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Dokumentenidentifikation EP0695884 07.04.2005
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0000695884
Titel Element mit einer Beschichtung aus festem Schmiermittel für ein Wälzlager mit Fettschmierung
Anmelder SKF Engineering and Research Centre B.V., Nieuwegein, NL
Erfinder Wan, George Tin Yau, NL-3993 HN Houten, NL;
Jacobson, Bo Olov, NL-3706 TG Zeist, NL
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 69534033
Vertragsstaaten DE, FR, GB
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 27.07.1995
EP-Aktenzeichen 952020683
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 07.02.1996
EP date of grant 02.03.2005
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 07.04.2005
IPC-Hauptklasse F16C 33/56
IPC-Nebenklasse F16C 33/44   F16C 33/66   

Beschreibung[en]

The present invention relates to a greased rolling element bearing, in which elements of the bearing such as the bearing cage or roller ends have been coated with a solid lubricant coating.

Rolling element bearings usually comprise an outer and an inner ring, rolling elements in the bearing space between said rings, and a cage for holding the rolling elements at a predetermined mutual spacing as well as a grease for providing lubrication.

Despite the presence of said grease, during service of such a bearing, the cage and the rolling elements are in sliding contact. This results in friction and wear, which limit the service life of such a sliding contact.

Document GB 826 091 A describes cages with a metallic body coated with a thin layer of plastic such as polyamide or poly tetrafluorethylene containing about 3% of MoS2 or graphite.

In order to reduce the friction and wear it is known to apply a manganese phosphate-coating in the cage pockets which contain the rolling elements. However, such a manganese phosphate coating is not satisfactory for several reasons. One reason is that these coatings are only useful for "running in" the bearing, e.g. only provide an initial reduction of the friction at the beginning of the service life. After a certain period, the phosphate coating will disappear causing metal to metal contact, a higher running temperature and/or the deterioration of the grease which is located in the bearing. In some cases this can locally lead to "burnt" grease and/or dry running of the bearing. Therefore, some grease lubricated roller bearings with standard manganese phosphate coated steel cages give diminutive tribological protection in the contacts between roller and cage pocket. This will generally lead to the formation of brown bands on rollers and raceways. This is attributed to high sliding contact stress and poor lubrication conditions between roller and cage contacts.

Other factors which adversely influence the condition of the grease in the bearing, the running temperature, and the useful service life of the bearing are the high thermal stressing which occurs between the bearing cage and the rolling elements, and the lack of supply of grease between the components of the bearing.

As a result of these problems, bearings which comprise phosphate-coated cages should be relubricated frequently; if such frequent lubrication is omitted, the useful service life of the bearing is impaired.

The object of the invention is therefore to provide a rolling element bearing which does not suffer from the above disadvantages. This object is achieved in that the bearing cage is coated with a coating for lowering the running temperature of the cage, and thus of the bearing.

The invention therefore relates to a bearing cage for a rolling element bearing, which cage is coated with a solid lubricant containing coating for lowering the running temperature of the cage containing a disulphide or diselenide of a Group V or VI transition metal. According to an especially preferred embodiment, the coating contains MoS2 and/or WS2, optionally in combination with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

A number of rolling element bearings with MoS2-coatings present on the cage and/or as a solid lubricant are known in the art, vide for instance US-A-3 500 525, JP-A-62 141 314 and JP-A-3 255 223. However, all these references relate to bearings for use in (high) vacuum and/or at elevated temperatures (250°C or more), which for obvious reasons cannot be subjected to grease lubrication. Such non-grease lubricated bearings for use in a high vacuum/temperature environment are not claimed by the present application.

British patent specification GB 1 515 643 A describes bearings of the ball and roller type, in which the balls and rollers are retained in position by a cage, said cage having a covering of a low friction plastics material such as PTFE in order to reduce contact friction.

However, this reference is silent with respect to solid lubricants containing coatings, such as MoS2 and/or WS2 containing coatings. As will be seen from the examples hereinbelow, the presence of such a coating, such as a MoS2/PTFE containing coating, on the bearing cage has a favourable influence on the properties of the grease in the bearing, also when compared to a coating containing PTFE alone.

