PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP1742084 22.02.2007
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0001742084
Titel System und Verfahren zur Georegistrierung mit globaler Positionierung und Trägheitsnavigation
Anmelder Raytheon Company, Waltham, Mass., US
Erfinder Chiou, Kuo-Liang, West Hills, CA 91304-5717, US;
Chiou, Carroll C., West Hills, CA 91304-5717, US;
Rudolph, Kevin E., Manhattan Beach, CA 90266-4212, US
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, BG, CH, CY, CZ, DE, DK, EE, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, HU, IE, IS, IT, LI, LT, LU, LV, MC, NL, PL, PT, RO, SE, SI, SK, TR
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 01.06.2006
EP-Aktenzeichen 062528484
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 10.01.2007
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 22.02.2007
IPC-Hauptklasse G01S 13/86(2006.01)A, F, I, 20061212, B, H, EP
IPC-Nebenklasse G01S 7/40(2006.01)A, L, I, 20061212, B, H, EP   G01S 13/90(2006.01)A, L, I, 20061212, B, H, EP   G01S 5/14(2006.01)A, L, I, 20061212, B, H, EP   

Beschreibung[en]
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention:

The present invention relates to inertial navigation and global position. More specifically, the present invention relates to systems and methods for improving the GPS counter-jamming performance of inertial navigation systems.

Description of the Related Art:

Inertial navigation systems typically use gyroscopes and accelerometers to provide precision vehicular navigation. Unfortunately, inertial navigation accuracy degrades because of instrument calibration errors and other errors. These navigation errors typically grow as a function of time. Independent observations of the vehicle navigation information are needed to bind these navigation errors. Therefore, sensors, other than INS, are needed in order to obtain independent navigation information. Hence, a conventional approach for correcting these errors involves the integration of a Global Position System (GPS) receiver with the inertial navigation system. However, the GPS is vulnerable to jamming which can impede the ability of the GPS system to correct the inertial navigation errors.

Typically, to counter the effects of GPS jamming, designers have endeavored to: 1) improve the accuracy of the inertial navigation system and 2) make the GPS receiver resistant to jamming. However, these approaches are expensive and limited in efficacy.

Hence, a need remains in the art for an effective yet inexpensive system or method for improving the navigation accuracy of integrated inertial navigation and Global Positioning Systems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The need in the art is addressed by the position estimation system of the present invention. In a most general implementation, the inventive system includes a first arrangement for providing an image including a known target in a known reference frame. A second arrangement correlates the image with a stored image. The correlation is used to compute an error with respect to a position estimate.

In a specific embodiment, the error is referenced with respect to first (x), second (y) and third (z) directions. A target location error is computed with respect to a stored image provided by a target image catalog. The target image catalog includes target geo-locations and digital terrain elevation data. In an illustrative application, the image data is provided by synthetic aperture radar or forward-looking infrared systems. An observation model and a measure noise matrix are Kalman filtered to ascertain a position error in navigation data generated by an integrated inertial navigation and Global Positioning system.

In the illustrative application, geo-registered SAR/FLIR imagery is used to track targets and to determine a target location error (TLE). This TLE information is a set of error equations that describe the relationship between vehicle navigation information and target data. In accordance with the invention, this relationship is used to form an observation model for vehicle navigation with respect to target locations. Using Kalman filtering and the observation model, vehicle navigation errors can be bound and the navigation accuracy of the vehicle can be improved.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

  • Fig. 1 is a block diagram of an illustrative implementation of a position estimation system in accordance with the present teachings.
  • Fig. 2 is a simplified flow diagram showing an illustrative implementation of a position estimation method in accordance with the present teachings.
  • Fig. 3 is a diagram showing a geo-sighting error model in three dimensions in accordance with an illustrative application of the present teachings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Illustrative embodiments and exemplary applications will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings to disclose the advantageous teachings of the present invention.

While the present invention is described herein with reference to illustrative embodiments for particular applications, it should be understood that the invention is not limited thereto. Those having ordinary skill in the art and access to the teachings provided herein will recognize additional modifications, applications, and embodiments within the scope thereof and additional fields in which the present invention would be of significant utility.

