention is a process for producing a soybean protein hydrolysate which comprises hydrolyzing a soybean protein solution with a proteolytic enzyme to a degree of hydrolysis of 20% to 98% in terms of a soybean protein decomposition rate expressed by a solubilization degree of a protein component in 15% trichloroacetic acid, heating (a) the hydrolyzation mixture at a temperature of 75°C or higher which does not inactivate the enzyme for 10(5.25-0.05 ×T) minutes (wherein T is heating temperature (°C)) or shorter, cooling the hydrolyzation mixture until the temperature drops to 30°C or lower separating and removing insolubles from the mixture to obtain a supernatant, and heat-sterilizing (b) the supernatant for longer than 10 (5.25-0.05 ×T) minutes (wherein T is heating temperature (°C)) to such a degree that the enzyme remaining is substantially inactivated and a remaining viable count is 10 or less.

Preferably, insolubles are separated and removed at a pH of the soybean protein solution of 4.0 to 6.2, or the soybean protein solution contains an alkaline earth metal compound or a protein flocculating agent.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiments

As a raw material for preparing the soybean protein solution of the present invention, which is derived from soybeans and is available inexpensively, there can be used soybean milk, concentrated soybean protein, isolated soybean protein, defatted-soybeans and, soybean whey protein. Among these, soybean milk or isolated soybean protein is preferred. When concentrated soybean protein or defatted-soybeans are used, separation of "okara (insoluble residue)" after enzymatic decomposition tends to be difficult. Also, it takes much time to collect whey protein, and whey protein has an inferior flavor. As an alkali to be used for preparing the soybean protein solution, or adjusting the pH of the hydrolyzation mixture, sodium hydroxide can be used. Potassium hydroxide can also be used with a view to nutrition. As an acid, preferably, an organic acid such as citric acid is used with a view to flavor.

The concentration of the soybean protein solution to be subjected to the enzymatic treatment is 1 to 30% by weight, preferably 5 to 15% by weight, more preferably 8 to 12% by weight. Even if the concentration is low, it will not be an obstacle to the process itself. However, productivity is reduced, which causes an increase in the production cost of a soybean protein hydrolysate. When the concentration of the soybean protein solution is too high, a large amount of an enzyme is required for decomposing the protein sufficiently. This may be caused by polymerization of protein hydrolysates once formed by hydrolysis with one another, and is undesirable.

As the proteolytic enzyme to be used in the present invention (protease), an exoprotease or endoprotease can be used alone or in combination. The enzyme may be derived from animals, vegetables or microorganisms. Specifically, serine proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, etc. derived from animals; subtilisin, carboxypeptidase, etc. derived from microorganisms; etc.), thiol proteases (papain ficin, bromelain, etc. derived from vegetables) and carboxy proteases (pepsin derived from animals) can be used. Further, specific examples include Protin FN (trade name of protease manufactured by Daiwakasei K.K.) derived from Aspergillus oryzae, Actinase (trade name of protease manufactured by Kaken Seiyaku K.K.) derived from Streptomyces griseus, Alkalase (trade name of protease manufactured by Novo) derived from Bacillus licheniformis, Protein A (trade name of protease manufactured by Daiwakasei K.K.) derived from Bacillus subtilis, and the like. In addition, examples of enzyme preparations containing endoproteases include Protease S manufactured by Amano Seiyaku K.K. and Protin AC-10 manufactured by Daiwakasei K.K. Examples of proteolytic enzymes containing exo- and endoproteases include Protease M manufactured by Amano Seiyaku K.K.

Conditions for hydrolysis of the present invention vary to some extent according to the particular kind of proteolytic enzyme to be used. However, in general, it is preferred to use the enzyme in an amount sufficient for hydrolyzing soybean protein in a pH range at a temperature effective for the enzyme activity. When the pH is 5 to 10, preferably 6 to 9, formation of a salt by neutralization can be reduced and this is desired with a view to using the hydrolysate for a salt-restriction diet (e.g., alimental infusion, etc.).

The degree of hydrolysis is 20 to 98%, more preferably 50 to 90% in terms of the soybean protein decomposition rate expressed by the degree of solubilization of the protein component in 15% trichloroacetic acid. Although the time for action of the proteolytic enzyme varies depending upon the activity of the particular proteolytic enzyme to be used and its amount, normally, it may be 5 minutes to 24 hours, preferably about 30 minutes to 9 hours. When the enzymatic decomposition time is too long, putrefaction is liable to take place.