Although not limited thereto, it is believed that the presence of solid lubricants according to the invention in the polymeric coating provide for improved affinity with the grease/oil and an increase in load carrying properties under poor lubrication conditions, thereby increasing the grease life.

Furthermore, it is well known in the art that the wear rate of PTFE is very poor, so that a bearing with PTFE alone will have a relatively short lifetime compared to the solid lubricant coatings of the present application.

The term "solid lubricant" is well known in the art and can generally be defined as a solid material with low friction and low wear rate. The term "solid lubricant coating" is therefore herein defined as a coating with good adhesion containing said solid lubricants.

According to the invention said solid lubricant comprises a disulfide or diselenide of a transitional metal of group V or VI of the periodic table of the elements, and/or a combination thereof. Especially preferred solid lubricants are MoS2 and WS2. Such coatings are well known in the art and are for instance described in the abovementioned references.

The solid lubricant of the invention is preferably present in admixture with an organic resin, such as PTFE, polyamide, or other polymeric materials such as polycarboxindole, or polypyrrole. These resins function as a binder so as to carry the solid lubricant giving a much better bearing performance.

Commercially available examples of MoS2 containing coatings are the MoS2/PTFE containing coating produced by the Eeonyx-company, USA, the PTFE/MoS2 coating produced by Dowty, Great Britain (product 1052) and the MoS2 containing Molykote coating 7409 (Dow Corning).

An example of a commercially available WS2 coating is Dichronite.

Such coatings are well known in the art and were used in the prior art for corrosion protection, and permanent lubrication of bolts, hinges etc. as well as the lubrication of engine and gear parts, e.g. pistons.

The present invention is based on the surprising finding that during service, bearings which are coated with solid lubricant coatings according to the invention still have an effective amount of grease in place on their surfaces, even though these coated surfaces show less friction than the metallic surfaces usually present in non-coated bearings. Due to the lower friction of the coating it was to be expected that the solid lubricant coatings would be less effective in holding the lubricant into place on the cage.

During service of the bearing, all elements of the bearing which are in sliding contact should have lubricant present on their contact surfaces. Especially in for instance rolling element bearings, there is a constant pressure forcing out the grease due to the centrifugal forces which act on the grease as the bearing rotates at high speed. It was therefore to be expected that with cages, coated with a solid lubricant coating, that the grease would be forced out of the critical contact surfaces and/or even thrown off the cage entirely, therefore reducing the amount of lubricant available for lubrication.

However, according to the present invention it has now been found that the negative effect of the solid lubricant coating according to the invention on holding the lubricant in place is more than offset by the lower running temperature which is obtained when such a solid lubricant coating is used on the cages. Because of this, the solid lubricant coating has an overall positive effect on the grease life, the service life of the bearing as well as the lubrication intervals required.

In this respect coatings containing said solid lubricants in a plastics material such as PTFE give better results than coatings containing PTFE alone, such as described in GB patent specification 1,515,643. Due to their higher surface tension, the MoS2 coatings give better "wetting" of the surfaces of the cage with the oil and/or grease, improved grease/oil affinity and adhesion and an increase in load carrying properties, thereby further improving grease life.

The better adhesion of the solid lubricant containing coatings according to the invention to the coated surfaces is also an important factor in holding the grease in place.

Besides giving a lower running temperature and better adhesion of the lubricant, these coatings also provide better adhesion to the substrate (e.g. the bearing cage) than the phosphate coatings and/or PTFE coatings of the state of the art, so that they are effective during a longer period of time.

Another advantage of the PTFE/MoS2 coatings is that they are less hazardous to the environment than, for instance, lead containing coatings.

The invention is, however, not limited to MoS2/PTFE containing coatings, and any solid lubricant coating according to the invention which gives a low running temperature of the cage and/or bearing can be used. Such solid lubricant coatings can be easily determined by a man skilled in he art by means of the methods described in the Example, i.e. determining the running temperature of the bearing in a manner known per se. Preferably, the solid lubricant coatings also show good adhesion to the substrate.