In general, in accordance with the present teachings, geo-registered SAR/FLIR imagery is used to track targets and to determine a target location error (TLE). The TLE is generated by a set of error equations that describe the relationship between the vehicle (sensor) navigation information and the target location. The geo-registered images obtained from SAR/FLIR systems provide position estimates for a known pixel on the ground or other reference frame through target recognition methods. This position estimate serves as an independent observation to bind errors in an inertial navigation system.

U. S. Patent No. 5,485,384 entitled ON-BOARD NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR AN AERIAL CRAFT INCLUDING A SYNTHETIC APERTURE SIDEWAYS LOOKING RADAR issued January 16, 1996 to B. Falconnet (hereinafter the "Falconnet" patent) the teachings of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference appears to teach the use of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensors to obtain target imagery in the x and y horizontal plane. (See also U. S. Patent No. 5,432,520 issued July 11, 1995 to Schneider et al. and entitled SAR/GPS INERTIAL METHOD OF RANGE MEASUREMENT, the teachings of which are herby incorporated herein by reference.) This imagery is then correlated with maps of the geo-locations that are pre-stored in the database to obtain two error equations in the x and y directions. These two error equations serve as an observation model for the Kalman filter to bind the vehicle navigation errors.

In accordance with the present invention, Falconnet's teachings are extended by: 1) including a third dimensional axis, the altitude of a target image location and 2) providing a specific teaching as to how the third dimension can be used to improve the navigational accuracy of an integrated INS/GPS navigation system. The geo-registered imagery is extended to sensors from SAR or FLIR (forward-looking infrared) systems. A simple first order error model in the computed target geo-location is used to illustrate the effectiveness of Kalman filter updating using geo-registration imagery. Detailed x, y, and z observation equations are provided which involve the vehicle's position, velocity, and attitude, as well as the angle between the horizontal plane and the slant plane. The position error differences can be minimized through optimal estimation techniques, such as Kalman filter, to bind INS navigation errors. The equations form an observation matrix in a Kalman filter.

The method described in this invention can also be extended to any sensor on the vehicle that produces target location errors (TLE) on the known target image because the TLE equations can be reduced to a set of equations related to the vehicle navigation errors and target image position errors.

Fig. 1 is a block diagram of an illustrative implementation of a position estimation system in accordance with the present teachings. The inventive system 10 includes an antenna array 12 which feeds a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor 14. The sensor 14 is also adapted to process FLIR images. In accordance with the present teachings, the images provided by the SAR/FLIR sensor 14 are input to an image processor 16. The image processor 16 uses data from a catalog of geo-registered features 18 to identify a target in a known reference frame as discussed more fully below. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the known reference frame may be a surface other than the surface of the earth without departing from the scope of the present invention. The output of the image processor 16 is input to an INS/GPS integrator 20. The integrator 20 includes an INS processor 22, a GPS processor 26 and a Kalman filter 28. The INS processor 22 receives vehicle motion data from an on-board inertial measurement unit 24. The GPS processor 26 receives a GPS signal along with noise and, in some environments, a GPS jamming signal from a GPS receiver 25. The integrator 20 outputs vehicle position, velocity, and attitude errors to a guidance processor 30. The guidance processor 30 outputs vehicle position, velocity and attitude information, corrected in accordance with the present teachings, for use in a conventional manner. The guidance processor 30 also feeds position, velocity, and velocity errors and range from the sensor to the target, back to the SAR/FLIR sensor 14 for generating TLE equations.

Fig. 2 is a simplified flow diagram showing an illustrative implementation of a position estimation method in accordance with the present teachings. In the best mode, the method 100 is implemented in software by the image processor 16 of Fig. 1. As illustrated in Fig. 2, the method 100 includes the step 102 of providing a GPS signal from the GPS receiver 25 via the GPS processor 26 (Fig. 1) and the step 104 of providing vehicle position, velocity, attitude and errors from the IMU 24 via the INS processor 22 (Fig. 1). This data is analyzed by jamming logic at step 106 to ascertain whether a jamming signal 'J' is present and whether the jamming signal J exceeds a threshold 'T'.