The hydrolyzed soybean protein solution is subjected to heating (a) and cooling prior to the step of separating and removing insolubles therefrom. This heating (a) is effected lightly in comparison with that for heat sterilization. When this heating is effected excessively so that the heating time is in excess of 10(5.25-0.05 × T) minutes, a material causing dregs upon dissolution of the decomposed product is formed, presumably due to formation of a fraction eluted from a precipitated fraction of the soybean protein hydrolysate formed by hydrolysis. This is undesirable. On the contrary, when this heating is not effected, flocculation capability of insolubles is poor, which results in difficulty in separation between a supernatant and insolubles with a practical continuous separation means. Flocculation capability can be readily judged by, for example, collecting a 10 cc sample of an enzyme hydrolyzation mixture at 25°C, which has resulted from enzymatic decomposition of a soybean protein solution, followed by heat treatment, in a graduated centrifuge tube, centrifuging at 1,500 G for 20 minutes to precipitate a sludge (precipitate) and then comparing the volume of the sludge to that of a sample obtained in the same manner except that the heat treatment is not effected. Specifically, it is preferred to effect this heating to such a degree that the volume of the former is 2/3 or less of the latter. The required heating time can be readily determined within the range of 75 to 160°C, preferably 80 to 140°C. A shorter heating time can be employed if the heating temperature is higher. Normally, a heating time (minutes) of 10(3.5-0.05 × T) or longer is sufficient. For example, it is sufficient to raise the temperature to about 110°C, followed by maintaining this temperature for about 0.01 minute and then cooling.

It is suitable to effect the cooling of the next step so that the temperature is reduced to

30°C or less, preferably 15°C or less. When this cooling is omitted, it makes the separation of insolubles difficult. Then in the case of centrifugation, a high centrifugal force or longer holding time is required for separation of insolubles. Specifically, when heating and cooling were not carried out prior to separation, a longer holding time such as 20 minutes at 1,500 g was required for separation of insolubles by centrifugation. However, according to the present invention, insolubles can be separated by centrifugation within a shorter holding time such as for several seconds to 5 minutes at 1,500 g. Therefore, according to the present invention, continuous centrifugation can be employed, whereas continuous centrifugation is hardly employed in a conventional process. In addition, as to the degree of insolubilization, a larger amount of dregs tend to form as the difference between the heating temperature and that of the cooling medium becomes larger. Then, as to cooling conditions, it is preferred that the difference between the heating temperature and that of a cooling medium is larger.

Further, although cooling can be carried out by allowing to stand (natural cooling), artificial cooling with a cooling medium is preferred because cooling can be carried out quickly to insolubilize components of the dregs quickly, thereby facilitating prevention of formation of dregs upon dissolution of the product.

Separation of insolubles can be carried out by a filtration means such as a filter press, membrane or filter. However, normally, centrifugation is employed and, in particular, a continuous centrifugal separator, a liquid cyclone, etc. can be used.

Normally, the pH of the hydrolyzation mixture is within the range of 3 to 8. In order to accelerate or improve the separation/flocculation capability of the above insolubles, it is suitable that the pH is preferably 4 to 6.2, more preferably 4.5 to 5.5 because insolubles containing undecomposed materials tend to flocculate at about the isoelectric point of soybean protein. Alternatively, separation/flocculation capability can also be accelerated or improved by addition of an alkaline earth metal compound such as a salt, for example, a chloride or sulfate, or a hydroxide of calcium, magnesium, etc. or a flocculating agent such as sodium polyacrylate, aliginic acid, chitin, chitosan, etc. to the hydrolyzation mixture.

After separation and removal of insolubles, heat sterilization (b) is carried out. This treatment can be carried out according to a known method. However, when the above heating (a) is effective for heat sterilization and inactivation of the enzyme though it is weak, the conditions of this heating can be milder taking into consideration the effect of the heating (a). Suitably, this heating is carried out to such a degree that the enzyme remaining in the soybean protein hydrolysate is substantially inactivated and the remaining viable count is 10 or less. Normally, it is preferred to carry out heating in excess of the above-described heating time, i.e., for longer than 10(5.25-0.05 × T) minutes (wherein T is heating temperature (°C)).

