PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP1634781 21.06.2007
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0001634781
Titel Gurtaufroller
Anmelder KEY SAFETY SYSTEMS, INC., Sterling Heights, Mich., US
Erfinder Ver Hoven, Robert E., Harsens Island Michigan 48028, US;
Boelstler, Richard A., Lake Orion Michigan 48359, US
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 602005001096
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, BG, CH, CY, CZ, DE, DK, EE, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, HU, IE, IS, IT, LI, LT, LU, LV, MC, NL, PL, PT, RO, SE, SI, SK, TR
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 31.08.2005
EP-Aktenzeichen 050188648
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 15.03.2006
EP date of grant 09.05.2007
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 21.06.2007
IPC-Hauptklasse B60R 22/415(2006.01)A, F, I, 20060302, B, H, EP

Beschreibung[en]

The present invention relates. to a seat belt retractor having both ELR and ALR functionality.

As known in the art, ELR means an emergency locking retractor, which typically includes one or more inertial locking mechanisms, as more particularly illustrated in EP 0 228 729 A1. A typical ELR seat belt retractor includes both a vehicle sensitive locking mechanism and a web sensitive locking mechanism. The vehicle sensitive locking mechanism and the web sensitive locking mechanism may share common parts.

Often the vehicle sensitive locking mechanism includes a housing member that is rotationally mounted relative to a side of the retractor frame as well as to the retractor spool. This housing member is called a lock cup. This housing member supports a movable inertial mass configured as a ball or standing man. Acceleration in excess of a limit or severe rotation beyond a limit of the vehicle value moves this inertial mass, which initiates lockup of the retractor. The housing member typically includes a rotationally supported pawl, also referred to as a sensor pawl since it cooperates with the inertial mass. Movement of the inertial mass causes movement of the sensor pawl from a deactivated position to an activated position.

In the activated position the inertial pawl engages one or more teeth of a ratchet wheel. The ratchet wheel is loosely supported for rotation about the rotational axis of the spool and rotationally movable with the retractor spool. The engagement of the sensor pawl with the ratchet wheel links the ratchet wheel to the spool, which causes the lock cup member to rotate with the rotating spool. The rotation of the lock cup in concert with the rotation of the spool causes a lock pawl to engage one or more teeth of another ratchet wheel, also referred to as a lock wheel. The lock wheel and the ratchet wheel that cooperates with the sensor pawl can be the same part. Engagement of the lock pawl with the teeth of the lock wheel leads to the initial lockup of a typical seat belt retractor.

When the seat belt tongue is removed from a cooperating seat belt buckle, the extended seat belt, also called seat belt webbing or webbing, will be retracted onto the spool in response to a bias force typically provided by a rewind spring. The rewind spring will rewind all of the available seat belt webbing onto the spool, so that the seat belt retractor is ready for another use cycle. This condition is typically called the stowed condition, as the seat belt webbing is now stowed or rewound onto spool. In this mode of operation it is anticipated and often required that the ELR locking mechanisms are in a deactivated condition so that the seat belt webbing is free to be protracted or retracted without intervention of the ELR locking mechanisms, that is the vehicle sensitive or web sensitive locking mechanisms. Occasionally, as the seat belt webbing is moved to the stowed position, the vehicle sensitive locking mechanism inadvertently will assume an undesirable locked condition, which prevents the seat belt from being easily protracted from the seat belt retractor. Fortunately this condition is usually temporary. This undesirable condition is avoided in the present invention by biasing the sensor pawl, when the seat belt is in a stowed condition, away from the ratchet wheel, preventing such an inadvertent lock condition of the retractor. If the seat belt retractor is mounted in a movable seat back, this feature will prevent the retractor from locking up as the seat back is moved.

It is also known for an emergency locking seat belt retractor to include ALR functionality. When in the ALR mode of operation, the vehicle sensitive and web sensitive locking functions are bypassed. ALR functionality of a seat belt retractor is typically activated as the seat belt webbing is secured about a child seat. As known by those skilled in the art, the acronym ALR stands for automatically locking retractor. In most situations, to activate the ALR mode of operation, most if not all of the seat belt webbing is manually pulled out or protracted from the spool prior to the seat belt being placed about a child seat. Then the seat belt is released to envelop the child seat. As the last section of seat belt webbing is protracted from the spool, the prior art retractor enters the automatic locking mode (ALR) mode of operation.