According to the present invention the entire cage can be coated with the solid lubricant coating, or just the parts and surfaces of the cage which are in sliding contact with the rolling elements or guide rings, such as the cage pockets and/or cage bars, as will be clear to a man skilled in the art. Coating the cage bars with a solid lubricant coating according to the invention can also be used to create smaller, more accurate cage pockets with lower friction.

The coating according to the invention will give an improvement in cage performance in ball and roller bearings; which improves the bearing fatigue life, as can be seen in bearing life tests. The coating according to the invention can be used in the bore of, for instance, vibrating screen bearings (SRB).

Applying a solid lubricant polymer coating, preferably containing PTFE sintered with defined thickness 10-15 µm giving a cage pocket with defined pocket play and a defined cage bar shape, which allows the cage for eccentric running, gives an ideal combination for improving the rolling element guidance. In doing so, negative aspects, such as an increased cage friction by a wear process, scraping off of the lubricant and metal to metal contact, high noise from the cage, and a low life are avoided by using a solid lubricant coating according to the invention in this kind of application.

According to a preferred embodiment, both the cage pockets and the cage bars are coated with a solid lubricant coating according to the invention for lowering the running temperature.

By coating the cage of a rolling element bearing with such a coating, the following advantages are obtained:

  • a lower running temperature of the cage and the bearing as compared to the manganese phosphate coatings of the state of the art;
  • the grease around the contacts remains in good condition for a longer period of time resulting in an improvement of the overall lubrication;
  • local burning of grease does not occur;
  • a longer useful service life of the rolling element bearing.
  • a better retention of the grease lubricant in the cage, in particular on the cage bars which are situated between the rolling elements and which slide along these elements.
  • longer relubrication intervals;
  • lower thermal stressing with respect to the rolling elements;
  • better retention of the lubricant on the rolling elements themselves, leading to a less, even no brown band formation on these elements and the rings;
  • the presence of a thicker lubricant layer on the rolling elements, which lubricant layer will not easily be scraped off by the cage bars, thereby also providing a better lubrication between the rolling elements and the bearing rings;
  • the coated surfaces of the invention can be provided with grooves for transporting the lubricant to the contact surfaces, giving even better lubrication of the critical surfaces during service.

In service, during overrolling the lubricant film is slowly moved out of the contact track. In non-vibrating starved lubricated line contact bearings and other types of lubricated bearings, the grooves in the coated surfaces could provide an additional active mechanism to replenish/redistribute the lubricant film, thereby preventing lubricant film break-down and subsequent bearing failure. By applying a pattern of grooves on the cage wall the sliding motion between roller and cage bar will induce a lubricant motion towards the centre and thus concentrate the lubricant in the center of the track, counteracting the lubricant film break-down and its consequences described above. By applying the same patterns of grooves on both the cage bars, the lubricant film transport towards the center of the rolling track occurs irrespective of the bearing rotation direction. Therefore, these grooves will give a decrease in contact stress and an increase in both grease and bearing life. The form and number of the grooves will be dependent on, for instance, the cage and bearing used and the application of suitable grooves will be apparent to a man skilled in the art.

The solid lubricant coatings according to the invention can be applied to the cage by any suitable method, such as dipping, spraying etc., which methods will be obvious to a man skilled in the art, and/or are described in for instance the abovementioned prior art. Preferably however, the PTFE/MoS2 coating is applied by means of "shot peening", which is described in US patent application 5,262,241. Cages coated by this method give even better results than the cages coated by spraying or dipping.

Preferably, the coating has a thickness of 5-10µm. It is, however, possible to apply a thicker coating in order to obtain a cage pocket that gives better guidance to the rolling element while maintaining the solid lubricant according to the invention. The use of solid lubricant coatings according to the invention can also greatly improve the tribological performance of roller-flange contact of taper roller bearing lubrication. This application overcomes the poor lubrication and wear problems of roller-flange contacts in service, in particular under high applied axial loading condition. The bearing life improvement can be simply done by applying the said coatings on the roller ends. The contact temperature will be reduced, and minimal metallic wear is resulted, and thus, longer lubricant life is expected.