If J < T, then the data from the INS and GPS processors 22 and 26 is input to the Kalman filter 28 (Fig. 1) directly at step 116.

If, however, J ≥ T, then at step 108 the system 10 generates target location error (TLE) equations drawing data from the catalog of geo-registered features 18 (Fig. 1) at step 110. Next, at step 112, the coordinates generated at step 108 are transformed. At step 114, an observation matrix (H) and a measurement noise matrix (R) are generated. At step 116, this data is passed to the Kalman filter to bind the navigation error as discussed above. At step 118, the output of the Kalman filtering step 116 is used in a guidance process in a conventional manner.

Returning to Fig. 1, the catalog 18 is defined as the image and location of each target image. This catalog details geo-locations and DTED (Digital Terrain Elevation Data). Based on the vehicle trajectory supplied by the INS/GPS process, the image processor 16 determines which geo-target in the catalog 18 needs to be sighted. The processor 16 then sends this information to the SAR/FLIR sensor 14 to locate and then to execute the geo-registered imagery. The SAR/FLIR sensor 14 determines the location of the geo-target and correlates this imagery with the information in the catalog to determine the accuracy of the observation.

Errors in computed target geo-location can be primarily attributed to three major sources: sensor position errors, sensor bearing errors and DTED errors. In accordance with the present teachings, these errors are treated as being statistically independent and zero mean Gaussian. For the sake of simplicity, all other errors are assumed to be relatively small and are ignored. It is also assumed that the image of the target can be acquired. The DTED noise is treated herein as part of the measurement noise in the z-direction of an ECEF (Earth Center Earth Fixed) coordinate frame.

Errors in the sensor are directly transformed into the slant coordinate frame and then transformed to the platform coordinate frame. The slant coordinate frame is defined as follows: xs is along the vehicle velocity axis , the zs is perpendicular to the slant plane which is the plane that passes through and , and ys forms a right-hand coordinate system.

Therefore, errors due to the sensor position errors in the slant coordinate frame are derived as follows: d x s = &Dgr; r v v + &Dgr; r R cos ϕ d y s = &Dgr; r R sin ϕ d z s = &Dgr; r V × R V × R

where &Dgr; and &Dgr; are the vectors of the vehicle navigation position and velocity errors, respectively, in the body coordinate frame. is the velocity vector of the vehicle, is the range vector from the vehicle position to the known geo-location, and &phgr; is the angle between the vehicle flight path and line of sight between vehicle and the target image.

The errors due to sensor bearing errors, in the slant coordinate frame, are derived as follows: d x s = &Dgr; V V V V + &Dgr; V V R cos ϕ d y s = &Dgr; V V R sin ϕ d z s = &Dgr; V V V × R V × R

Next, we combine the errors provided by equations [1] and [2] to obtain the following errors dxs, dys, and dzs that are in the slant coordinate frame. d x s = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V V + R cos ϕ d y s = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V R sin ϕ d z s = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V × R V × R Next, converting these errors, dxs, dys, and dzs into the platform coordinate frame by the angle &psgr; (see Figure 3).

Fig. 3 is a diagram showing a geo-sighting error model in three dimensions in accordance with an illustrative application of the present teachings. The platform coordinate frame (vehicle body coordinate frame) is defined as follows: xp is vehicle velocity direction, yp is the vehicle right wing, and zp forms a right hand coordinate system. The relationship between the slant coordinate frame and the platform coordinate frame is as follows: d x p d y p d z p = 1 0 0 0 cos &psgr; sin &psgr; 0 sin &psgr; cos &psgr; d x s d y s d z s Inserting equation [3] into equation [4]: d x p = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V V + R cos ϕ d y p = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V R sin ϕ cos &psgr; &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V × R V × R sin &psgr; d z p = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V R sin ϕ sin &psgr; + &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V × R V × R cos &psgr;

where: &psgr; = tan 1 R z R x 2 + R y 2 and R = R x , R y , R z . The classical Kalman filter is described as follows: x k = &PHgr; k 1 x k 1 + w k 1 , w k N 0 , Q k z k = H k x k + v k , v k N 0 , R k E x 0 = x 0 , E x ˜ 0 x ˜ 0 T = P 0 , E w j v k T = 0 j , k P k = &PHgr; k 1 P k 1 + &PHgr; k 1 T + Q k 1 P k + = I K k H k P k K k = P k H k T H k P k H k T + R k 1

where &PHgr;k is the transition matrix.