The pH of the hydrolyzation mixture to be subjected to this heat sterilization (b) is preferably determined by the particular use of the end product and, normally, it is within the range pH 3 to 8. When the hydrolysate of the present invention is used for neutral drinks, preferably, the end product is within pH 6 to 7. When the hydrolysate is used for acidic drinks, pH 3.5 to 4.5 is suitable. The degree of sterilization varies to some extent according to this pH value. In the case of weakly acidic to neutral, sterilization of thermophilic anearobes such as Clostridium, etc. is required and, preferably, the heating is carried out in excess of, i.e., for longer than 10(6.25-0.95 × 7) minutes. On the other hand, when the final pH is about 4.5 or less, a heating time of 10(6.25-0.05 × T) minutes or shorter is sufficient because growth of almost all pathogenic bacteria, putrefactive bacteria and sporangia hardly takes place.

The product resulting from the heat sterilization (b) can be stored as it is, or after concentration, by sealing in a container. Alternatively, the product can be dried and pulverized or atomized for storage.

Examples

The embodiments of the present invention are illustrated by the following Examples.

Example 1

An aqueous 0.9% solution (pH 7.0) of isolated soybean protein ("New Fuji Pro-R" manufactured by Fuji Oil, Co., Ltd.) (30 kg) was prepared and subjected to an enzymatic reaction with a proteolytic enzyme ("Protease S" manufactured by Amano Seiyaku K.K.) (1.2 kg) to hydrolyze the protein at 60°C for 5 hours (15% TCA solubilisation degree: 85%). Then the hydrolyzation mixture was adjusted to pH 5.5 by addition of citric acid. Steam at 8 kg/cm2 was blown into the mixture to raise its temperature to 95°C and the mixture was held at this temperature for 1 minute (heating (a)). The mixture was cooled at 12°C with a heat exchanger plate through which cooling water was passed, followed by centrifugation with a high-speed continuous centrifugal separator (SB-7 manufactured by WESTFALLIA SEPARATOR) by adjusting the feed rate to 100 L/hour to separate and remove the precipitate fraction formed. The precipitate fraction was sufficiently firm to retain it for 20 minutes until it was discharged. The resultant supernatant (yield of solids: 72.4%) was adjusted to pH 6.5 and sterilized at 150°C for 1 minute (heat-sterilization (b)). Immediately after sterilization, the supernatant was spray-dried to obtain a dry powder. The resultant dried powder was dissolved in water at a concentration of 5%. When this solution was stored at 5°C for 24 hours, dregs were not observed at all.

The above hydrolyzation mixture (10 cc) was collected in a graded centrifuge tube before heating (a) and its temperature adjusted to 25°C and was centrifuged at 1,500 G for 20 minutes. The volume of the sludge was 32% of that of the hydrolyzation mixture. By heating (a), the volume of the sludge was condensed to 10% of that of the hydrolyzation mixture.

Comparative Example 1 (The first heating step was omitted).

In the same manner as described in Example 1, a dried powder was obtained except that the soybean protein adjusted to pH 5.5 was not subjected to the heat treatment, but was directly cooled to 12°C with a heat exchanger plate, followed by centrifugation. In this case, the precipitate fraction formed in the centrifugal separate was insufficiently firm. Then, the fraction could be retained only for 5 minutes until it was discharged. The resultant dried powder was dissolved in water at a concentration of 5% and the solution was stored at 5°C for 24 hours. Although dregs were not formed at all, the yield of solids of the supernatant was only 53.2%.

Comparative Examples 2 and 3 (Heat sterilization was effected at the first heating step).

In the same manner as described in Example 1, a dried powder was obtained except that the hydrolyzation mixture was raised to 95°C and maintained at that temperature for 20 minutes, or raised to 80°C and maintained at that temperature for 60 minutes instead of raising to 95°C and maintaining at that temperature for 1 minute, and heat sterilization was omitted. The volume of sludge determined by adjusting the temperature to 25°C and centrifuging at 1,500 G for 20 minutes was almost the same as that of Example 1. However, when the resultant dried powder was dissolved in water at a concentration of 5% and the solution was stored at 5°C for 24 hours, dregs were clearly recognized with the naked eye in both cases.

Example 2 and Comparative Example 4 (Cooling was slow cooling or omitted).