The invention therefore further relates to the use of MoS2 and/or WS2 containing coatings as defined in claim 7.

The invention will now be illustrated by means of the following example in which the performance of the solid lubricant coatings according to the invention for lowering the running temperature is compared to a manganese phosphate coating according to the state of the art, as well as a PRCA-coating, which does not give a lower running temperature and a coating containing PTFE alone. The Figures 1-5 are running temperature graphs vs time for the bearings used in the Examples, showing:

  • Figure 1: Bearing performance of standard phosphate cages
  • Figure 2: Bearing performance of PCRA-coated cages (comparative)
  • Figure 3: Bearing performance of Eeonyx-coated cages (invention)
  • Figure 4a: Bearing performance of Dowty-coated cages (invention)
  • Figure 4b: Bearing performance of Molykote-coated cages (invention)
  • Figure 5: Bearing performance of selected coatings on cages

Example 1. Bearing test

The bearing test with standard and coated cages were conducted according to the SKF R2F "A" test conditions as shown in Table 1. TEST BEARING 22312 E/C3 SRB SPEED 2500 rpm RADIAL LOAD 8.5 KN TEMPERATURE Self-induced TEST GREASE Mostly Alvania R3 (Shell) / LGMT3 (SKF) C/P 32 TEST TIME 20 days

2. Test materials

Polymer coated SRB cages based on methylacrylate and/or fluoro-polymer, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) / MoS2 were used in this study. Both proprietary and commercial coating processes based on these materials were used to produce coatings on cages. Details of the coatings and suppliers are listed in Table 2 Coating supplier Coating material manufacturer Coating process Main coating compositions Polymer Research Corp of America (PRCA), USA PRCA "Chemical grafting" (US-A-3,698,931) Methylacrylate, Fluoro polymer (proprietary formulations) Eeonyx (Formerly Preemptive technologies), USA Eeonyx "Shot peening" (US-A-5,262,241) PTFE/MoS2 Dowty, England Whitford Spraying (commercially available) PTFE/MoS2 (Product 1052) Mavom, The Netherlands Molykote Dipping (commercially available) MoS2 (Product 7409)

All test cages used were based on the standard E design. At the time of the project, plain steel cages i.e. untreated cages could not be obtained, all polymer/anti-friction coated cages were executed based on pre-phosphate cages. The phosphate coating was removed at the cage factory (SKF Kogellagerindustrie, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) by rotor finishing. Table 3 summarises the test program conducted. Bearing no. Coating Company Coating Type/no. Grease Used 1 PRCA No.59 Alvania R3 2 SKF Standard phosphate Alvania R3 3 PRCA No.55 Alvania R3 4 SKF Standard phosphate Alvania R3 5 PRCA No.60 Alvania R3 6 PRCA No.61 Alvania R3 7 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 Alvania R3 8 Eeonyx PTFE/NoS2 Alvania R3 9 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 LGMT3 "mod" 10 SKF Standard phosphate LGMT3 "mod" 11 Dowty PTFE/MoS2 (1052) Alvania R3 12 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 Alvania R3 13 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 Alvania R3 14 Mavom* Molykote (7409) Alvania R3 15 Mavom* Molykote (7409) + phosphating pretreatment Alvania R3
* Representative of Dow Corning in the Netherlands

3. Performance ranking

All tested bearings were ranked according to their performance with respect to the running temperature (ΔT) and visual damage inspection.

Running Temperature

The bearing temperature (outer ring) was continuously monitored and recorded via computer until the end of the test duration. The pre-set temperature limit for the termination of test is 200°C. The actual bearing running temperature, ΔT, reported is the difference between the outer ring surface temperature and the ambient temperature. Interpretation is generally based on that low running temperature ensures small solid lubricant losses and a smooth plot usually implies a good performance.