In accordance with the present teachings, an observation matrix Hk and the observation (measurement) noise Rk are generated as follows. Assume that &Dgr; and &Dgr; are the first six Kalman filter error states defined as &Dgr; = (&dgr;rx, &dgr;ry, &dgr;rz)T and &Dgr; = (&dgr;Vx, &dgr;Vy, &dgr;Vz)T in the platform coordinate frame where superscript T denotes the transpose of the vector. Note that if &Dgr; and &Dgr; are defined in the ECEF coordinate frame, then these error states need to be transformed into the platform frame where the error equations [5] are defined. The Kalman filter error state , observation matrix Hk, and measurement noise matrix Rk are denote as below: x k = &dgr; r x , &dgr; r y , &dgr; r z , &dgr; V x , &dgr; V y , &dgr; V z , 0 , , 0 T , H k = h 00 , h 01 , h 02 , h 03 , h 04 , h 05 , 0 , , 0 h 10 , h 11 , h 12 , h 13 , h 14 , h 15 , 0 , , 0 h 20 , h 21 , h 22 , h 23 , h 24 , h 25 , 0 , , 0 , and R k = r 00 , 0 , 0 0 , r 11 , 0 0 , 0 , r 22 Assume that the vectors = (Rx, Ry, Rz), V =| |(magnitude of ), R =| |, V V = p x , p y , p z , and V V × R R = q x , q y , q z .

Therefore, equation [5] can be expressed in the following forms: d x p = p x + R x sin ϕ &dgr; r x + p y + R y sin ϕ &dgr; r y + p z + R z sin ϕ &dgr; r z + p x + R x sin ϕ / V &dgr; V x + p y + R y sin ϕ / V &dgr; V y + p z + R z sin ϕ / V &dgr; V z d y p = R x sin ϕ cos &psgr; q x sin &psgr; &dgr; r x + R y sin ϕ cos &psgr; q y sin &psgr; &dgr; r y + R z sin ϕ cos &psgr; q z sin &psgr; &dgr; r z + R x sin ϕ cos &psgr; q x sin &psgr; / V &dgr; V x + R y sin ϕ cos &psgr; q y sin &psgr; / V &dgr; V y + R z sin ϕ cos &psgr; q z sin &psgr; / V &dgr; V z d z p = R x sin ϕ sin &psgr; + q x cos &psgr; &dgr; r x + R y sin ϕ sin &psgr; + q y cos &psgr; &dgr; r y + R z sin ϕ sin &psgr; + q z cos &psgr; &dgr; r z + R x sin ϕ sin &psgr; + q x cos &psgr; / V &dgr; V x + R y sin ϕ sin &psgr; + q y cos &psgr; / V &dgr; V y + R z sin ϕ sin &psgr; + q z cos &psgr; / V &dgr; V z

Therefore, the elements in the observation matrix are as follows: h 00 = p x + R x sinϕ h 01 = p y + R y sinϕ h 02 = p z + R z sinϕ h 03 = h 00 / V h 04 = h 01 / V h 05 = h 02 / V h 10 = R x sinϕ cos&psgr; - q x sin&psgr; h 11 = R y sinϕ cos&psgr; - q y sin&psgr; h 12 = R z sinϕ cos&psgr; - q z sin&psgr; h 13 = h 10 / V h 14 = h 11 / V h 15 = h 12 / V h 20 = R x sinϕ sin&psgr; + q x cos&psgr; h 21 = R y sinϕ sin&psgr; + q y cos&psgr; h 22 = R z sinϕ sin&psgr; + q z cos&psgr; h 23 = h 20 / V h 24 = h 21 / V h 25 = h 22 / V and r00, r11, and r22 represent the observation noise in the SAR/FLIR imager accuracy during the geo-target scan. The DTED noise is included in r22 term.