ALR mechanisms often include one or more gears, which rotate with the retractor spool and provide an effective measurement of the length of webbing that has been removed from the spool. As the webbing is pulled from the spool, the ALR mechanism typically presents a mechanical feature, which causes the retractor to enter into the automatic locking mode of operation. One such ALR mechanism shown in US 5 904 371 selectively biases an ALR pawl into engagement with a ratchet wheel on extension of the last section of the seat belt. Biasing the ALR pawl into the ratchet wheel initiates retractor lockup as provided by the vehicle sensitive locking mechanism. The seat belt retractor will remain in the ALR mode of operation as the length of protracted webbing is rewound on the spool and will return the seat belt retractor to the ELR mode of operation upon full retraction of the belt.

The ALR mechanism in US 5 904 371 includes a spring-loaded lever that is physically maintained out of engagement with the ALR pawl. The spring-loaded member is biased onto an edge of a cam disk that rotates with the spool. After a predetermined number of spool rotations corresponding to the removal of virtually all of the webbing from the spool, the cam disk is rotated into a position to present a notch to the spring-loaded lever. Thereafter the spring-loaded lever falls into the notch, engages a surface of the ALR lever and moves the ALR pawl into engagement with a tooth of the ratchet wheel to initiate lock-up of the seat belt retractor.

A seat belt retractor according to claim 1 overcomes the described problems in known seat belt retractors. In the present invention a single lever, in cooperation with other components, is used to control the locking mode (ELR/ALR) of the seat belt retractor. When the seat belt is fully stowed on the retractor spool, the lever is moved to a position that biases a sensor pawl upon a vehicle inertia mass to effectively block out the ELR mode of operation. Upon protraction of a small amount of webbing, the retractor enters an ELR mode of operation. During the normal mode of use with some of the seat belt webbing protracted about a vehicle occupant the retractor will remain in the ELR mode of operation, however, the ALR mode of operation is not accessible until after all of the seat belt has been pulled from the retractor.

This extension of the seat belt occurs when the seat belt is being placed, for example, about a child seat. In the ELR mode of operation the lever is displaced from the sensor pawl, and the sensor pawl and the vehicle inertia mass are permitted to move in response to vehicle dynamic conditions. In the ALR mode of operation the lever biases the sensor pawl into a cooperating ratchet wheel. The change into the automatic locking mode (ALR) is effective not upon the protraction of the last section of seat belt webbing but upon the initial angular rotation of the spool, in the direction of retraction from the fully protracted condition. Entering into the ALR mode of operation at the beginning of seat belt retraction causes less strain on the sensor pawl than initiating the ALR mode on the full extension of the webbing.

  • Figure 1 shows a seat belt retractor incorporating the present invention.
  • Figure 2 is an exploded perspective view of an ELR and ALR locking mechanism incorporating the present invention.
  • Figure 3 shows locking mechanisms used by a prior art seat belt retractor with the seat belt webbing stowed on the spool.
  • Figure 4 shows locking mechanisms used by a prior art retractor with the seat belt webbing fully extended.
  • Figure 5 is an isometric view of a lock cup.
  • Figure 6 shows the locking components when the seat belt has been fully rewound on the retractor spool to a stowed position.
  • Figure 6A shows the locking components when enough of the seat belt has been pulled out that the ELR mode of operation is active.
  • Figure 7 shows the locking components with virtually all of the seat belt pulled from the spool, just prior to activation of the ALR mode of operation.
  • Figure 8 shows the position of various locking components at the beginning of ALR operation.

Figures 1 and 2 illustrate seat belt retractor 20 incorporating the present invention. The seat belt retractor 20 includes a frame 22 that rotationally supports a spool 24 in a known manner. Seat belt webbing 28 is wound about the spool 24 and can be protracted from and rewound onto the spool. The seat belt retractor 20 includes a primary locking system 30, which comprises lock wheel 32, also known as a ratchet wheel, having a plurality of teeth 34. A lock pawl 36 has one or more teeth 38. The lock pawl 36 may also include a sensor pawl pin 39 that functions as a cam follower.