Visual inspection

The rolling elements and the cages of all test bearings were investigated and graded according to the following levels. The higher the score, the better the cage performed its tribological function. The ranking was conducted per bearing side. 5: roller almost as new/little or no wear on roller-cage bar contacts 4: roller with some scratches/slight wear on roller-cage bar contacts 3: small brown or polished bands (< 30% roller surface)/small wear on roller-cage bar contacts 2: moderate brown or polished bands (30-50% roller surface)/medium-high wear on roller-cage contacts 1: large brown/polished bands (> 50% roller surface)/medium-high wear on roller-cage contacts

4. Test Results a. Performance of standard manganese phosphate coated cages (prior art)

Three bearings with standard phosphate coated cages were tested. The high temperature peaks observed for all tests (see Fig.1) indicate problems of bearing lubrication under test conditions. The duration of all temperature peaks observed is relatively short, and the subsequent drop is probably due to lubricant replenishment. It is suggested that the rapid rise in temperature is mainly due to the high frictional losses between roller and cage pocket contacts. The average running temperature, ΔT, was noted to be in the range of 45-50°C (see Fig. 1).

Visual inspections of the test bearings (nos. 2, 4 & 10) were conducted. The ranking is shown in Table 4. The grading of 3 and below indicate the formation of brown bands on rollers and raceways. The phosphate coating on cage contacts was completely removed and medium/high cage contact wear was observed. The results of these tests are in agreement with many previous observations for grease lubricated roller bearing tested under extreme conditions.

b. Performance of PRCA coated cages (comparative)

Figure 2 shows the performance of PRCA grafting polymer coating on cages. The compositions of these coatings were based on fluoro- and acrylate-polymers. It can be seen that high running temperature (>50 °C) and high temperature peaks were recorded for all bearings tested with PRCA coated cages. It is suggested that the very high running temperature, in particular during the first few days resulted from a thicker coating compared with the standard coating thickness. The high temperature peaks are primarily due to the lack of lubricant supply to rolling/sliding contacts and the coatings applied could not prevent high friction forces generated in contacts. The ranking of these bearings (nos. 1, 3, 5 & 6) were unsatisfactory as shown in Table 4. Interestingly, bearing 1 showed no heavy brown bands on rolling elements, but circumferential wear scratches on rollers. The cage contacts revealed high wear on coatings and slight to medium wear on the metal of the cage bar. Also, the PRCA-coatings showed poor adhesion to the metal substrates making them unsuitable for moderate/high stress sliding applications.

c. Performance of Eeonyx coated cages

A number of experiments were conducted to observe the performance of the Eeonyx polymer coating on SRB cages. Figure 3 shows the running temperature of 5 bearings tested. Although few temperature peaks were observed for three bearing runs, it can be seen that the overall running temperature is low compared with the standard phosphate coating or the PRCA coatings. The low running temperature implies solid lubricant between roller and cage contacts, and the temperature peak observed for the bearings tested is attributed to inconsistent quality of the coating process. Bearings No.7 and No.12 performed really well under test conditions.

Table 4 shows the performance ranking of this coating type. No brown bands occurred on the bearing elements of nos. 7 and 12. The other 3 bearings tested, however, revealed some discoloured bands on only one side of bearing rollers. This observation is in a very good agreement with the results of bearing running temperature as discussed above. Bearings performed with ranking 5 showed minimal cage wear, and a slight wear on steel of the cages is observed for bearing ranking 3. It must be noted that the thickness of the coating deposited is about 5µm and it is envisaged that a slightly thicker coating would improve the performance.