In the illustrative embodiment, the sensor position and attitude errors are converted into the slant coordinate frame and then into the platform frame. Errors that may be due to the SAR signal processing and ranging errors are ignored since these errors are assumed to be relatively small. If some of those errors are large enough to be considered, the same method can be used to transform these errors into the platform frame and obtain similar results as equation [11] below: d x p = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V V + R cos ϕ d y p = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V R sin ϕ cos &psgr; &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V × R V × R sin &psgr; d z p = &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V R sin ϕ sin &psgr; + &Dgr; r + &Dgr; V V V × R V × R cos &psgr;

The error states in the Kalman filter should include the vehicle navigation errors such as = (&Dgr;rx,&Dgr;ry,&Dgr;rz,&Dgr;Vx,&Dgr;Vy,&Dgr;Vz,...)T. The error equations above can be converted to an observation matrix in the Kalman filer as follows: H k = h 00 , h 01 , h 02 , h 03 , h 04 , h 05 , 0 , , 0 h 10 , h 11 , h 12 , h 13 , h 14 , h 15 , 0 , , 0 h 20 , h 21 , h 22 , h 23 , h 24 , h 25 , 0 , , 0

where hij are defined above.

In general, coordinate frames of the sensor errors and navigation error states in the Kalman filter are different. They need to transform into the same coordinate frame.

The error equations in Claim 1 are, in fact, a TLE in the platform coordinate frame. Based on this invention, any TLE can be extracted and converted into an observation matrix as described in equation (5).

If the sensor SAR/FLIR can only obtain two-dimensional images (dxp, dyp), the observation matrix will be a two-dimensional matrix: H k = h 00 , h 01 , h 02 , h 03 , h 04 , h 05 , 0 , , 0 h 10 , h 11 , h 12 , h 13 , h 14 , h 15 , 0 , , 0

where the elements hij are defined as before.

Thus, the present invention has been described herein with reference to a particular embodiment for a particular application. Those having ordinary skill in the art and access to the present teachings will recognize additional modifications applications and embodiments within the scope thereof.

It is therefore intended by the appended claims to cover any and all such applications, modifications and embodiments within the scope of the present invention.


Anspruch[en]
A position estimation system (10) characterized by: a sensor (14) for providing an image including a known target in a known reference frame; a processor (16) for correlating said image with a stored image; and an integrator (20) coupled to said processor (16) for computing an error in response to an output thereof. The invention of Claim 1 wherein said error is referenced with respect to first (x), second (y) and third (z) directions. The invention of Claim 1 wherein said error is a target location error. The invention of Claim 1wherein said stored image is provided by a catalog. The invention of Claim 4 wherein said catalog is a target image catalog. The invention of Claim 5 wherein said target image catalog includes target geo-locations. The invention of Claim 6 wherein said catalog includes digital terrain elevation data. The invention of Claim 1 wherein said integrator (20) is adapted to generate an observation model. The invention of Claim 8 further including an arrangement (28) for filtering said model to provide a position estimate. The invention of Claim 9 wherein said arrangement (28) is a Kalman filter. The invention of Claim 1 further including an arrangement (22, 24, 25, 26) for providing position data and means for computing said error in response thereto. The invention of Claim 11 wherein said arrangement for providing position data further includes a Global Positioning System receiver (25).






IPC
A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
B Arbeitsverfahren; Transportieren
C Chemie; Hüttenwesen
D Textilien; Papier
E Bauwesen; Erdbohren; Bergbau
F Maschinenbau; Beleuchtung; Heizung; Waffen; Sprengen
G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

Anmelder
Datum

Patentrecherche

Patent Zeichnungen (PDF)

Copyright © 2008 Patent-De Alle Rechte vorbehalten. eMail: info@patent-de.com