The seat belt retractor 20 is a dual mode retractor having ELR and ALR modes of operation. As known in the art, and as used herein and in the claims, ELR means an emergency locking retractor. An example of an ELR, which typically includes one or more inertial locking mechanisms is disclosed in EP 0 228 729 A1. As known in the art, and as used herein and in the claims, ALR means an automatically locking retractor. An example of an ALR mechanism is disclosed in US 5 904 371, which selectively biases an ALR pawl into engagement with a ratchet wheel on extension of the last section of the seat belt.

When in the ELR mode of operation the seat belt retractor 20 utilizes inertial locking mechanisms to initiate the lockup of the retractor that effects movement of the lock pawl 36 into engagement with the lock wheel 32. These inertial locking mechanisms are generally referred to as a retractor locking mechanism 40 comprising a movable inertial mass 42 and a sensor pawl 44, as shown in Figure 2. The sensor pawl includes an extending pin or projection 45. The sensor pawl is movable by a co-acting lever 130 into, and away from, the ratchet wheel 46, shown in Figure 1, having teeth 48. The wheel 46 rotates with and can be part of the spool 24.

Movement of the inertial mass 42 in response to excessive vehicle deceleration, or large displacement of the vehicle in roll or yaw, or rotation of the surface upon which the seat belt retractor is mounted such as a seat back, causes the inertial mass to move, roll or tip and engage an adjacent surface 44a of the pawl 44, thereby placing the pawl 44 into engagement with the teeth of ratchet wheel 46. Rotation of the ratchet wheel 46 with the sensor pawl engaged causes rotation of an associated lock cup 60, as shown in Figure 2 and in phantom line in Figure 1, which initiates the locking up of the seat belt retractor. The lock cups 60 are spring biased, typically against the frame 22 or another stationary retractor member, such spring being shown by arrow 68, which react against a boss or projection 69 on the frame.

The seat belt retractor 20 utilizes a lock cup 60 to support the inertial mass 42, which is supported by a basket 42a or other known support structure. The basket is received within a well 61 of the lock cup 60. The basket can be fixed or movable relative to the well 61. Engagement of the sensor pawl 44 to the ratchet wheel 46 couples the lock cup 60 to the ratchet wheel 46, or to the spool 24, causing the lock cup to rotate with the spool for at least for some limited number of degrees. The rotation of the lock cup moves the lock pawl 36 into engagement with the teeth of the lock wheel 32 thereby completing the initial phases of the locking of the seat belt retractor. The lock cup 60 may include a cam 66 that receives the cam follower 39 of the lock pawl 36. The rotation of the lock ring 60 rotates the lock pawl 36 about an axis 36a into engagement with the teeth of the lock wheel 32.

If the seat belt retractor 20 includes an energy absorber mechanism such as a torsion bar, after the seat belt retractor 20 is initially locked up, the spool is permitted to rotate and the seat belt permitted to protract from the spool 24 in a controlled manner as the torsion bar twists. The seat belt retractor 20 may also include a web sensor (not shown) that initiates a locking up of the seat belt retractor in response to an excessive rate of extension of the web from the retractor. This web sensor is housed in the lock cup as shown in US 5 904 371 and EP 2 287 29 A1. Activation of the web sensitive locking mechanism also couples the lock cup to the spool, thereby also causing engagement of the lock pawl and lock wheel.

Seat belt retractor 20 will remain in the ELR mode of operation during all times with the exception of when all of the seat belt webbing has been retracted upon the spool, that is the stowed condition, or when in the ALR mode of operation, which occurs in conjunction with the seat belt webbing being placed about a child seat.

The ALR locking mechanism 80 of the present invention utilizes a number of components known in the art. These known components include a ring gear 79, a center or eccentric gear 90, a movable or wobble gear 100 and a cam disk 110, shown both in Figures 2 and 3. The ring gear 80 has a plurality of teeth 82 and is, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, integrally formed on a surface of the lock cup 60. The center, eccentric, gear 90 is secured to and rotatable with spool 24. The spool 24 includes a stub axle or projection 27, shown in Figures 1 and 3, that extends through an opening 62 in the lock cup and is received within a bore on a rear surface of the center gear, thereby permitting the center gear 90 to move with the spool. The center gear 90 includes an eccentric outer surface 92 received within an opening 102 of the movable, wobble, gear 100 and a raised surface 94 that is concentric with the opening 62 and received within an opening 112 of a cam disk 110.