d. Performance of other anti-friction coatings

Commercially available coating processes based on PTFE/Mo2S or MoS2 were also investigated. Figures 4A and 4B show the running temperature for 4 bearings tested. It can be seen that there is no abnormal or rapid temperature rise and the overall temperature recorded was in the region of 40°C. This means that the average running temperature is about 5-10°C lower than the standard phosphate coating. The cages of bearing 16 were deliberately tested with a residual phosphate + MoS2 coating. The test result suggests that the bearing performance is not significantly affected whether the cages are phosphated prior to MoS2 coating or not. The bearing performance ranking of all bearings tested with these commercial anti-friction coatings on cages were excellent as shown in Table 4. Minimal cage wear is observed for all bearing tested. Test Bearing no. Coating Company Coating type/no. Visual Ranking (bearing conditions side 1 side 2 1 PRCA no.59 4/3 4/3 2 SKF standard 3 3 3 PRCA no.55 4 & 3 4 & 3 4 SKF standard 3 2 5 PRCA no.60 4 & 3 4 & 3 6 PRCA no.61 4 & 3 4 & 3 7 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 5 5 8 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 3 5 9 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 5 3 10 SKF standard 3 3 11 Dowty PTFE/MoS2 (1052) 5 5 12 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 5 5 13 Eeonyx PTFE/MoS2 5 3 14 Mavom Molykote (7409) 5 5/4 15 Mavom Molykote (7409) 5 5

e. Summary: comparison between selected coated cages

Figure 5 shows a comparison between the bearing performance of non-coated steel cages, phosphate cages, PTFE/MoS2 cages (Eeonyx, Dowty) and MoS2 (Molykote 7409) coated cages. It can be generally concluded that the MoS2 containing solid lubricant coatings performed better than the standard cages with or without phosphate coating. The results clearly conclude that a solid lubricant coating can improve the bearing performance by eliminating the formation of brown bands on rollers and raceways.

5. Conclusions

Based on the above results it can be concluded that the problem associated with the formation of brown bands on rollers and raceways of grease lubricated roller bearings can be eliminated by means of a solid lubricant coating for lowering the running temperature, such as a PTFE/MoS2 or MoS2 (Molykote) coating on bearing cages. Lower running temperature by 5-10°C is expected compared with manganese phosphate coated cages.

Three processes have been used to deposit the chemicals on to metal surfaces and bearing cages. The advantage of Eeonyx's process is a fast mechanical method, it can tailor coating thickness down to 3-5µm and involves no other chemical carriers. The commercial spraying and dipping processes utilise other chemical binders and require high temperature curing.