In the same manner as described in Example 1, a dried powder was obtained except that the hydrolyzation mixture was allowed to cool for 4 hours to room temperature and then centrifuged (Example 2), or was centrifuged directly without cooling (Comparative Example 4) instead of subjecting to heat treatment at 95°C for 1 minute, cooling to 12°C and then centrifugation.

The dried powder was dissolved in water at a concentration of 5% and stored at 5°C for 24 hours. As a result, there was slight formation of dregs in Example 1, whereas dregs were clearly formed in Comparative Example 4.

Example 3 and Comparative Examples 5 and 6

In the same manner as described in Example 1, a dried powder was prepared except that the hydrolyzation mixture was adjusted to pH 4.5 by addition of citric acid, the heating (a) was carried out by holding at 100°C for 6 seconds, the mixture was cooled to 15°C, the centrifugation was carried out in a continuous centrifugal separate (MD-10 manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd.) by adjusting the feed rate to 30 L/hour, and the heat sterilization (b) was carried out at 125°C for 10 seconds (Example 3). When the dried powder was dissolved in water at a concentration of 5% and stored at 5°C for 24 hours, dregs were not formed at all.

The volume of sludge determined before heating (a) by raising the temperature to 25°C and centrifuging at 1,500 G for 20 minutes was 30% based on the volume of the hydrolyzation mixture, whereas the volume of sludge determined after heating (b) was 10% based on the volume of the hydrolyzation mixture. The yield of the supernatant by continuous centrifugation was 65%.

The soybean protein was treated in the same manner as described in Example 3 except that the heating (a) was omitted (Comparative Example 5). However, separation with the continuous centrifugal separator was bad. In addition, in the same manner as described in Example 3, a dried powder was produced except that the heating (a) was carried out by holding at 104°C for 5 minutes (Comparative Example 6). When the dried powder was dissolved in water at a concentration of 5% and stored at 5°C for 24 hours, dregs were clearly formed.

Example 4 and Comparative Example 7

An aqueous 9% soybean protein solution (pH 7.0) was prepared using the same isolated soybean protein as that in Example 1 (30 kg) and subjected to an enzymatic reaction with a proteolytic enzyme ("Protease M" manufactured by Amano Seiyaku K.K.) (E/S ratio = 2%) in a continuous enzymatic reaction vessel for 2 hours. After addition of CaSO4 in an amount of 0.5% by weight based on the weight of the substrate, steam was blown into the hydrolyzation mixture so that the temperature was raised to 130°C and heating (a) was stopped. The mixture was cooled to 15°C with a heat exchanger plate through which cooling water was passed, followed by treatment with a continuous separator, a liquid cyclone (NHS-10 manufactured by Nippon Kagaku Kikai Seizo) adjusting the feed rate to 400 L/hour to separate and remove insoluble components. The resultant supernatant was adjusted to pH 6.5 and sterilized at 150°C for 1 minute. Immediately after sterilization, the supernatant was spray-dried to obtain a dried powder. The resultant dried powder was dissolved in water at a concentration of 5%. When this solution was stored at 5°C for 24 hours, dregs were not formed at all.

As Comparative Example 7, the soybean protein was treated in the same manner as in Example 4 except that heating to 130°C by blowing steam into the hydrolyzation mixture was omitted and the mixture was directly cooled to 15°C. However, the insoluble components could not be separated by using the liquid cyclone.

Effect of the Invention

According to the present invention, a precipitate formed after enzymatic decomposition of soybean protein is readily separated, thereby improving a yield. Also, when the resultant enzymatic decomposition product is used for drinks, formation of dregs can be minimized.