The movable, wobble, gear 100 has a centrally located opening 102 and a plurality of teeth 104 engageable with the teeth 82 of the ring gear 80. As the center gear 90 rotates with the spool, the movable gear rotates and orbits about the ring gear 80. The movable gear 100 further includes an upstanding pin or projection 106.

The cam disk 110 has a concentric outer surface forming a cam surface 114. The cam surface has at least one major indentation 116 and an optional minor indentation 116a having a smaller depth. The cam disk 110 has an arcuate slot 118 therein in which the projection 106 of the movable gear 100 is received. The seat belt retractor will enter into the ALR mode of operation when a lever is permitted to fully enter into the indentation 116.

Prior art ALR mechanisms are shown in Figures 3 and 4. The prior art ALR mechanisms have a spring-loaded lever 230, like element 102 disclosed in US 5 904 371, which functions as a cam follower 232 and also is used to activate an ALR pawl 234, like the pawl 80 of US 5 904 371, to initiate the ALR mode of operation. The present invention has a spring-loaded lever 130, which incorporates the above functions and also incorporates new functionality, as compared to the prior art. The lever 130 includes a known type of a projection 132, which functions as a cam follower. The cam follower 132 is biased against the cam surface 114 by a bias spring 130a, which is sometimes indicated by an arrow.

The prior art ALR mechanism is activated upon the extension of virtually all of the seat belt from the spool 24. Figures 3 and 4 are illustrative of the operation of a prior art seat belt retractor and are used for the purpose of illustrating some of the components of seat belt retractor 20. In the prior art ALR mechanism with all of the seat belt webbing rewound about the spool, the various components of the ALR mechanism achieve an orientation as shown in Figure 3. The cam follower 232 will position itself in the minor indentation 116a, which prevents premature movement of the cam disk 110. As the webbing is pulled from the spool, the spool rotates causing the center gear 90 to rotate, which in turn moves movable gear 100, which in turn causes the projection 106 to rotate and orbit about the ring gear 80, as well as causing the projection 106 to move within slot 118 of the cam disk 110. As more and more seat belt webbing 28 is protracted from the spool, the projection 106 will be moved a sufficient distance to contact the end 120 (see Figure 4) of the slot 118, thereby causing the cam disk 110 to rotate with the moving gear 100.

The gear mechanism of the prior art is configured such that when virtually all of the webbing has been removed from the spool the cam disk 110 will present the slot 116 to the cam follower 232, which causes the cam follower to be pushed into the slot 116. This action does not happen in the present invention because of the employment of a second cam disk 150. Thereafter the lever 230 lifts the ALR pawl 234 into engagement with the teeth of the ratchet wheel 46 to initiate the ALR mode of operation, which is initiated upon full or substantially full extraction of the seat belt. The prior art seat belt retractor will remain in this mode of operation until the webbing 24 is fully retracted. In the prior art ALR mechanism, as the webbing 24 is retracted the center gear moves oppositely causing the movable gear 90 and the projection 106 to move opposite to the prior motion. As the webbing is retracted the projection 106 engages the opposite end 122 of the slot 118, pushing the cam disk oppositely (counter-clockwise in Figure 3). This urges the cam follower 132 to move up a sloped surface 124 of slot 116 and become repositioned on the outer surface of the cam surface 114. This motion disengages the lever from the ALR pawl and ends the ALR mode of operation.

Returning to the present invention, reference is again made to Figures 2 and 5. The lock cup 60 includes a plurality of resilient inwardly directed flexible tabs 64 uniformly positioned about the ring gear 80 and concentric with opening 62 of the lock cup 60. The cam surface 114 is received within these tabs 64, which position the cam disk 110 concentric with the opening 62, as well as the axis of rotation of the spool 24. Each tab 64 has an upraised wall portion 64a as well as an inwardly extending wall portion. The cam surface 114 rides against an inner wall of the upraised wall portion 64a while the inwardly directed wall portion 64b prevents the outer edge of the cam disk from moving away from the lock cup and ring gear.

The ALR mechanism of the present invention further includes a second cam disk 150 that assists in controlling the start of the ALR mode of operation to begin upon rewinding of the spool after full extension of the webbing. The second cam disk, in concert with the lever 130, also provides a controlled biasing of the sensor pawl 44 to provide a stabilizing force upon the inertial mass 42 at or near the complete retraction of the seat belt upon the spool to eliminate a source of vibration and noise. The cam disk 150 also permits the lever to achieve a mid-position to enable ELR mode of operation.