Anspruch[de]
  1. Geschmiertes Wälzlager, einen äußeren und inneren Ring, Wälzelemente im Lagerzwischenraum zwischen den Ringen und einen Käfig, um die Wälzelemente in einem vorbestimmten wechselseitigen Abstand zu halten, umfassend, wobei der Käfig mit einem festen Schmiermittel beschichtet ist, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die feste Schmiermittelbeschichtung ein Disulfid und/oder Diselenid eines Übergangsmetalls der Gruppe V oder VI enthält.
  2. Geschmiertes Wälzlager nach Anspruch 1, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die Beschichtung MoS2 und/oder WS2 enthält, vorzugsweise mit einem organischen Harz wie PTFE.
  3. Geschmiertes Wälzlager nach Anspruch 1 oder 2, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die Beschichtung mittels "Kugelstrahlen" auf dem Käfig aufgebracht wird.
  4. Geschmiertes Wälzlager gemäß einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 3, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die Dicke der Beschichtung 5 bis 12 µm beträgt.
  5. Geschmiertes Wälzlager gemäß einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 4, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass das Lager ein Pendelrollenlager ist.
  6. Verfahren zur Verringerung der Lauftemperatur der Käfige von geschmierten Wälzlagern zur Erhöhung der Lebensdauer des Schmiermittels in einem geschmierten Wälzlager und/oder zur Erhöhung der Nutzungsdauer eines geschmierten Wälzlagers, wobei das geschmierte Wälzlager einen äußeren und einen inneren Ring, Wälzelemente im Lagerzwischenraum zwischen den Ringen und einen Käfig, um die Wälzelemente in einem vorbestimmten wechselseitigen Abstand zu halten, umfasst, wobei das Verfahren dadurch gekennzeichnet ist, dass der Lagerkäfig oder das Rollenende mit einer festen Schmiermittelbeschichtung gemäß einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 5 beschichtet ist.
  7. Verwendung von MoS2 und/oder WS2 enthaltenden festen Schmiermittelbeschichtungen auf Käfigen von geschmierten Wälzlagern zur Verringerung der Lauftemperatur von Rollenschlussflanschkontakten, Wälzelementkäfigen und/oder Lagern, zur Erhöhung der Lebensdauer des Schmiermittels im Lager und/oder zur Erhöhung der brauchbaren Nutzungsdauer eines geschmierten Wälzlagers.
Anspruch[en]
  1. Greased rolling element bearing comprising an outer and inner ring, rolling elements in the bearing space between said rings, and a cage for holding the rolling elements at a predetermined mutual spacing, which cage is coated with a solid lubricant, characterized in that the solid lubricant coating contains a disulphide and/or diselenide of a Group V or VI transition metal.
  2. Greased rolling element bearing according to claim 1, characterized in that the coating contains MoS2 and/or WS2, preferably with an organic resin such as PTFE.
  3. Greased rolling element bearing according to claims 1 or 2, characterized in that the coating is applied onto the cage by means of "Shot peening".
  4. Greased rolling element bearing according to claims 1-3, characterized in that the thickness of the coating is 5-12 µm.
  5. Greased rolling element bearing according to claim 1-4, characterized in that the bearing is a spherical roller bearing.
  6. Method for lowering the running temperature of cages of a greased rolling element bearing, improving the life of the grease present in a greased rolling element bearing and/or improving the service life of a greased rolling element bearing, wherein the greased rolling element bearing comprises an outer and an inner ring, rolling elements in the bearing space between said rings, and a cage for holding the rolling elements at a predetermined mutual spacing, said method being characterized in that the bearing cage or roller end is coated with a solid lubricant coating in accordance with any of the claims 1-5.
  7. Use of MoS2 and/or WS2 containing solid lubricant coatings on cages of greased rolling element bearings for lowering the running temperature of roller end flange contacts, rolling element cages and/or bearings, improving the life of the grease present in the bearing and/or improving the useful service life of a greased rolling element bearing.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse comprenant une bague extérieure et une bague intérieure, des éléments roulants dans l'espace du coussinet entre lesdites bagues, et une cage pour maintenir les éléments roulants avec un espacement mutuel prédéterminé, laquelle cage est revêtue d'un lubrifiant solide,caractérisé en ce que le revêtement de lubrifiant solide contient un disulfure et/ou diséléniure d'un métal de transition du Groupe V ou VI.
  2. Roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse selon la revendication 1, caractérisé en ce que le revêtement contient MoS2 et/ou WS2, de préférence avec une résine organique telle que du PTFE.
  3. Roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse selon les revendications 1 ou 2, caractérisé en ce que le revêtement est appliqué sur la cage au moyen de martelage à la grenaille ronde.
  4. Roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse selon les revendications 1 à 3, caractérisé en ce que l'épaisseur du revêtement est 5 à 12 µm.
  5. Roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse selon les revendications 1 à 4, caractérisé en ce que le roulement est un roulement à rouleaux sphérique.
  6. Procédé pour diminuer la température de fonctionnement des cages d'un roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse, améliorant la durée de vie de la graisse présente dans le roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse et/ou améliorant la durée de service d'un roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse, dans lequel le roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse comprend une bague extérieure et une bague intérieure, des éléments roulants dans l'espace du coussinet entre lesdites bagues, et une cage pour maintenir les éléments roulants avec un espacement mutuel prédéterminé, ledit procédé étant caractérisé en ce que la cage du coussinet ou l'extrémité du rouleau est revêtu d'un revêtement lubrifiant solide selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 5.
  7. Utilisation de revêtements de lubrifiant solide contenant MoS2 et/ou WS2 sur des cages de coussinets d'élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse pour diminuer la température de fonctionnement des contacts de collerette d'extrémité de rouleau, des cages et/ou coussinets d'élément roulant, améliorant la durée de vie de la graisse présente dans le roulement et/ou améliorer la durée de service utile d'un roulement à élément roulant lubrifié à la graisse.






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