Anspruch[de]
Verfahren zur Herstellung eines Sojaproteinhydrolysats, welches die Hydrolyse einer Sojaproteinlösung mit einem proteolytischen Enzym bis zu einem Grad der Hydrolyse von 20 bis 98 % im Sinne einer Sojaproteinabbaurate, ausgedrückt durch einen Solubilisierungsgrad eines Proteinbestandteils in 15 % Trichloressigsäure, Erhitzung (a) der Hydrolysemischung bei einer Temperatur von 75°C oder höher, die das Enzym nicht inaktiviert, für 10(5,25-0,05 × T) Minuten, wobei T die Erhitzungstemperatur (°C) ist, oder kürzer, Abkühlung der Hydrolysemischung bis die Temperatur auf 30°C oder weniger fällt, Trennung und Entfernung der unlöslichen Stoffe aus der Mischung, um einen Überstand zu erhalten, und Hitzesterilisierung (b) des Überstandes für länger als 10(5,25-0,05 × T) Minuten, wobei T die Erhitzungstemperatur (°C) ist, in solch einem Ausmass, dass das verbleibende Enzym im wesentlichen inaktiviert ist und die verbleibende Lebendkeimzahl 10 oder weniger beträgt, umfasst. Verfahren gemäss Anspruch 1, wobei die unlöslichen Stoffe bei einem pH der Sojaproteinlösung von 4,0 bis 6,2 getrennt und entfernt werden oder die Sojaproteinlösung eine Erdalkalimetallverbindung oder ein Proteinflockungsmittel enthält. Verfahren gemäss Anspruch 1, wobei die Sojaproteinlösung mit einem proteolytischen Enzym bis zu einem Grad der Hydrolyse von 50 bis 90 % im Sinne einer Sojaproteinabbaurate, ausgedrückt durch einen Solubilisierungsgrad eines Proteinbestandteils in 15 % Trichloressigsäure, hydrolysiert wird. Verfahren gemäss Anspruch 1, wobei die Trennung und Entfernung der löslichen Stoffe in Schritt (a) durch Zentrifugation durchgeführt wird.
Anspruch[en]
A process for producing a soybean protein hydrolysate which comprises hydrolyzing a soybean protein solution with a proteolytic enzyme to a degree of hydrolysis of 20 to 98% in terms of a soybean protein decomposition rate expressed by a solubilization degree of a protein component in 15% trichloroacetic acid, heating (a) the hydrolyzation mixture at a temperature of 75°C or higher which does not inactivate the enzyme for 10(5.25-0.05 x T) minutes, wherein T is heating temperature (°C), or shorter, cooling the hydrolyzation mixture until the temperature drops to 30°C or lower, separating and removing insolubles from the mixture to obtain a supernatant, and heat-sterilizing (b) the supernatant for longer than 10(5.25-0.05 X T) minutes, wherein T is heating temperature (°C), in such a degree that the enzyme remaining is substantially inactivated and the remaining viable count is 10 or less. The process according to claim 1, wherein insolubles are separated and removed at a pH of the soybean protein solution of 4.0-6.2, or the soybean protein solution contains an alkaline earth metal compound or a protein flocculating agent. The process according to claim 1, wherein the soybean protein solution is hydrolyzed with a proteolytic enzyme to a degree of hydrolysis of 50 to 90% in terms of a soybean protein decomposition rate expressed by a solubilization degree of a protein component in 15% trichloroacetic acid. The process according to claim 1, wherein the separation and removal of insolubles in step (a) is carried out by centrifugation.
Anspruch[fr]
Procédé pour produire un hydrolysat de protéine de soja, qui comporte les étapes consistant à hydrolyser une solution de protéine de soja avec une enzyme protéolytique à un degré d'hydrolyse de 20 à 98 % en termes de vitesse de décomposition d'une protéine de soja exprimée par un degré de solubilisation d'un composant de protéine dans de l'acide trichloracétique à 15 %, chauffer (a) le mélange d'hydrolysation à une température de 75°C ou plus qui n'inactive pas l'enzyme pendant 10 (5,25 - 0,05 × T) minutes, T étant une température de chauffage (°C), ou moins, refroidir le mélange d'hydrolysation jusqu'à ce que la température chute à 30°C ou moins, séparer et enlever des insolubles du mélange afin d'obtenir un liquide surnageant, et stériliser à chaud (b) le liquide surnageant pendant plus longtemps que 10 (5,25-0,05 × T) minutes, T étant une température de chauffage (°C), à un degré tel que l'enzyme restante est sensiblement inactivée, et le nombre exploitable restant est 10 ou moins. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les insolubles sont séparés et enlevés à un pH de la solution de protéine de soja de 4,0 à 6,2, ou la solution de protéine de soja contient un composé de métal alcalino-terreux, ou un floculant de protéine. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la solution de protéine de soja est hydrolysée avec une enzyme protéolytique à un degré d'hydrolyse de 50 à 90 % en termes de vitesse de décomposition d'une protéine de soja exprimée par un degré de solubilisation d'un composant de protéine dans de l'acide trichloracétique à 15 %. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la séparation et le déplacement d'insolubles dans l'étape (a) sont effectués par centrifugation.






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