The second cam disk 150 includes a circular annular shaped wall 152 having a thin internal rim 153. The rim 153 is rotationally supported by the first cam disk 110. The first cam disk 110 includes a plurality of inwardly directed tabs 156 similar in construction to the tabs 64. The tabs 156 include a first wall portion 158a extending away from the surface of the cam disk 110 and an outwardly directed portion 158b. An inner surface of portion 158a radially stabilizes the annular wall 152 while a portion 158b holds the rim 153, and hence, the second cam disk 150. The second cam disk 150 further includes an inwardly directed socket 160 having an opening 162 therein to loosely receive the projection 106 of the moving gear 100. The second cam disk includes a first lobe or cam surface 164 positioned generally opposite the socket 160 and a second lobe or cam surface 166.

As the seat belt webbing is extended from the spool, from a fully stowed condition to a fully extended condition, the projection 106 of the wobble gear 100 generally orbits in a circle centered on an axis collinear with the axis of the spool while simultaneously rotating or oscillating, at a higher frequency, about the circle, with such movement constrained to be within the slot 118. The slot 118 affords the locking mechanism a degree of lost motion, that is when the projection 106 is not pushing on the ends of the slot 118, the first cam disk 110 will not move. The projection 106 directly moves the first cam disk in a clockwise manner in relation to Figure 6 during web extraction, and in a counter-clockwise manner during web retraction. As the projection or pin 106 moves as described, it also rotates within the opening 162 of the socket 160 of the second cam disk 150, and carries the second cam disk 150 with the pin 106. The second cam disk 150 will rotate clockwise and counterclockwise generally following the rotation of the wobble gear 100.

Figure 6 shows the positions of the locking components when the seat belt has been fully rewound on the retractor spool to a stowed position. In this condition the ELR locking mechanism is blocked out from use. In this condition the cam surface 166 urges the cam follower 132 away from the cam surface 114 of the cam disk 110. The cam surface 166 moves the cam follower 132 a greater distance away from the center of the spool.

As the seat belt webbing is extended from the seat belt retractor, the spool will rotate in a clockwise direction (in relation to Figure 6); the various components of the gearing mechanisms will similarly rotate. As the webbing is extracted, the wobble gear 100, via projection 106 and the socket 160, moves the second cam disk 150 in a clockwise manner (see arrow on the second cam disk). The first cam disk will generally remain in the initial position as the projection or pin 106 is moved away from end 122 of slot 118 into a free zone. After the seat belt has been slightly extended, the second cam disk will be moved by projection or pin 106 sufficiently clockwise to permit the cam follower 132 to fall onto the cam surface 114 of the first cam disk 110. In this mode of operation, the cam follower 132 moves inwardly to the cam surface 114, which moves the end 140 of lever 132 away from the pin 45 of the sensor pawl 44. This action permits the seat belt retractor to enter into the ELR mode of operation and is shown in Figure 6A. Figure 6A shows the position achieved by the locking components when the seat belt has been pulled out a determinable amount in which the ELR mode of operation is active, however, the ALR mode is not available.

In Figure 5, the lever 130 is rotationally mounted to the lock cup 60. The lock cup is not shown in Figures 6, 6a, 7 and 8. Only a pin 60a, which is part of the lock cup and which rotationally supports the lever 130 is shown.

Figure 7 shows the position achieved by the locking components with virtually all of the seat belt pulled from the spool, just prior to activation of the ALR mode of operation. The second cam disk 150 is configured to be located above the slot 116 of cam disk 110 generally just before all of the webbing 28 has been extracted as shown in Figure 7. The placement of the lobe or surface 164 above the slot 116 prevents the cam follower 132 of the lever 130 from entering into the slot 116. This prevents the seat belt retractor from entering into the ALR mode of operation on full extraction of the webbing 28, as taught by the prior art. The radial extent of the surface 164 is not critical, and it can be the same as the radial extent of the surface 114, slightly smaller or greater as it acts as a blocking surface. Upon release of the webbing 28 or the reduction of the force holding the webbing in an extended condition, the webbing will begin to be rewound upon the spool by operation of the rewind spring 29 (see Figure 1). The change of direction of the spool 24 causes the center, eccentric, gear 90 to rotate oppositely causing the moving, wobble, gear 100 to move oppositely as well (counterclockwise in Figure 7). This action causes movement of the projection or pin 106 away from end 120 of slot 118, which moves the second cam disk 150 in a counterclockwise direction opposite to the motion when the seat belt was being extended.

Figure 8 shows the position of various locking components at the beginning of ALR operation. Upon a determinable amount of rotation of the disk 150, the cam follower 132 is permitted to slide upon an edge 170 of the lobe 166, and enter into a groove 116, as this action permits the lever 130 to move inwardly. Inward movement of the lever 130 raises the pin 45 of the sensor pawl 44 and moves the sensor pawl 44 into engagement with the teeth of the ratchet gear 46 to now begin the ALR mode of operation as the spool rotates in the direction of seat belt retraction.

As the spool rotates in a rewind direction the projection 106 continues to move the second cam disk 150 in synchronism with the movement of the projection 106. After a determinable amount of webbing has been rewound onto the spool, the projection 106 will eventually engage an end 122 of a slot 118, thereby reengaging cam disk 110. Subsequently, the first cam disk 110 is returned to the initial position corresponding to a fully rewound spool shown in Figure 6, completing the cycle and positioning the lobe 166 under the cam follower 132, thereby biasing the lever 130 downwardly or outwardly (in Figure 6) away from surface 114 or in a counterclockwise manner (in Figure 2).

When the lever 130 is pushed outwardly upon engagement with the lobe 166 of the second cam disk 150, the pin 45 of the sensor pawl 44 is biased downwardly by a surface to hold the sensor pawl 44 upon the top of the inertial mass 42. The lever 130 has a distal end 134 having a ring 136 defining an opening 138. The pin 45 of the sensor pawl 44 is received within the opening 138 of the ring 136. One end 140 of the ring forms a first engagement surface and an opposite end 142 of the ring forms a second engagement surface. When the lever 130 moves into the groove 116 the second engagement surface 142 lifts the pin 45 and hence the sensor pawl 44 into engagement with the ratchet wheel 46 initiating the ALR mode of engagement, as shown in Figure 8. Upon return of the webbing to the spool, as shown in Figure 6, the engagement surface 140 urges the pin 45, and hence the sensor pawl 44, downwardly onto the inertial mass 44. This prevents the locking mechanism from becoming activated in the stowed position, regardless of the physical orientation of the seat belt retractor. The lever 130 assists in initiating the ALR mode of operating by moving the sensor pawl and also blocks the ELR mode of operation by preventing movement of the sensor pawl.


Anspruch[en]
1. A seat belt retractor (20) having at least three modes of operation: an ELR mode, an ALR mode and a stowed mode, and an ELR mechanism and an ALR mechanism; the ELR mechanism comprising: a retractor locking mechanism (40) comprising an inertial mass (42) supported by a lock cup (60), and a sensor pawl (44), the sensor pawl (44) movable by the inertial mass (42) in response to excessive levels of vehicle deceleration into engagement with a ratchet wheel (46) movable with a spool (24) of the seat belt retractor (20); the sensor pawl (44) movable by a lever (130) having a cam follower (132), into and out of contact with the ratchet wheel (46); the seat belt retractor (20) configured such that upon engagement of the sensor pawl (44) with the ratchet wheel (46), a lock cup (60) moves causing a lock pawl to engage the lock wheel, thereby preventing further unwinding of the spool (24) and withdrawal of belt; and the ALR mechanism comprising: a ring gear (79) formed on the lock cup (60); an eccentric gear (90), having an outer surface (92) rotatable with the spool (24) and received within a wobble gear (100), the wobble gear rotatingly engaged with teeth (82) of the ring gear (79); the wobble gear (100) including a projection (106) movable therewith, the wobble gear (100) and projection configured to rotate and orbit relative to the ring gear (79) in correspondence with the spool (24) or in correspondence with a shaft of the seat belt retractor (20); a first cam disk (110) having an outer cam surface (114) concentric to an axis, the outer cam surface (114) having an indentation (116) therein with the cam surface (114) rotatably held to the lock cup (60) by a plurality of flexible tabs (64), the first cam disk (110) having an arcuate slot (118) therein in which the projection (106) is movably received, the arcuate slot (118) having ends (120, 122) for periodic engagement with the projection (106), the first cam disk rotatable (110) with the projection (106) in a first direction upon engagement of the projection (106) with an end (120) of the arcuate slot (118) and rotatable in an opposite second direction upon engagement of the projection (106) with the other end (122) of the arcuate slot (118), wherein the lever (130) is biased towards the outer cam surface (114) by a bias spring (130a); a second cam disk (150) rotatable relative to the lock cup (60) and ring gear, as well as to the first cam disk (110) and wobble gear (100), the second cam disk (150) selectively rotatable to selectively prohibit the cam follower (132) from entering into the indentation (116), the second cam disk (150) including a socket (160) to loosely receive projection (106), the second cam disk (150) rotatable with projection (106), the second cam disk (150) further including an outwardly extending first cam surface (164) generally opposite the location of the socket (160) and an outwardly directed second cam surface (166) positioned therebetween; the above components configured to permit the wobble gear (100) to move about the ring gear (79) in a belt rewind direction as a belt, received about the spool (24), is extended from a fully stowed condition to a fully extended condition, the first cam disk (110) maintained in a non-rotatable state until the projection (106) pushes upon either slot end (120) or (122), the second cam disk (150) being rotatable with movement of the projection (106); and the components configured so that in the stowed mode, with substantially all the belt on the spool (24), the second cam surface (166) is positioned over the indentation (116) urging the cam follower (132) away from the cam surface (114) of cam disk (110). 2. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in claim 1 wherein the first cam disk (110) includes a plurality of inwardly directed tabs (156) to rotationally support the second cam disk (150). 3. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 1 wherein the socket (160) is oversized relative to the projection (106). 5. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 1 wherein the second cam disk (150) includes a transition surface that urges the cam follower (132) radially outward to reside upon the second cam surface (166) upon movement of the second cam disk (150). 6. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 1 wherein the lever (130) is pivotable about a pivot located on one side of the cam follower (132), the lever (130) further having an end or surface (140) positioned on another side of the cam follower (132), the sensor pawl (44) further including a sensor pawl pin (45), wherein in the stowed mode, the end or surface (140) urges the sensor pawl pin (45) and sensor pawl (44) to rotate away from engagement with the ratchet wheel (46) and causing the sensor pawl (44) to apply pressure on the inertial mass (42) prohibiting entry of the seat belt retractor (20) into the ELR mode of operation. 6. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 5 wherein the seat belt retractor (20) is configured such that further extension of the belt from the stowed condition causes rotation of the wobble gear (100) in a belt-winding direction urging the second cam disk (150) in the same direction relative to the first cam disk (110) exposing the indentation (116) and away from the cam follower (132), thereby permitting the cam follower (132) to engage the cam surface (114) of the first cam disk (110), such engagement separating the end (140) of lever (130) from the sensor pawl pin (45) freeing the inertial mass (42) and sensor pawl (44). 7. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 1 wherein the second cam disk (150) is configured to be moved by the projection and positioned in front of the indentation (116) immediately prior to all of the belt being extracted from the seat belt retractor (20), thereby preventing the cam follower (132) from entering into the indentation (116) to initiate the ALR mode of operation. 8. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 7 wherein immediately prior to all of the belt being extracted from the seat belt retractor (20), the second cam surface (166) of the second cam disk (150) is positioned in blocking relation to the indentation (116). 9. A seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 8 wherein the first cam surface (164) of the second cam disk (150) is at a radius greater than the radius of the second cam surface (166) of the second cam disk (150). 10. The seat belt retractor (20) as defined in Claim 8 whereupon movement of the spool (24) in a belt-winding direction moves the second cam disk (150) in a belt-winding direction to uncover the indentation (116), enabling the lever (130) to enter into the indentation (116), urging the sensor pawl pin (45) into engagement with the ratchet wheel (46) to initiate the ALR mode of operation, the seat belt retractor (20) configured to stay in the ALR mode of operation until the belt has been rewound upon the spool (24) to initiate the stowed mode of operation.






IPC
A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
B Arbeitsverfahren; Transportieren
C Chemie; Hüttenwesen
D Textilien; Papier
E Bauwesen; Erdbohren; Bergbau
F Maschinenbau; Beleuchtung; Heizung; Waffen; Sprengen
G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

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